Author Topic: Trout Brook Bridge - Official Work Thread  (Read 5717 times)

Ed Lecuyer

  • Administrator
  • Supervisor
  • *****
  • Posts: 1,815
    • View Profile
    • Historical Topo Maps
Re: Trout Brook Bridge - Official Work Thread
« Reply #150 on: October 11, 2017, 01:45:28 AM »
All of the wood timbers were replaced.
I believe that most (if not all) of the steel rods, castings, bolts, etc. were saved, reconditioned, and repaired.
Ed Lecuyer
Moderator, WW&F Forum

Alex Harvilchuck

  • Museum Member
  • Switchman
  • **
  • Posts: 85
    • View Profile
Re: Trout Brook Bridge - Official Work Thread
« Reply #151 on: October 11, 2017, 02:12:02 AM »
All of the wood timbers were replaced.
I believe that most (if not all) of the steel rods, castings, bolts, etc. were saved, reconditioned, and repaired.

All wood has been replaced, a few of the cast iron nodes were cracked and brazed, two nuts were made brand new...the rest of the metal is original.

Alex Harvilchuck

  • Museum Member
  • Switchman
  • **
  • Posts: 85
    • View Profile
Re: Trout Brook Bridge - Official Work Thread
« Reply #152 on: October 11, 2017, 02:15:07 AM »
Jason reports and supplied the pictures..

"Today we laid out 4 rows of cribbing, carefully leveled them, and placed the 4 chords in preparation of building the trusses.  They’ll be built on their side, prepped, and tipped inward until upright.  then the floor timbers will be brought in and attached from underneath"

The cast iron nodes are the most ingenious part of the design, it allows for rapid on-site assembly of pre-fabricated parts like a jig-saw puzzle. 

Jason M Lamontagne

  • Operating Volunteers
  • Conductor
  • *****
  • Posts: 896
    • View Profile
Re: Trout Brook Bridge - Official Work Thread
« Reply #153 on: October 11, 2017, 09:24:45 AM »
Helping lay out the bridge assembly yesterday, some construction details became evident.

To Alax’s Comment, it’s amazing what was considered “quick on site work.”  All of the nodes are let into the chord timbers in exacting fashion, so they bear evenly.  Further- the nodes on the top chords are spaced farther apart than those in the bottom, on account of truss camber (slight arching of the truss).  The increase in spacing is something like 3/16” each.  This was part of the study in Cleveland, I understand.

I believe Alex is right that the nodes allowed quick on site work.  After all, the alternative was a slew of very intricate timber frame joints. 

See ya
Jason

Alex Harvilchuck

  • Museum Member
  • Switchman
  • **
  • Posts: 85
    • View Profile
Re: Trout Brook Bridge - Official Work Thread
« Reply #154 on: October 11, 2017, 11:39:56 AM »
I believe Alex is right that the nodes allowed quick on site work.  After all, the alternative was a slew of very intricate timber frame joints. 

I'll point everyone back to the story on Facebook, but the routine assembly speed was 200' of bridging in 2 days.

Mike Fox

  • Museum Member
  • Superintendent
  • ********
  • Posts: 3,254
    • View Profile
Re: Trout Brook Bridge - Official Work Thread
« Reply #155 on: October 23, 2017, 06:16:07 PM »
Jason supplied this picture, showing the progress today..

Mike
Doing way too much to list...

Wayne Laepple

  • Museum Member
  • Inspector
  • ******
  • Posts: 1,276
    • View Profile
Re: Trout Brook Bridge - Official Work Thread
« Reply #156 on: October 23, 2017, 07:09:09 PM »
Wow! Color me impressed!

Bill Baskerville

  • Museum Member
  • Fireman
  • ****
  • Posts: 349
    • View Profile
Re: Trout Brook Bridge - Official Work Thread
« Reply #157 on: October 23, 2017, 07:14:43 PM »
In perspective of the picture, Steve never looked so small and dainty.

Steve Zuppa

  • Museum Member
  • Switchman
  • **
  • Posts: 68
    • View Profile
Re: Trout Brook Bridge - Official Work Thread
« Reply #158 on: October 23, 2017, 07:43:41 PM »
Thank you, Bill. I was going for "svelte" but I think that ship has sailed. All kidding aside, we made some nice progress today.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2017, 07:59:06 PM by Steve Zuppa »