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Author Topic: January 2017 Work Planning  (Read 8278 times)
Stewart "Start" Rhine
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« Reply #15 on: January 10, 2017, 01:57:58 PM »

Additional photo special prep:

* Shop - Scrap wood was cleaned up around the #67 project.  This makes for safer walking through bay 2.

* Alna Center - Some of the wood from bay 2 was taken to AC for kindling the depot stove.  The telephone line was tested, the depot will be open to visitors during the train meets on Saturday.

* Kitchen - The crew spent a couple hours getting provisions for serving a hot lunch to the WW&F volunteers.
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Stewart "Start" Rhine
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« Reply #16 on: January 10, 2017, 11:43:29 PM »

Day #2 of the on-site prep for the photographers special.  There were 10 volunteers working at Sheepscot.

* Boxcar #67 - Zack set all the studs into the roof frame and installed the tension rods.

* Monson #3 - The engine was unloaded this afternoon and after a brief check was taken into the machine shop for further inspection and re-installation of the main rods.

* North yard - The track crew worked on the temporary woods track switch parts.

* Switching - More switching was done with the railcar going into shop bay 3 along with coach 8.

* Water tank - A small electric heater was installed in the pump house and a new kerosene heater was tested for use in the tank house.

* Kitchen - More food and drinks were brought in for this weekend.

* Shop - Many boxes of sorted bolts were taken out of bay 4 to make room.  The boxes are in bay 1 near Fred's Bolt Emporium.
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Joe Fox
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« Reply #17 on: January 11, 2017, 04:06:39 AM »

*Day 2 of final prep work. But there has been several days of other prep that has been done as well on site. And many nights of planning. Many thanks to everyone who has helped make sure these next two weekends are fantastic.
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James Patten
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« Reply #18 on: January 11, 2017, 12:00:48 PM »

Anticipated work for weekend of January 14, 2017

* Friday night board meeting
* Saturday and Sunday is the first of two winter photographic events.  Cameras are prohibited  Grin  There are events during both days and on Saturday night.
* Boxcar 67

The weekend promises to be cold, although after last night's rain and the warm temperatures coming up any snow that's left will be frozen solid. 
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Joe Fox
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« Reply #19 on: January 11, 2017, 01:10:41 PM »

The plowed in crossings will provide some interesting challenges when the line gets opened up again. If it doesn't get opened today we may need a crew to go out Friday to clean crossings, chip switches, and more. Do we have lots of rock salt around? We may need it.
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Jon Chase
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« Reply #20 on: January 11, 2017, 02:56:09 PM »

Joe, a word of caution about the use of rock salt.  I've personally worked on rebuilding (including near-complete replacement) of the lower vestibules and end decks on several standard-gauge heavyweight passenger cars at several preservation sites, all attributable to the corrosive effects of rock salt used on station platforms and crossings, and tracked onto the equipment over the years.  (I realize that in an ideal world it doesn't matter because WW&F will in due course replace all Edaville-applied steel car end platforms with proper wooden ones, but still....) Besides, salt can get tracked onto engine steps and decks just as easily, and hosing down may just have the effect of distributing salt water into inaccessible areas (ask Bill Sample about a certain baggage car).

I sometimes use a commercially-available propane burner on a hose (designed for roof work) to melt ice. Such a tool might be ideal for freeing up switch points and clearing flangeways.  Because the resulting product is water, damage to wooden ties and crossing planks would seem relatively minimal.       
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John McNamara
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« Reply #21 on: January 11, 2017, 06:08:45 PM »

I sometimes use a commercially-available propane burner on a hose (designed for roof work) to melt ice. Such a tool might be ideal for freeing up switch points and clearing flangeways.  Because the resulting product is water, damage to wooden ties and crossing planks would seem relatively minimal.       
Funny, I was just thinking about that on my every-so-often walk around the neighborhood. I was thinking of adding a blower or pump to get rid of the water, but that seems to be one-plussing the design a bit too much. Since the end product would probably be more like a slushy water, a broom would probably suffice.

Do you have a specific product, a Sthil 23987128, in mind?

-John
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Jon Chase
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« Reply #22 on: January 11, 2017, 07:29:04 PM »

Do you have a specific product, a Sthil 23987128, in mind?
-John

McMaster-Carr # 78265A41, "Propane Torch With Extended Handle"   

A little pricey at $92, but if a source for the large burner head itself could be found, the rest could easily be made from fittings.  I've used this device for tasks ranging from to melting ice, to re-melting asphalt pavement.  I use a propane-grill size tank, but a larger tank might be useful for extended work periods.       
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John McNamara
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« Reply #23 on: January 11, 2017, 07:35:07 PM »

Thanks! With our increased number of winter operations, it might be worth trying this.
-John M
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Jason M Lamontagne
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« Reply #24 on: January 11, 2017, 08:38:06 PM »

We have a weed burner- which is essentially the same thing.  In fact when you search "weed burner" it pulls up this exact item number.  We've never tried it on crossings or switches in the winter- on advice that such efforts only melt the very surface, which refreezes immediately. In other words there's such a thermal mass to heat that no flame may be up to the task.

That said, that's only hear say and there's no loss in trying.  Chipping crossings is the worst part of winter ops- so next time we're faced with it, I'm perfectly game to grab our weed burner and give this a shot.

See ya
Jason
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John Kokas
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« Reply #25 on: January 11, 2017, 08:48:06 PM »

Jason,

Use the weed-burner, I have on shortline applications for Santa trains in the past. Just don't hold it in one spot too long (especially with creosoted ties) you may end up with an unexpected surprise.   Wink  In all seriousness, I've never had a problem and its soo much easier than chopping.  Use 20 lb propane tanks, 30's get real heavy real quick.  Lastly, have one or two spares on the MOW train since you'll always run out of gas in the middle of nowhere.

Best of luck on the photo excursions, wish I could be there.
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Gordon Cook
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« Reply #26 on: January 11, 2017, 09:32:15 PM »

I bet the trick is to play the flame on the ice long enough to at least warm it up, then it becomes much softer and easier to chip out.
The warm spell today and tomorrow should help too.

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« Reply #27 on: January 12, 2017, 12:12:26 AM »

Little Electric jack hammer may do something..
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Mike
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« Reply #28 on: January 12, 2017, 12:43:20 AM »

Someone may want to talk to the folks at the Nevada Northern Railway Museum.   They probably have more switches than the WW&F has just in their yard alone.   They put on winter photo shoots twice every February and keeping the switches clean is indeed a continuing problem.  I believe I do recall seeing them using torches of some sort....along with a myriad of other things (shovels, ice picks, brooms).    It is important work.  I've seen several derailments happen at NN as well as up at Sumpter Valley due to ice jams.  No equipment or people hurt, but it made for a lot of work cleaning up.   

Matthew Malkiewicz, Jim Wrinn and myself were in a caboose that ended up about 30 degrees off the track alignment in February of 2014 up at Sumpter.....this despite the railroad guys spending a significant amount of time clearing ice jams the day before.   The train was running in reverse (as photo trains often do) and that lightweight caboose suddenly hopped off the rails.   Fortunately, the three of us felt the rough ride over the mile or so leading up to the event and we had prepared for that eventuality.   We elected Jim to dump the air because he was the tallest and could easily reach the brake valve.   When Matthew called out "we're off", Jim calmly turned the valve handle and we stopped very quickly.   Darn good thing we did.  We were on a fill at the time and if the train had continued, we likely would have tumbled down the embankment.  As it was, there were no bumps or bruises and the Sumpter guys had the caboose back on the rails damage-free that afternoon.   
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Joe Fox
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« Reply #29 on: January 12, 2017, 01:05:51 AM »

Keeping things clear can be a pain, but we try to make sure any area that may be a problem gets cleaned out. When plowing we often stop before the crossings to make sure the flange ways are clear of ice.
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