Author Topic: WW&F switch stands  (Read 1487 times)

Jeff Schumaker

  • Museum Member
  • Hostler
  • ***
  • Posts: 247
    • View Profile
WW&F switch stands
« on: January 26, 2017, 11:30:27 PM »
Does anyone happen to know how far above the ground the targets were on WW&F switch stands?

Jeff Schumaker

Benjamin Campbell

  • Switchman
  • **
  • Posts: 65
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F switch stands
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2017, 11:44:20 PM »
Which type of switch stand? They used several different makes. I am particularly intrigued by the milk bottle shaped switch stands which are seen only in the Wiscasset yard and were presumably included in the first order of rail and switches ordered by the W&Q.  I have been trying to figure out the dimensions of these particular switches myself. They also appear to have some writing cast in an arc on their main body. Unfortunately I have not been able to locate a closeup photograph in which it may be read.

Jeff Schumaker

  • Museum Member
  • Hostler
  • ***
  • Posts: 247
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F switch stands
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2017, 02:13:03 AM »
I am referring to the ones along the mainline.

Jeff

Benjamin Campbell

  • Switchman
  • **
  • Posts: 65
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F switch stands
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2017, 02:10:09 PM »
They did use the switches I am talking about on the mainline but only in the Wiscasset area as far as I can tell. North of there I believe that they still used more than one style of switch which may or may not have had their signs at a uniform height.  They have one original switch. Maybe someone will measure the height of the main casting for you and you can scale that against photographs showing the target.

Paul Uhland

  • Museum Member
  • Engineer
  • ****
  • Posts: 548
    • View Profile
Re: WW&F switch stands
« Reply #4 on: January 28, 2017, 05:29:20 AM »
There appear to be three general types of manual switch stands in the US...very low ones called ground throw switches, used in yards and off-mainline use...a short vertical type...and a tall version with a high target mast, usually in main line use.
Some of the switch stands on the WW&F appear to be a vintage type unique to the area, requiring the user to step between the stand and the track to throw,  a potentially dangerous situation, having thrown a few for the ATSF, particularly when kicking cars in yard work.
« Last Edit: January 28, 2017, 05:30:56 AM by Paul Uhland »
Paul Uhland