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Author Topic: Building track in 1910  (Read 823 times)
Wayne Laepple
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« on: April 04, 2017, 01:05:26 AM »

No hard hats, no gloves, no Insta-track. Apparently they relied on the weight of the equipment to hold the gauge!

www.youtube.com/watch?v=W9dOcTFN5R4&feature=em-subs_digest
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Bob Holmes
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« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2017, 01:19:57 AM »

Holy cow, with one of those, we could get to Albion in not time at all...
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Jason M Lamontagne
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« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2017, 01:52:26 AM »

I just saw this separately from another source and LOVE it!

I wondered about holding gauge under that machine too, then I noticed gauge rods. 

I really like that machine.  A LOT.  Hmmmmm.......

Their spiking rhythm is interesting- it seemed most swing the hammer as many of us do- choking up with one hand on the haul-back, as opposed to the "windmill" method.  That windmill business always seemed a little awkward to me; here's a period example of not doing it that way. 

Their spikers weren't all that organized, either, it seemed.

Great video...

Jason
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James Patten
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« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2017, 02:05:40 AM »

So when do we build a two-foot gauge version of that car at the front?
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Wayne Laepple
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« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2017, 02:27:02 AM »

You must have better eyes than i do. I've looked at this three times now, and I don't see a gauge rod anywhere. Come to think of it, I didn't see a track gauge, either!
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Stewart "Start" Rhine
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« Reply #5 on: April 04, 2017, 02:52:15 AM »

We were also wondering how the rails kept gauge for the track laying machine and locomotive to pass over them when we didn't see anyone spiking or setting gauge rods.
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Jason M Lamontagne
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« Reply #6 on: April 04, 2017, 03:09:10 AM »

I didn't see them setting gauge rods, but I saw them in place as they were spiking.  I presume they must have been set prior to the machine traveling the freshly laid steel.

Somewhat similar to our use of Insta-Track (TM).

See ya
Jason
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Bill Baskerville
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« Reply #7 on: April 04, 2017, 03:19:36 AM »

Look at 4:19 and you will see a man with his back to the camera setting the gauge rod about 4 feet back from the left hand end of rail.  You have to look quickly.  Apparently someone had previously laid the gauge rod on the ground as you don't see him carry it over.

Also note that two guys are putting on the two bolts on the two joint bars at the end of each rail before it is shot out for the cables to pick them up to be set on the ties.

They are just a little faster than us.

Bill
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Philip Marshall
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« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2017, 03:24:01 AM »

And yet the ties are all so uneven, and with just two flat sides, they have to be hand-hewn!

Also, I can't see anyone at the front of the machine passing signals back to the engineer. How does he know when to start and stop?
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Mike Fox
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« Reply #9 on: April 04, 2017, 03:39:59 AM »

Guage rods can be seen being set at about 4:20
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Mike
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« Reply #10 on: April 04, 2017, 03:43:21 AM »

Also, the guy up on the machine, upper left at around 4:55 seems to be the one controling movement. See the burst of steam under him while the train is stopped.
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Mike
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Bob Holmes
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« Reply #11 on: April 04, 2017, 01:38:44 PM »

Doesn't the gauge seem excessively wide, or is that an illusion...
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Philip Marshall
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« Reply #12 on: April 04, 2017, 05:43:00 PM »

I think that's just an optical illusion. Standard gauge sometimes looks like broad gauge in old photos because of the small equipment and light rail, both smaller than we're used to seeing now. (Yes, I know the Grand Trunk was originally built to 5'6" broad gauge, but they had long since converted to standard gauge by 1910.)
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Jeff Schumaker
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« Reply #13 on: April 04, 2017, 07:38:04 PM »

Anyone catch the fellow in the vest and tie jotting something down in a notebook? It's around the 7 minute mark.

Jeff S.
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John McNamara
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« Reply #14 on: April 04, 2017, 07:54:31 PM »

This may also be an illusion, or at least part of the "gauge too wide" appearance, but the amount of tie outside the rails seems quite small. The appearance of inadequate space beyond the rail may just be my perception, as the WW&F is generous in that regard. The reason we are generous is to spread the load more evenly, and this brings up the issue of ballast. It appears they did use any, and I have trouble recalling early track-laying photos with ballast. We could start an entire new thread on early track-laying technique.....
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