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Author Topic: W&Q Railroad Acquired by CP  (Read 2952 times)
Ed Lecuyer
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« on: April 01, 2016, 01:39:41 PM »

APRIL 1, 2016 - In a surprise move to create North America's first transcontinental railroad empire, Canadian Pacific Railroad announced today its acquisition of the Wiscasset and Quebec Railroad.

"With the opening of the widened Panama Canal, we have identified the strategic importance of the vastly underutilized port of Wiscasset" said CP CEO Hunter Harrison. "Acquiring the Wiscasset and Quebec charter and assets gives us easy access to this new market." He noted that since the W&Q was never abandoned, and a track gauge not specified in the charter, construction of the railroad will avoid many obstacles usually preventing new rail lines.

Under the terms of the agreement, current lessor of the W&Q, the WW&F Railway Museum of Alna, Maine will expand its narrow gauge operations on the route – utilizing dual-gauge track from Wiscasset to Head Tide. WW&F volunteer Glenn Christensen mused of the museum expanded holiday operations: "At Head Tide station, in fading light of a cold winter's day, horses, carriages and even a few jitneys, await the arrival of the train from Wiscasset.  The evening promises warm spiced cider, seasonal treats and joyous Christmas caroling at the Head Tide church."

WW&F CMO Jason Lamontagne has been given the new title of heritage operations director for the new railroad. He will oversee the restoration of a fleet of CP steam locomotives, all streamlined and dressed in CP's traditional maroon and gold livery. "Ever since my daughter Amelia has become enamored with the useful engines on the Isle of Sodor,  I have become quite fond of modern streamlined power painted in bright, gaudy colors" stated Lamontagne, before running from the podium towards a bathroom, apparently to vomit.

The new railroad will combine its existing names to be known as the Wiscasset, Quebec and Pacific Railway. While terms of the deal were not disclosed, the officers of the Winter Scientific Institute, former owners of the W&Q assets, were heard weeping.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2016, 02:11:22 PM by Ed Lecuyer » Logged

Ed Lecuyer
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Glenn Christensen
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« Reply #1 on: April 01, 2016, 01:47:22 PM »

WOW!

I didn't see THAT coming!  What could possibly follow THAT!?!?!?


Grins,
Glenn
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Stewart "Start" Rhine
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« Reply #2 on: April 01, 2016, 01:55:28 PM »

You forgot to mention building a fleet of new two foot gauge Baldwin style 2-6-2 locomotives.
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Bill Baskerville
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« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2016, 02:06:56 PM »

I am sure the management of NS will be relieved that CP is no longer pursuing their empire.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2016, 02:10:29 PM by Ed Lecuyer » Logged
Glenn Christensen
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« Reply #4 on: April 01, 2016, 06:03:07 PM »

Hi Ed and Bill,

My guess is CP dropped NS like a hot potato when they found out they could do business with the WW&F.  Once they succumb to REALITY and GIVE us their interest, THEN we begiin resettling Jason's stomach and can start on the NS acquisition ...


Grins,
Glenn

PS - "Start" ... I like the way you think ...
« Last Edit: April 01, 2016, 06:12:23 PM by Glenn Christensen » Logged
Carl Soderstrom
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« Reply #5 on: April 02, 2016, 05:52:43 AM »

Rather than dual gauge - 2 foot trucks that would slip under
the broad gauge trucks.
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Ed Lecuyer
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« Reply #6 on: April 02, 2016, 04:39:35 PM »

I thought about swapping trucks, or maybe using 2-foot gauge double-stack containers....

...but I figured those ideas would be ridiculous.

Happy April Fools Day everyone,

-Ed
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Ed Lecuyer
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Wayne Laepple
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« Reply #7 on: April 02, 2016, 07:18:49 PM »

The Brits and the Germans, at least, had systems to load entire standard gage cars, wheels and all, onto narrow gauge trucks. There are videos around somewhere showing how it was done.
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Brendan Barry
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« Reply #8 on: April 02, 2016, 10:19:27 PM »

Polish narrow gauge loading and transporting standard gauge cars.

https://youtu.be/f54OSRMetxA
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Ira Schreiber
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« Reply #9 on: April 03, 2016, 04:52:49 AM »

I watched it being done in Switzerland, too.
« Last Edit: April 03, 2016, 05:09:33 AM by Ira Schreiber » Logged
Glenn Christensen
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« Reply #10 on: April 03, 2016, 05:26:40 AM »

Hi Guys,

An interesting factoid - Actual operating experience in Europe, South American and probably other places too, determined that the narrowest track gauge sustainable for regularly transporting small standard gauge equipment was roughly 30"/750mm/760mm.  Two foot was OK for narrower-than-standard-gauge-equipment, like 3' and (maybe) meter gauge, but nothing wider.  That is why the Cubans were able to modify 3' gauge locomotives to run reliably on 27-3/4" (700mm?) gauge track at "Centrals" Simon Bolivar and Obdulio Morales.

That is probably also why 30' gauge saw more deployment world-wide than did 2'/(610mm) gauge.


Best Regards,
Glenn
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Philip Marshall
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« Reply #11 on: April 03, 2016, 08:31:18 AM »

Probably the most famous UK example of moving standard gauge cars on narrow gauge "transporter wagons" was the 30" gauge Leek & Manifold:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XY7rNorLoBw


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Glenn Christensen
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« Reply #12 on: April 03, 2016, 01:01:55 PM »

RIGHT ON, Philip!

Glenn
« Last Edit: April 03, 2016, 01:03:57 PM by Glenn Christensen » Logged
Ira Schreiber
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« Reply #13 on: April 03, 2016, 04:19:20 PM »

The East Broad Top (3') regularly carried standard gauge cars by swapping trucks at Mt. Union.
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Stewart "Start" Rhine
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« Reply #14 on: April 03, 2016, 04:48:49 PM »

Yes, the truck swap was done at the Timber Transfer at Mt. Union.  Standard Gauge cars were usually hauled on the head pin.
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