Author Topic: Edaville #11  (Read 10433 times)

John Stone

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #15 on: December 02, 2013, 02:15:00 PM »
I think I found a match for that whistle.

http://youtu.be/Ezz7y3J1C5o

Looks like that crew gets plenty of fresh air, too!

John

James Patten

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #16 on: December 02, 2013, 02:59:11 PM »
I suspect the windows were taken out for transit.

John Stone

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #17 on: December 02, 2013, 06:11:38 PM »
That makes sense. Looks as though they haven't installed the number glasses in the headlight, either.
I'm guessing they were very eager to try her out when they got her home. Comfort later!

Does anyone know if she is a coal burner?

John

Hansel Fardon

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #18 on: December 02, 2013, 06:50:19 PM »
They might not even bother with number boards. #4 didn't have them til a couple of years ago!
#21 usually wears the B&M 6-chime. But I've seen pictures of a B&M 3-chime on it (which would be a good sound for the little engine!).

Mark Spremulli

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #19 on: December 02, 2013, 11:08:02 PM »
That makes sense. Looks as though they haven't installed the number glasses in the headlight, either.
I'm guessing they were very eager to try her out when they got her home. Comfort later!

Does anyone know if she is a coal burner?

John

Yes she is

John Stone

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #20 on: December 03, 2013, 12:13:49 AM »
Thanks Mark.

I was fooled by the super clean exhaust in the video into thinking they'd gone propane . Must be using some of that Boothbay anthracite!

That whistle does convey a certain sense of urgency, though #21's melodious tones are more respectable.


John

Wayne Laepple

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #21 on: December 03, 2013, 12:33:41 AM »
Actually, that type of high-pitched chime whistle was probably used on No. 11 during its working life in the copper smelter. That sound would carry over the roaring, rumbling, clattering and other background sounds common in such places. And most small industrial locomotives were delivered from their manufacturers carrying small single-chamber whistles. Even WW&F 6 and 7 came from Baldwin with the Baldwin standard single note whistle, probably because it was less costly than a nice three chime Lunkenheimer. Almost every coal company Porter or Vulcan lokie I've ever seen (or heard) had a little hooter, not a chime whistle.

Mark Spremulli

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #22 on: December 03, 2013, 02:39:59 AM »
Actually, that type of high-pitched chime whistle was probably used on No. 11 during its working life in the copper smelter. That sound would carry over the roaring, rumbling, clattering and other background sounds common in such places. And most small industrial locomotives were delivered from their manufacturers carrying small single-chamber whistles. Even WW&F 6 and 7 came from Baldwin with the Baldwin standard single note whistle, probably because it was less costly than a nice three chime Lunkenheimer. Almost every coal company Porter or Vulcan lokie I've ever seen (or heard) had a little hooter, not a chime whistle.

Wow, Thanks Wayne, I didn't know all of that, I learned something today. As much as its historically accurate, I still don't like the whistle.


John Stone

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #23 on: December 03, 2013, 03:31:42 AM »
Thank you, Wayne.

      The thought would have never entered my cluttered, noisy mind. Your explanation pierced the background noise (maybe tinnitus) like that shrill whistle in a factory setting!

      I'm curious, is the current chime whistle on #10 in line with what the W.W.&F engines had, or would they have had a single tone hooter?


      John

Hansel Fardon

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #24 on: December 03, 2013, 04:53:49 AM »
#10 had a single chime until recently. It currently wears a CNJ 3-chime replica made by a volunteer.

Hansel Fardon

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #25 on: December 03, 2013, 06:15:49 PM »
And speaking of whistles!,
Does #9's original whistle still exist?

John Stone

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #26 on: December 03, 2013, 09:55:02 PM »
Thanks for the words of whistle, Hansel.

Having spent my first 20 years in the "Garden State", I can certainly raise no objection to a CNJ sound! I think it is great that operating museums can give us sights and sounds not experienced for generations.

As for #9, I wonder if she carried the whistle she was equipped with on the S.R.&R.L.? Perhaps there was a standard Maine Central noise maker which made it on to it's subsidiary's power.

John

Bill Piche

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #27 on: December 03, 2013, 10:06:22 PM »
That whistle DOES grow on you (like a fungus).

But in all seriousness, I hope they put something a little bit larger (or at least deeper sounding) on there. I know the whole smaller boiler, bigger drain thing can be problematic, but who's to say a nice little 3 chime couldn't work on there.

I could be mistaken, but I don't think that the 3-chime that the #21 had a few years ago was Edaville's. I think that might have been on loan from somebody (don't ask me who, I don't have recollection beyond the borrowed part).

The clear smoke could be the result of light or very good firing. The 21 has a very clean stack in the video, too.

As for pulling power, I'm not so sure it would match up to Monson #3. Conrad's calculations would likely have taken into account the weight of the saddle tank that's no longer on the locomotive.

Something that I'm really impressed by is the quality of that rebuilt track. You barely see any roll in the train going over it.
Engineer/Fireman, MNGRR
"Any day with steam is a good day." - me

Wayne Laepple

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #28 on: December 03, 2013, 10:32:57 PM »
Looking at photos in "Two Feet to Tidewater," WW&F engines carried a variety of whistles. Many of them had single chamber hooters early on, but by the 20's, there seem to be quite a few chime whistles. No. 6, for example, appears with a small Baldwin standard single chamber whistle until about 1920, after which she carries a fairly large three-chime. No. 7 has a larger single chamber in her earlier days but is shown in later years with a chime whistle. No. 4 seems to have had a chime whistle from the get-go.

Bernie perch built the CNJ-pattern whistle currently on No. 10. He is involved in the CNJ No. 113 project here in Pennsylvania, and he made a number of whistles using measurements from a CNJ whistle. The one on No. 10 has a special languid plate to compensate for the engine's lower boiler pressure. Gordon Cook and I put the CNJ whistle on No. 10 in 2011.

Ira Schreiber

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #29 on: December 04, 2013, 01:27:20 AM »
And a fine whistle it is on #10.