Author Topic: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread  (Read 36975 times)

Brendan Barry

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Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2015, 05:23:32 AM »
The shingle mill. You can see the drive belt coming down from the line shaft.









Looking down on the mill from line shaft.



The belt under tension drives the shingle mill and the loose belt on the right goes to the engine to drive the line shaft.



Line shaft pulley for the mill.



Line shaft pulley for the engine is in the foreground. Next pulley drives the edger and there is a smaller pulley behind it for the saw dust blower. Pulley farthest away drives the cut off saw.



This is the cut off saw. Logs came in on wooden rollers that we saved on the frame going through the door on the right. The log would be pushed up to the post on the left and a bolt sawed off for the shingle mill. The cut off saw just hangs and pivots off the line shaft. The wood box to the left behind the ladder is the edger used to make the shingles square.









Cut off saw pivot on the line shaft.





The engine resides in a steel lined room in the back corner of the building.





Engine pto and drive belt pulley sticks through a hole in the engine room wall.





General inside pictures. Remember about 12 pickup loads of stuff have come out of here and half a 20 yard dumpster filled up. My first visit was on the second clean out trip and you couldn't see the floor. The black box is a WWII vintage hobart generator that was buried in the building.











Building pictures the grey color blocks out the identifiable location details in the background.





Sawdust conveyor.







Pipe sticking out over the double doors is the engine exhaust.







Open door in the side of the building is where logs fed into the building to the chop saw.






Philip Marshall

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Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2015, 06:15:56 AM »
Wow, what a place! Thank you for posting these pictures, Brendan -- and thank you also for taking the trouble to conceal the location!

I saw a shingle mill demonstration once at an antique engine show in New York State about 15 years ago. It was really impressive to watch (and more than a little frightening with that big circular saw blade spinning just inches from the operator's fingers), but the machine by itself had no historical context. I really hope we can recreate some of the atmosphere of the original mill building at the museum.

-Philip Marshall.

Terry Harper

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Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
« Reply #17 on: May 11, 2015, 10:48:39 AM »
What a great project and addition to the WW&F!

I can see this rig setup in a small clearing with a nice pile of cedar logs and that wonderful aroma only a shingle mill can have.
That well maintained Continental Red Seal is a treasure in itself.

Most fantastic!

Best regards,

Terry

Paul Uhland

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Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
« Reply #18 on: May 11, 2015, 05:28:32 PM »
Tnx for the thorough pic coverage.
It's obvious this mill was run by the CIA, hence the grayed-out surroundings!    ;D

Seriously, looks like a lot of grunt work went into just uncovering  salvageable building contents.
The building is beyond rehab, would be a mega-hassle to move, I'm sure.

Relocating, storing the mill, motor, corrugated steel sheets back to Sheepscot will be interesting.
How many miles are involved?

« Last Edit: May 11, 2015, 10:35:49 PM by Paul Uhland »
Paul Uhland

Philip Marshall

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Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
« Reply #19 on: May 12, 2015, 01:08:08 AM »
Here's a nice video of a similar mill in action, I believe in Liberty, Maine. (Watch those fingers!)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpd3ZOoI7kk

-Philip Marshall

Mike Fox

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Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
« Reply #20 on: May 12, 2015, 01:12:52 AM »
Paul, about 55 road miles, most good highway driving though. A touch over an hour.
Mike
Doing way too much to list...

Glenn Christensen

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Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
« Reply #21 on: May 12, 2015, 02:21:31 AM »
Great video Phillip! 


Thanks,
Glenn

Greg Klein

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Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
« Reply #22 on: May 12, 2015, 01:29:16 PM »
Fascinating!  I get the same feeling as standing on the edge of a tall building whenever he reaches toward the blade to grab the cut shingle.  I could zone out and watch that for hours!

Wayne Laepple

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Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
« Reply #23 on: May 12, 2015, 10:58:12 PM »
Okay, no one else has asked and I'm dying to know. Where is all this good stuff going to be stored until it gets set up in some yet-to-be determined location?

Dave Buczkowski

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Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
« Reply #24 on: May 13, 2015, 03:08:18 AM »
Bay 2 when No. 9's cab moves out.

Mike Fox

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Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
« Reply #25 on: May 13, 2015, 12:58:19 PM »
I would hate to see some of the best work space we have to be used as storage. I would like to see it stored in the south east corner of the car barn, once weather proof.
Mike
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James Patten

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Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
« Reply #26 on: May 13, 2015, 01:58:19 PM »
I think the large items are being stored off site until we're ready for them.

Dave Buczkowski

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Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
« Reply #27 on: May 13, 2015, 04:44:35 PM »
James;
Not offsite where I was originally told they would be stored. That offer was withdrawn.
Dave

Dana Deering

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Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
« Reply #28 on: May 15, 2015, 06:38:49 PM »
Excellent photos, Brendan.  Thank you for doing your best to conceal clues about the location.  This gives the rest of the volunteers a chance to see what a unique gift we've been entrusted with.  At this point I am on pins and needles trying not to worry too much about the mill being disturbed or damaged before we get it moved.  We had a couple of unauthorized "visitors" show up on the 9th and I had one ask a lot of questions and I gave him no real answers but I'm afraid the word might start to leak out.

Anyway, there was a lot of just plain trash in that little building and I can't say thank you enough to the guys who have helped with the clean up so far.  We're at the point now where we can plan and carry put the moving of the machinery and the sooner the better.  Once we get it to Sheepscot it has to be kept protected under cover.  It is in too good a shape to allow it to deteriorate.

Once the machinery has been moved and restoration work is underway we'll need to start planning its new home.   This will be a real positive addition to the Museum and a great tribute to the former owner (who was also an infantryman in the Second World War and who was part of the first of the American forces to reach and liberate the Dachau (sp?) concentration camp.  He told me about that experience.  Wow.).

I'm glad that the photos were posted so you can a sense of the mill.  Now on to the next phase,

Dana

John Kokas

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Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
« Reply #29 on: May 15, 2015, 10:44:28 PM »
Dana,

Did our "benefactor" state which unit he was with in WWII?  My uncle was at Dachau also, I wonder if they might have met.  As a retired military member myself, I would love the opportunity to talk with him and maybe swap some war stories.