Author Topic: Propane forge  (Read 5704 times)

Brendan Barry

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Propane forge
« on: September 16, 2015, 07:43:52 PM »
The shop crew built a propane forge out of an old spike keg this week to heat rivets.



United Timber Bridge Workers, Local 1894, Alna, ME

Mike Fox

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Re: Propane forge
« Reply #1 on: September 16, 2015, 07:47:11 PM »
Quite crafty, and a lot faster than the coal.
Mike
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Alan Downey

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Re: Propane forge
« Reply #2 on: September 17, 2015, 06:29:34 PM »
Okay, I'll bite...

What's getting riveted? I'm guessing tank hardware...
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John Kokas

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Re: Propane forge
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2015, 06:32:20 PM »
Brendan,

Your pictures are absolutely riveting, riveting I say !!!!!!!!  ;D
Moxie Bootlegger

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: Propane forge
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2015, 07:17:45 PM »
Hi Alan,

Rivets are for the new switch frogs, the frog and guide rails are riveted to the lower plate.

Alan Downey

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Re: Propane forge
« Reply #5 on: September 17, 2015, 07:19:05 PM »
Thanks for the info, Stewart!
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Dave Crow

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Re: Propane forge
« Reply #6 on: September 18, 2015, 07:39:31 AM »
So... how do they look so far?

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: Propane forge
« Reply #7 on: September 18, 2015, 09:42:25 AM »
Rivet holes are about 2/3 drilled.

Dave your machine work is top notch and will fit the bill just fine- thank you!

See ya
Jason

Dave Crow

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Re: Propane forge
« Reply #8 on: September 18, 2015, 09:48:03 AM »
Thanks, Jason!  Still looking forward to seeing how the frog parts look when riveted to the base plates!

Paul Uhland

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Re: Propane forge
« Reply #9 on: September 18, 2015, 01:15:46 PM »
Permanent mounting plates for frog elements seems to be current trackbuilding protocol.
Beats buying expensive one-piece castings, I'm sure.
 
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Dave Crow

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Re: Propane forge
« Reply #10 on: September 18, 2015, 02:16:42 PM »
I think we're hoping it's easier to assemble and maintain alignment as compared to frogs where all the pieces are bolted together, especially the all-thread with spacers to keep the wing rails spaced from the frog point segments.  The 33-pound rail doesn't leave a lot of room for hefty bolts or threaded rod through the web of the rail without interfering with wheel flanges.

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: Propane forge
« Reply #11 on: September 18, 2015, 03:05:33 PM »
From my perspective the reason was ease of manufacture with avoiding the tight tolerance bending of wing rails and custom fitting of the cast iron frog blocks used in the rigid bolted frogs.  We made those patterns and haven't actually had problems with flanges hitting either the blocks or the bolts, even on the small rail.  In the end- we can indeed get away with less accurate wing rail bends and we (obviously) avoided the block fitting- but there are a lot of holes to drill for rivers.  41 per frog.  They are being drilled at 15 degrees so as to come perpendicular to the top side of the rail base, and so the hole is further from the edge of the base.  I believe the riveting shall be efficient but we aren't there yet.  In short- of the two choices for frog design (solid cast not being a practical option) there are places for rigid bolted frogs, and places for riveted plate frogs.  I suspect we'll keep the plate frogs off the main, for example.

See ya
Jason

John Kokas

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Re: Propane forge
« Reply #12 on: September 19, 2015, 07:28:24 AM »
If possible it would be really neat to have a sequence of photos as part of a "how-to" put a frog/switch together.  A definite for the newsletter but also in the future as a display for visitors.
Moxie Bootlegger

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: Propane forge
« Reply #13 on: September 19, 2015, 08:07:46 AM »
Funny- I wrote a college paper once on two foot gauge switch construction.  Fat chance of finding it.  Guess it's in my head anyway.

Biggest difference to standard gauge is that we do the geometric (actually more trigonometric) layout ourselves as there's no two foot standard layouts out there.  During construction there's a particular order of operations which minimizes error in matching the mathematical solution.

See ya
Jason