Author Topic: 23"? Heavyweight  (Read 6277 times)

Ira Schreiber

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John Stone

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Re: 23"? Heavyweight
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2014, 04:23:08 PM »
I've seen this engine in the 1941 locomotive cyclopedia. Quite the little brute! I believe she puts more weight on two axles than S.R.&R.L. #23 put on five engine and four tender axles. I take it she's somewhere in the Youngstown area. If they ever restore her to operating condition and take her on the road, perhaps the W.W.&F. would be prudent to graciously decline a visit. 23 inches wouldn't track well and no telling what she'd do to tiny rail!

Nice find, Ira!

Ira Schreiber

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Re: 23"? Heavyweight
« Reply #2 on: December 04, 2014, 04:32:16 PM »
Some more information from Railway Preservatiion News today.

http://www.rypn.org/forums/viewtopic.php?f=1&t=37393&sid=7b1cc08225ce1cf8a6d34726f0d0319d

Philip Marshall

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Re: 23"? Heavyweight
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2014, 07:59:59 PM »
I see her new owner, Rick Rowlands, says he's going to place her on 100-lb rail.

John is right, the WW&F should graciously decline a visit if offered! 46.5 tons on two axles is no joke.

Wayne Laepple

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Re: 23"? Heavyweight
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2014, 10:02:10 PM »
With a locomotive like this, who needs a tamper! This thing is a serious track-squasher.

Rick Rowlands

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Re: 23"? Heavyweight
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2014, 12:19:05 AM »
Yes, we are going to be restoring the 58 to her original 93,000 lb. self again.  We have plans to construct a 23" gauge steel mill demonstration railroad at the Youngstown Steel Heritage Museum in Youngstown, OH.  The first 80 feet of track, which is mostly built, is of 100 lb. RB rail, mainly because that is what i had laying around the property.  I will comp. down to 85 lb. ASCE for the rest of the railroad as I can find 85 lb. No.4 switches and it will still support the axle loadings. 

The original 23" gauge operation that this locomotive was used on was at the Jones & Laughlin Steel Co. Pittsburgh Works.  It moved ingot mold cars around, which are extremely heavy.  I want to build a train of heavy flats with ingot molds so that we can replicate that part of steel industry rail operations.  This type of two foot railroading is about as far from the lighter, more typical two footers as you can get. 

Thanks to a tip from Wayne Laepple, I visited Kovalchick's Salvage in Burnham, PA on Thursday and found literally a pile of 23" gauge flatcars that were originally from Carpenter Steel.  I am trying to get a price on them, and if the price is reasonable I may buy a couple.  An alternative is to construct our own cars based upon the Carpenter design, but beefed up somewhat. 

The 58 is due to arrive on the property soon, with boiler work taking place over the winter and spring.  By summer we should have the boiler back on and be ready to test fire. Tank and cab reconstruction will take longer.  Track construction and car fabrication/acquisition will take place as time permits.  We also have to get new ingot molds cast for us.  Fortunately the last ingot mold maker in the US is five miles away and the company is already a contributor to our museum, so maybe we won't have much expense in getting those. 

https://flic.kr/p/qhnyq3
This is a similar narrow gauge ingot mold operation at the US Steel Homestead Works.

https://flic.kr/p/qjmjWD
This is our trackplan.  Red is track already built.  Blue is track to be built.





« Last Edit: December 07, 2014, 12:21:49 AM by Rick Rowlands »
Rick Rowlands
Chief Engineer
Jones & Laughlin Narrow Gauge Railway
Youngstown, OH

Rick Rowlands

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Re: 23"? Heavyweight
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2014, 12:25:11 AM »
https://flic.kr/p/qiqdTP
The pile of Carpenter Steel 23" gauge cars at Kovalchick Salvage.
Rick Rowlands
Chief Engineer
Jones & Laughlin Narrow Gauge Railway
Youngstown, OH

John Stone

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Re: 23"? Heavyweight
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2014, 01:10:12 AM »
How did they ever arrive at a 23" gauge?

Philip Marshall

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Re: 23"? Heavyweight
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2014, 01:54:34 AM »
Congratulations on the acquisition, Rick! That's some really neat equipment.

James Patten

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Re: 23"? Heavyweight
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2014, 02:10:40 AM »
And why is our Carpenter Steel diesel engine 24" gauge and not 23"?

John Stone

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Re: 23"? Heavyweight
« Reply #10 on: December 07, 2014, 02:32:56 AM »
Climate?

Philip Marshall

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Re: 23"? Heavyweight
« Reply #11 on: December 07, 2014, 03:42:46 AM »
So all narrow gauge equipment magically becomes two foot gauge when it arrives in the State of Maine?  :)
« Last Edit: December 07, 2014, 04:15:03 AM by Philip Marshall »

John Stone

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Re: 23"? Heavyweight
« Reply #12 on: December 07, 2014, 04:10:36 AM »
I think that's an experiment worth trying!

Rick Rowlands

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Re: 23"? Heavyweight
« Reply #13 on: December 11, 2014, 05:03:26 AM »
Perhaps the cars at Kovalchick are not from Carpenter.
Rick Rowlands
Chief Engineer
Jones & Laughlin Narrow Gauge Railway
Youngstown, OH