Author Topic: A lesson for our haulers or how not to do it.  (Read 2865 times)

Ira Schreiber

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John Stone

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Re: A lesson for our haulers or how not to do it.
« Reply #1 on: May 26, 2014, 06:31:24 PM »
Probably the result of gravity switching.

James Patten

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Re: A lesson for our haulers or how not to do it.
« Reply #2 on: May 26, 2014, 09:35:26 PM »
Understatement of day: "...the chap who looks after it was a bit distraught..."

Mike Fox

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Re: A lesson for our haulers or how not to do it.
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2014, 12:36:28 AM »
Well, it states they rebuilt it from a wrecked condition once, guess they get to do it again.

I have seen a lot of things happen doing my job, had a chain go flying by me one time as it broke because an "operator" was "helping" me unchain his equipment. All I wanted him to do was pull ahead to get some slack in the chain. He went full throttle with the motor, and for some reason when he stepped on the brake it went backwards. One chain broke (I had it cross chained (like an X for those unfamiliar)) and the machine lurched to the side. He stopped. Shaking like a leaf. So we tried it again and again he went full throttle. I hollered at him that time and told him that everything is done on my trailer at an idle when possible. So he idled it ahead and I took the other chain off without difficulty.

I did also slide an excavator off my trailer while I was loading it. Steel on frost is not good. I knew I wasn't dropping far so I was ready for the ride. Just rode it out and hoped that nothing broke.
Mike
Doing way too much to list...

John Stone

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Re: A lesson for our haulers or how not to do it.
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2014, 12:42:53 AM »
Yeah, heavy stuff has a mind of its' own. Once it starts to go, better not be in the way! I once saw a steam derrick break a sling when it was attempting to lift a loaded N&W covered hopper. Fortunately, everyone was well in the clear and the loose end of the cable was short. EVERYBODY hit the ground at once! The car sat straight back down.

Pete "Cosmo" Barrington

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Re: A lesson for our haulers or how not to do it.
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2014, 04:49:26 AM »
The very last episode of the Ken Burns film: "The War" has some rather unnerving shots of US "Sherman" tanks and at least one M-14 "Wolverine" tank destroyer sliding on ice somewhere around either the Ardennes or Hurtgen forest. Amazing how something that heavy can slide around like that.