Author Topic: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread  (Read 55020 times)

Joe Fox

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Re: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #180 on: February 27, 2020, 12:33:00 PM »
Absolutely amazing work Harold. The countless hours that you, Eric, and a few others have spent in planning, studying, and now executing for this project is simply amazing. Well done to everyone involved. It is very amazing to see things starting to shape up.

John Kokas

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Re: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #181 on: February 27, 2020, 02:29:20 PM »
The next question is, after the learning curve of this project, how hard would it be then to construct another car or two?
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Anthony Vo

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Re: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #182 on: February 27, 2020, 03:47:29 PM »
The next question is, after the learning curve of this project, how hard would it be then to construct another car or two?
more like why not construct another while y'all are at?
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Ed Lecuyer

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Re: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #183 on: February 27, 2020, 04:02:27 PM »
The next major coach project is to do a full restoration on Coach 3. It is really way overdue for an overhaul.

After that, there have been various other proposals to construct replica coaches. However, these all pre-date the collaboration between the WW&F and MNG. Even with the new expansion of the car barn to an exhibit space, indoor storage will remain a premium. We may be better off focusing on non-coach projects for a little while.

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Graham Buxton

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Re: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #184 on: February 27, 2020, 04:31:49 PM »
  ;D  Hmmm . . . The Pavilion roof isn't finished yet, but I seem to recall Mike saying that the Pavilion 'floor' hadn't been decided yet.   Is it time to consider a poured concrete floor with 'embedded' rails?  :P


Use the Pavilion for Events in the operating season, and car storage in the off-season.


 8)
Graham

Ed Lecuyer

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Re: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #185 on: February 27, 2020, 04:59:41 PM »
Dual use of the pavilion was considered, but deemed impractical - mainly due to placement constraints.

There have been some ideas floated around - but nothing is in the immediate works (except, of course, the roundhouse - which will help alleviate the storage crunch.)
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Wayne Laepple

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Re: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #186 on: February 27, 2020, 05:31:49 PM »
There certainly are a multitude of non-coach projects waiting in the wings.

Mike Fox

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Re: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #187 on: February 27, 2020, 06:35:45 PM »
We could build a building a year and not have enough storage. Excellent work Harold.
Mike
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Fred Morse

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Re: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #188 on: February 27, 2020, 06:37:34 PM »
We're not all COACH-men.

Harold Downey

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Re: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #189 on: February 27, 2020, 07:06:31 PM »
Merci, Alain!

Thanks Bernie.   I do eat and sleep.  ;)  Actually I spend on average about a half a day out in the shop every day that I can.  I recorded about 300 hours for the114 window sashes, coming to about 2-3/4 hours each.   I admit that this job became a serious grind.  Each operation takes hours, since there are so many parts.    For the last 23 days, to glue up three windows, clean up the three from the day before, check and fit the parts for the next day's glue-up of three, and then final sanding three, took almost 3-3/4 hours per day.   And that's nearly all I did each day on this job.    That was a slog; every day the same thing.   

Just picked up the wood for the two doors and their respective windows today.   There's an odd market for white oak.  The rage in architecture today is to use rift sawn white oak, which is grain about 30-60 degrees from vertical.  That gives a very linear grain, and no rays that you see in quarter sawn.   So for the door which will be 1-3/8" thick, I had to pick through the rack of rift sawn oak looking  for the few pieces that are actually closer to quarter sawn.  Without the demand for all the rift sawn oak, they wouldn't carry anything in that thickness.   This job should be more enjoyable -- only two doors and four windows!  And I know how to do the windows. 

Oh, and I won't be there for SWW this April.   I don't think the windows will be needed that soon.    I also want to complete the salon (toilet) walls and door as well.    Then I should have a big enough load to justify the drive again.   Or maybe I will just crate it all up and ship it freight. 

John Kokas

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Re: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #190 on: February 27, 2020, 07:43:46 PM »
Harold, sounds like you need some minions !!!  Beautiful work even if its a slough.
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Stephen Piwowarski

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Re: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #191 on: February 28, 2020, 10:29:27 PM »
Harold- first and foremost great work and thank you for sharing an update on your progress.
Interesting about your trouble finding quartersawn white oak. In organ building we use quite a bit of white oak for casework, but also in the windchests and smaller dimension wooden pipes, because of it's strength. We used white oak specifically because it has closed capillaries which do not allow air to leak readily as opposed to red oak, which could leak air readily.

As for the quartersawn oak, that was specifically sought after for casework due to the appearance and aforementioned rays. Leonard Lumber, in Durham, CT was our supplier and we had good luck with them, but it's a bit far for you. Surprised it is hard to come by your way.

Steve

Harold Downey

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Re: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #192 on: February 28, 2020, 10:58:20 PM »
Stephen - they have q-sawn oak, but only in 4/4" thickness.  The selection in 4/4 is great.   In the rift sawn stacks of 6/4 and 8/4, I have been able to select what I need that is effectively q-sawn.  I should ask for a discount, because the folks that want true rift sawn don't want the rays, so what I take would not normally be desired. 

Stephen Piwowarski

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Re: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #193 on: February 28, 2020, 11:15:18 PM »
Ah, I understand! Not a bad idea to ask for a discount! ;)

Pete "Cosmo" Barrington

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Re: Coach 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #194 on: February 29, 2020, 12:13:32 AM »
BOO-NERDS!!!
BEEEEWWWWW!!!  :-* :-* ;)

(Sorry, ... had to)