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Author Topic: An interesting narrative from WWI  (Read 571 times)
Ira Schreiber
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« on: January 05, 2017, 11:43:50 PM »

http://www.koala-creek.net/2012/11/running-an-engine-on-the-soixante/
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Glenn Christensen
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« Reply #1 on: January 06, 2017, 03:56:47 AM »

Thanks for sending the link!

I love the stories and I love those little trench trains!  The proportions are all wrong.  Who wouldn't like that!


Best Regards,
Glenn
(in Columbus, GA - The home of Fort Benning and a WW1 Davenport 2-6-2T)
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John Stone
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« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2017, 05:52:51 PM »

Really neat read! Thanks Ira! I love reading stories of hands-on railroading and this tale of how enginemen got by under the most brutal conditions is amazing. The thought of operating over uncertain track in unfamiliar territory with minimal brakes and no light is horrifying enough. Now have someone lobbing shells at you during the trip!

Maybe an idea for an extreme engineer experience program?

John
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Ken Fleming
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« Reply #3 on: January 07, 2017, 06:50:23 PM »

My father served in Battery B, 68th CAG in France.  Battery B had modified 6" naval guns and their shells were delivered by the "little trains" as they were called.  My father was a brakeman on the C.B.& Q. when he was drafted.  So the two-footers were interesting to him.
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