Author Topic: Settle Carlisle RR  (Read 1127 times)

Carl Soderstrom

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Settle Carlisle RR
« on: February 28, 2017, 05:29:36 AM »
This is not narrow gauge (I think) but may be interesting to some.

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-cumbria-39020181

Their Home Page

http://www.settle-carlisle.co.uk/about-us/
« Last Edit: February 28, 2017, 05:31:15 AM by Carl Soderstrom »

Philip Marshall

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Re: Settle Carlisle RR
« Reply #1 on: February 28, 2017, 06:25:53 AM »
Very neat, Carl. Thanks for the link.

Tornado is of course the new-build 4-6-2 completed in 2008 by the A1 Steam Locomotive Trust. She is definitely standard gauge.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LNER_Peppercorn_Class_A1_60163_Tornado

Bill Baskerville

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Re: Settle Carlisle RR
« Reply #2 on: February 28, 2017, 12:38:33 PM »
Such neat station names, you can travel to Giggleswick, or Ribblehead, or Langwathby.
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Wayne Laepple

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Re: Settle Carlisle RR
« Reply #3 on: March 02, 2017, 01:26:32 AM »
Here's a link to a YouTube video of Tornado working the Settle & Carlisle route on Feb. 14. There are no turning facilities at Settle, so the engine ran in reverse one way. The black and white film gives viewers a good idea of how desolate and empty this part of England is. Note: Tornado is a three-cylinder engine, so its exhausts make it sound as if it is moving faster than it is.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WH5xzEW-fLw

Correction made, as noted below.
« Last Edit: March 02, 2017, 02:31:34 PM by Wayne Laepple »

Bill Piche

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Re: Settle Carlisle RR
« Reply #4 on: March 02, 2017, 04:28:08 AM »
Note: Tornado is a four-cylinder engine, so its exhausts make it sound as if it is moving faster than it is.

Tornado's 3 cylinders offset 120 degrees, which is why she sounds so much faster for her big drivers.

Most 4 cylinder engines (Like the GWR Saints, Castles and Kings) in the UK are paired and offset 90 degrees (180 inside R/L to outside L/R) to balance each other. Those run incredibly smooth and sound like the correct number of beats per revolution as opposed to the 3 cylinder designs.
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Philip Marshall

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Re: Settle Carlisle RR
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2017, 06:11:14 AM »
Most 4 cylinder engines (Like the GWR Saints, Castles and Kings) in the UK are paired and offset 90 degrees (180 inside R/L to outside L/R) to balance each other. Those run incredibly smooth and sound like the correct number of beats per revolution as opposed to the 3 cylinder designs.

"God's Wonderful Railway" (GWR) did everything in style.

Bill Piche

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Re: Settle Carlisle RR
« Reply #6 on: March 02, 2017, 06:44:52 AM »
Most 4 cylinder engines (Like the GWR Saints, Castles and Kings) in the UK are paired and offset 90 degrees (180 inside R/L to outside L/R) to balance each other. Those run incredibly smooth and sound like the correct number of beats per revolution as opposed to the 3 cylinder designs.

"God's Wonderful Railway" (GWR) did everything in style.

"Great Way Round" if you ask the guys at the museums over there that specialize in the Southern Railway.
Engineer/Fireman, MNGRR
"Any day with steam is a good day." - me

Steve Smith

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Re: Settle Carlisle RR
« Reply #7 on: March 03, 2017, 03:28:19 AM »
The Southern Railway in England had a class of 4-6-0 locomotives with four cylinders, the angular intervals, in degrees, between its four cranks being 135 – 90 – 45 – 90.

This resulted in eight evenly spaced exhaust beats per revolution of the drivers, resulting in what was called an eight-beat exhaust.

One of the class, No. 850, the Lord Nelson, has been preserved. At about 8:00 in this YouTube video the exhaust beats are distinct enough, and the view of the drivers unobstructed, so that you can clearly hear/observe the eight-beat exhaust.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iD-dB_ub264