Author Topic: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel  (Read 11979 times)

James Patten

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Re: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel
« Reply #30 on: February 02, 2018, 01:09:16 AM »
Some of the Queensland 2' gauge locos are actually ex-3'6" locos - former Queensland "standard" gauge switchers.

Ed Lecuyer

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Re: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel
« Reply #31 on: February 02, 2018, 01:58:48 AM »
Ed Lecuyer
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Wayne Laepple

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Re: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel
« Reply #32 on: February 02, 2018, 02:29:51 AM »
Let us be clear that the Baldwin sugar railway diesels are NOT from Baldwin Locomotive Works, USA; rather they are by E.M. Baldwin & Sons of New South Wales, Australia -- no relation.
« Last Edit: February 02, 2018, 02:43:18 AM by Ed Lecuyer »

Ed Lecuyer

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Re: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel
« Reply #33 on: February 02, 2018, 02:43:58 AM »
Oh. You learn something new every day. They kind of look like a US Baldwin.
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Roger Cole

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Re: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel
« Reply #34 on: February 02, 2018, 03:51:36 AM »
3' 6" is also known as Cape Gauge as in South Africa.

Philip Marshall

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Re: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel
« Reply #35 on: February 02, 2018, 03:54:38 AM »
But just to be confusing, the WWI gas-mechanical locos like FR 'Moelwyn' mentioned earlier in the thread really are from the US Baldwin Locomotive Works, not the Australian Baldwin.

Robert Hale

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Re: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel
« Reply #36 on: February 02, 2018, 11:54:36 AM »
But just to be confusing, the WWI gas-mechanical locos like FR 'Moelwyn' mentioned earlier in the thread really are from the US Baldwin Locomotive Works, not the Australian Baldwin.

I'll try to clarify my position: My plan for #53 & #54 settled on the drive train style of the Baldwin gas-mechanical like the 'Moelwyn' minus the leading non-powered axle and then making a 0-4-0+0-4-0 twin engine center cab engine using Cummins 6BTs with automatic transmissions on both ends. A 100-120 gallon fuel tank and air tanks from a semi-truck. I'm aiming for about 20-25000lbs with a top out of 30000lbs max.

Rob

Wayne Laepple

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Re: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel
« Reply #37 on: February 02, 2018, 04:33:49 PM »
Here's a 1935-vintage 150 hp 0-6-0 diesel built in Australia. Still in existence, still operational.

John Kokas

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Re: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel
« Reply #38 on: February 03, 2018, 12:45:25 PM »
Robert,

Due to the scaled down size of your proposed engine, I would suggest you look more at a 4BT engine rather than a 6BT.  They are available up to 140HP which is only slightly less than the original engines on a 44 tonner.  There are lots of surplus or re-man engines available for very reasonable prices.  Also I would look at diesel-electric as they would not require transmissions, gearing, etc. They would also be period correct since both GE and I-R were building boxcabs during the 1920's-30s.
Moxie Bootlegger

Robert Hale

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Re: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel
« Reply #39 on: February 05, 2018, 01:11:34 PM »
Robert,

Due to the scaled down size of your proposed engine, I would suggest you look more at a 4BT engine rather than a 6BT.  They are available up to 140HP which is only slightly less than the original engines on a 44 tonner.  There are lots of surplus or re-man engines available for very reasonable prices.  Also I would look at diesel-electric as they would not require transmissions, gearing, etc. They would also be period correct since both GE and I-R were building boxcabs during the 1920's-30s.

The biggest issue I have been running into is finding a suitable generator head to power the electrics. Traction motors and controllers are easy to find, but the generator is the hard part. I'll keep digging unless someone knows of a good DC generator head out there.
4BTs are also a good option but they are pricey to the point of costing more than 6BTs right now.

Rob

Edit: Just found a 26KW diesel DC genset. Now to look up if speed controllers can handle variable voltages to operate electric motors.

Edit 2: HOLY COW! Speed controllers are $$$$$$$, motors are about $4000.00 ea, and that is not including all the wire, relays, fuses ect and the genset is not cheap as well. I think this was why I shied away from diesel-electric.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2018, 02:44:51 PM by Robert Hale »

Wayne Laepple

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Re: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel
« Reply #40 on: February 05, 2018, 04:20:07 PM »
Just as a matter of information, as well as a possible assist in the design of a new internal combustion locomotive, the early General electric steeple-cab electric locomotives were fitted with arch-bar trucks. See photo. This particular locomotive was later outfitted with a diesel engine and generator buy its original owner, the Warwick Railway in Rhode Island, and still later purchased and retrofitted with another larger diesel by the Strasburg Rail Road. Unfortunately, it was too small for their needs and scrapped.
« Last Edit: February 05, 2018, 04:28:46 PM by Wayne Laepple »

Robert Hale

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Re: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel
« Reply #41 on: February 05, 2018, 07:27:28 PM »
Just as a matter of information, as well as a possible assist in the design of a new internal combustion locomotive, the early General electric steeple-cab electric locomotives were fitted with arch-bar trucks. See photo. This particular locomotive was later outfitted with a diesel engine and generator buy its original owner, the Warwick Railway in Rhode Island, and still later purchased and retrofitted with another larger diesel by the Strasburg Rail Road. Unfortunately, it was too small for their needs and scrapped.

I'll keep doing the research on the diesel electric.

Robert Hale

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Re: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel (update)
« Reply #42 on: May 31, 2019, 12:07:44 PM »
Update:
I put my planning on the back burner due to work and some medical issues (food allergy) but now I am back at working on the diesel design. From what I can see and find a diesel-hydraulic (automatic transmission) set up with mechanical running gear is the cheapest course to chart. Twin 6BT Cummins engines (2 valve with the mechanical pump) and the automatic transmissions out of the Dodge 250/350 trucks. Parts are easy to get. Center transmission is a custom part (fabbed and welded steel) with off the shelf ring and pinions and a custom reversing bottom (like how an outboard motor shifts). I just finished the rough design of the truck gearboxes since finding split seals was a challenge, they will also use ring and pinions of the shelf (Dana 80) and be fabbed steel. I just need to email the retailer on the ability of running the gears both ways in the axle gearboxes.
From what I gather the speed limit on the line is 15mph so the way this thing will be geared that will be close to topping out. I also plan on having it run with air compressors and disk brakes. Still working out other systems to run both engines simultaneously and yes it will have a cab heater and maybe A/C.
I'll be teaching myself my older CAD program that I have and try to get all this down on paper and digitally. Bear with me since I do work full time and am doing my best.

Rob

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel
« Reply #43 on: June 01, 2019, 12:04:25 AM »
Speed limit on our road is 25 as we maintain fra class 2 track (with an appropriate amount of speed restrictions).  A top speed of 15 in a locomotive is truly too slow.  Our common trip speed usually peaks at 17-19 mph.  A locomotive should be able to handle peak speed without being at capacity.

Rob, fair warning again.  Your concept plans and design ideas are welcome, however any formal development would need board approval and would thereafter involve our in house volunteer engineer (mechanical and electrical engineers) team.  As you put time into this- be sure to keep the above in mind and keep your effort proportional to that condition.

Thanks,
Jason

Robert Hale

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Re: What If? Design Project: 1925-1940 2ft Diesel
« Reply #44 on: June 03, 2019, 03:10:31 PM »
I'll calculate the speed of the gearsets and see what comes out. Yes, I will do my best to have a good drawing/concept once I finish.

Rob