Author Topic: How'd you like to feed this monster?!  (Read 591 times)

Stephen Hussar

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How'd you like to feed this monster?!
« on: July 24, 2017, 11:35:31 PM »
The original USS Massachusetts


Stephen Piwowarski

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Re: How'd you like to feed this monster?!
« Reply #1 on: July 25, 2017, 02:55:49 AM »
Talk about a team effort! Thanks for sharing this great pic. On the hottest of days our crews can take great joy in the knowledge that they are in a relatively open space with windows rather than in the bowels of a ship with barely any air circulating and huge boilers as their closest companions.

Bob Holmes

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Re: How'd you like to feed this monster?!
« Reply #2 on: July 25, 2017, 12:54:35 PM »
Looks very similar to pix of the boiler rooms of Titanic...

Philip Marshall

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Re: How'd you like to feed this monster?!
« Reply #3 on: July 25, 2017, 06:12:42 PM »
It reminds me of the folk song, "Firing the Mauretania", about the firemen on the RMS Mauretania (sister ship of the ill-fated Lusitania):

"The Mauretania's a wonderful sight
Sixty-four fires a-burning bright
But you'll shovel coal from morning to night
A-firing the Mauretania."

http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=25445

John Kokas

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Re: How'd you like to feed this monster?!
« Reply #4 on: July 25, 2017, 07:15:03 PM »
Actually the picture shows USS Massachucetts (BB-2) laid down in 1890.  It was actually the 3rd ship with that name and followed in the late 20's by BB-59. By early teens it was obsolete and redesignated ACR-2 (armoured cruiser) as battleships got bigger, faster, and larger gunned.

Paul Uhland

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Re: How'd you like to feed this monster?!
« Reply #5 on: July 25, 2017, 10:12:58 PM »
Marine fire rooms in steam-powered ships were always extremely hot, were death chambers should a high-pressure pipe break, and almost impossible to evacuate during flooding. Mercifully, oil fuel  replaced coal before WWII, ending back-breaking, nonstop hand firing.
A history of Titanic's voyage mentioned several hundred tons of coal were carried  for her transatlantic trip, dozens of shift firemen needed, many hired right off the street.

My ship, 50,000hp USS Mansfield DD728, built at the Bath Iron Works in the 1940s with oil-fired dual steam turbines, had HOT, ROARING engine spaces, still with the threat of  being broiled to death by superheated steam.

The latest USN vessels--carriers, submarines--are now nuclear powered, with jet fuel-powered turbines running smaller corvette, frigate and destroyer sizes, no hand labor, with enclosed cooler, safer, quieter control rooms.

While visiting Mansfield's engine spaces underway in rough weather to make sure their clocks were accurate, I pleasantly discovered the nearer I was to the ships's center of gravity/moments,  the ride was much smoother.   ;D

Notice the lucky swabbie shoveler wearing his wide-cuffed dungarees, blue Donald Duck hat and spit-shined shoes. Ah, the good-old daze. Not.
  
« Last Edit: July 26, 2017, 05:30:33 PM by Paul Uhland »
Paul Uhland

Stephen Hussar

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Re: How'd you like to feed this monster?!
« Reply #6 on: July 25, 2017, 10:20:36 PM »
Great discussion! Here's the stern of BB-2 Massachusetts in 1896. I should have looked at the history of Navy ships with that name before calling her the original.
I forgot where I was for a second  :D  The newest navy ships at BIW are looking pretty darn cool too...

« Last Edit: July 25, 2017, 10:22:48 PM by Stephen Hussar »

Paul Uhland

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Re: How'd you like to feed this monster?!
« Reply #7 on: July 25, 2017, 10:44:50 PM »
Steve...great pic. Reminds me that the destroyer recently hit by a cargo ship off Tokyo Bay is now in drydock at nearby US Naval Base Yokosuka, with bad superstructure damage, but worse, it suffered a big, underwater hull gash under that area into a crew compartment like Mansfield's, which almost resulted in the ship's foundering.

Good thing the weather was decent, having been there on Mansfield, in 30-foot waves that happen during fall monsoon shift.

Notice that all big commercial ships now have what appears to be a bulbous, forward bow protrusion under their waterlines,  has to do with lessening water friction resistance, undoubtedly  caused the destroyer's underwater damage.
« Last Edit: July 26, 2017, 05:26:10 PM by Paul Uhland »
Paul Uhland