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Author Topic: Kennebec Central locomotives  (Read 3395 times)
John Stone
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« on: November 13, 2013, 02:07:14 AM »

A question occurred to me the other day when I was perusing my limited 2 foot library. (small and ragged)
It is pretty well known, how #3 and #4 went by land to their short careers on the WW&F as #8 and #9. (Well, OK #9 took a vacation and will shortly embark on a long and glorious second phase!)
My question is; how did they get to the KC to begin with? For that matter, How did #1 and #2 get there?
I would guess floated, but perhaps some narrow minded fellow, broad of knowledge, can enlighten me.

John

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Bernie Perch
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« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2013, 02:16:12 AM »

John,

Of 3 & 4, one or both may have come in on the trolley line.  I read somewhere that the cylinder was broken in the transfer.  The current #9 has cylinder damage that could have happened at that time.  I stand corrected on all this statement.

Bernie
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John Stone
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« Reply #2 on: November 13, 2013, 02:23:41 AM »

Bernie

Thanks for the prompt response. I had never considered the trolley line. Makes a lot more sense than off loading them to a skiff for a voyage across the Kennebec.
Was the trolley line fairly close to the KC at Togus?

John
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Bernie Perch
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« Reply #3 on: November 13, 2013, 02:59:59 AM »

John,

Looking at a map in "Two Feet to Togus", it looks like about 200-300 feet.  The terminals were quite close.

Bernie
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John Stone
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« Reply #4 on: November 13, 2013, 01:19:47 PM »

Bernie

Thanks, once again. I looked longingly at that book last time I was at Sheepscott. Next time I'll have to make the jump!

John
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Stewart "Start" Rhine
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« Reply #5 on: November 13, 2013, 02:09:30 PM »

Hi John,

FYI - The museum gift shop does mail orders so you could get the book in time for Christmas. 
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Mike Fox
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« Reply #6 on: November 13, 2013, 11:39:10 PM »

I seem to remember something about them coming across the bridge from Gardiner. Perhaps I am mistaken, but thought I read that someplace...If this is correct, they would have been delivered by Maine Central, Farmington, Me. to Gardiner, Me. routing. I will look that up when I get a sec. Going to set my books out so I can look tonight.
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Mike
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James Patten
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« Reply #7 on: November 14, 2013, 12:32:51 AM »

I think that they were too heavy for the bridge over the Kennebec in Gardiner.
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Mike Fox
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« Reply #8 on: November 14, 2013, 02:18:58 AM »

Yes. That was a weak Wooden Bridge at the time. But I found the answer. The equipment was hauled across the Kennebec River on Ferries or ice in the winter, so it arrived in Gardiner.(Page 13 & 14, Two Feet to Togus). This is how it was done originally, can only assume that is how it was done for the Locomotives 3 & 4
« Last Edit: November 14, 2013, 02:20:35 AM by Mike Fox » Logged

Mike
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Bernie Perch
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« Reply #9 on: November 14, 2013, 10:20:24 PM »

Back to our "Two Feet to Togus" Bible Page 57 "(#3) The B&SR locomotive was brought across the Kennebec River from Gardiner to Randolph by barge on September 3, 1920."  Page 64: (#4) According to Ken Cain.........this engine was shipped to Augusta, where it was then taken over the electric railway to Togus.  At that point it was winched onto Kennebec Central rails over temporary trackage.  In the process, one of the cylinders was cracked, and T.W. Dick of Randolph was hired to make the necessary repairs.

Bernie
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Mike Fox
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« Reply #10 on: November 15, 2013, 12:35:24 AM »

Guess I did not read far enough again... Smiley
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Mike
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John Stone
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« Reply #11 on: November 15, 2013, 04:01:05 AM »

Thank to everyone,

I really didn't think there could be such plethora of Portland portage possibilities! There is much to Ponder! The story about the original engine(s) coming across the ice from Randolph reminds me of an old print in a book about the Pennsylvania which depicts coaches being hauled across temporary track laid on the ice-bound Susquehanna river at Havre De Grace, MD sometime during the 1840-50s. Cold winters, then! And braver men than I!

I will purchase Two Feet to Togus, probably on my next visit. Somehow it just feels right buying it in person!

John

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