Author Topic: Building track in 1910  (Read 1312 times)

John Kokas

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Re: Building track in 1910
« Reply #15 on: April 04, 2017, 09:19:23 PM »
Now that would be the ultimate ROWMOW Mfg. project!

Mike Fox

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Re: Building track in 1910
« Reply #16 on: April 04, 2017, 09:32:01 PM »
I think that would take a lot more effort and expertise than currently employed at ROWMOW Mfg. I was thinking more of having to step up the grading efforts to get far enough ahead just to run that thing one day..
Mike
Membership Secretary, Life Member, President of ROWMOW 1 Manufacturing, Inc. CMO of off rail equipment

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: Building track in 1910
« Reply #17 on: April 04, 2017, 10:00:25 PM »
I want to build one.

I waaaaaannnnnnnnttttttttt to build one...


Bill Baskerville

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Re: Building track in 1910
« Reply #18 on: April 04, 2017, 10:35:46 PM »
Jason,

Of course you would!!!!

Bill

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: Building track in 1910
« Reply #19 on: April 05, 2017, 01:40:28 AM »
http://www.oil-electric.com/2011/04/april-7-1914-roberts-steam-tracklayer.html

Note in the required crew list the official position of "tie fiddler."

Why wouldn't we want this machine?

I also found the best description I've ever seen of how track was hand-laid, in this article on the CPRR's 10 mile in a day record. 

http://cprr.org/Museum/Southern_Pacific_Bulletin/Ten_Mile_Day.html

Who wants to be a tie fiddler?

see ya
Jason


Bill Baskerville

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Re: Building track in 1910
« Reply #20 on: April 05, 2017, 02:43:24 AM »
In reading the article Jason provided, it would appear that we lay track with 'square joints' as opposed to 'broken joints'.  Perhaps our method isn't so out of the ordinary after all.

Bill

Bob Holmes

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Re: Building track in 1910
« Reply #21 on: April 05, 2017, 02:57:23 AM »
I was also noticing the average height of the track gang vs the gauge width.  On the other hand, men were not as tall back then...

Bill Baskerville

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Re: Building track in 1910
« Reply #22 on: April 05, 2017, 02:58:35 AM »
BTW, I would be happy to be the Tie Fiddler.  I think I could handle that job if I studied hard........

Bill