Author Topic: Early Days of Welsh Steam Preservation  (Read 2254 times)

Steve Smith

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Early Days of Welsh Steam Preservation
« on: February 28, 2014, 03:14:13 AM »
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XlEon7zclXE

This clip isn’t exclusively devoted to Welsh two-footers, although a good sized fraction of it is. Although the picture quality is poor, this clip has an hour or so footage from the early days of slate quarry and steam narrow gauge operation in Wales, and the beginnings of preservation of the Festiniog. From the narrator you can learn how to pronounce Porthmadog and some other Welsh names. Among the railways on which steam operation is shown are the Snowden Mountain (a rack railway), Festiniog, Talyllyn, Vale of Rheidol, Welshpool, and Isle of Mann railways, and the miniature lines Ravenglass and Eskdale and Romney Hythe and Dymchurch. The last half hour is mostly about a flock of early narrow gauge electric railways in southern England.

Philip Marshall

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Re: Early Days of Welsh Steam Preservation
« Reply #1 on: March 15, 2014, 05:35:29 AM »
What a great film! Thanks for sharing.

I'm confused about something in the Tallylyn segment, however. One of the ex-Corris engines looks like it's facing the "wrong" way. Does the Tallylyn have a turntable? I didn't think they ever turned their engines.

Nick Griffiths

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Re: Early Days of Welsh Steam Preservation
« Reply #2 on: March 15, 2014, 12:47:12 PM »
What a great film! Thanks for sharing.

I'm confused about something in the Tallylyn segment, however. One of the ex-Corris engines looks like it's facing the "wrong" way. Does the Tallylyn have a turntable? I didn't think they ever turned their engines.

The ex-Corris #3 was fitted with vacuum brakes - the brake cylinder (about 15" dia) was mounted above the cab floor obstructing access on the LH side, so the opening was plated over.  The platforms on the Corris were on the opposite side to the Talyllyn's so after delivery in 1951(?) the loco was orientated to access the platforms from the RH side.  AIUI the vacuum brake was removed fairly quickly, but the loco didn't see much service until the track had been largely relaid.  The tyres are quite narrow and it fell in a lot!

HTH,

Nick

Philip Marshall

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Re: Early Days of Welsh Steam Preservation
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2014, 06:37:25 PM »
That answers my question. Thanks, Nick.

-Philip