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Author Topic: New steam locomotive at Edaville USA ?  (Read 21160 times)
Mike Fox
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« Reply #15 on: December 29, 2012, 11:39:38 PM »

I wonder if that photo is a couple of years old when they borrowed one of Boothbays locomotives?
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Mike
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Stewart "Start" Rhine
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« Reply #16 on: December 30, 2012, 12:30:33 AM »

I've heard that some people are looking to restore a UP 4000 and they need a place to run it.  Also, Edaville is going to have a new locomotive.  Hmmm, let's look at the clues.  If you put 2+2 together ya could get a 4-8-8-4

That's right, Edaville is gonna get a Bigboy! 

Case closed.
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Steve Smith
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« Reply #17 on: December 30, 2012, 01:57:48 AM »

I think I found out what was wrong. Here goes on Try No. 2:

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Stewart "Start" Rhine
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« Reply #18 on: December 30, 2012, 02:28:44 AM »

Nice little quarry engine.  It's so small it needs it's own panel track, what museum is it in ?
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Steve Smith
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« Reply #19 on: December 30, 2012, 02:34:06 AM »

Couldn't get the other two images to post. Very puzzling. Anyway, this Feldbahnlok happens to have been built by Krauss & Cie. of Munich, which later merged with Maffei to become Krauss-Maffei, whereas the one I photographed at Boothbay in 2003 had a Henschel nameplate. But the two are very similar in design. Many were built, and they were typically used for switching at industrial plants, and by  contractors at  large worksites.
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Steve Smith
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« Reply #20 on: December 30, 2012, 02:38:44 AM »

Stewart, it is in the transportation section of Das Deutsche Museum in Munich. That section is housed in three huge halls that were formerly used for trade fairs. The other part of the museum is on an island in the Isar river in another part of the city, and has a great section devoted to steam engines, and also a wonderful section on aviation.
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Richard "Steam" Symmes
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« Reply #21 on: December 30, 2012, 02:28:34 PM »

The pictured locomotive seems to have "outside" Stephenson Valve Gear.

Back in the 1960s there were a whole bunch of little German 2-footers brought over here. Some guy up in southern Maine had one in his backyard. One ended up in Marblehead, Mass.  There were a couple at the long gone "Steam Village" up in Gilford, NH. Boothbay had one (or more).  Most have changed owners several times and been scattered to the 4 winds.

Richard
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Wayne Laepple
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« Reply #22 on: December 30, 2012, 02:57:03 PM »

This thread has wandered away from its original subject, so I'll continue. In the 1890's, Baldwin built a lot little 0-4-0T engines similar to the Henschel and Krauss engines. They were, if you will, the forklift and dump truck of their day. All sorts of factories, breweries, mills, foundries, etc. used them for materials handling as their operations grew beyond the capacity of humans and animals to efficiently move materials from one place to another. At one point, Baldwin even had a leasing arm which leased a fleet of these little lokies by the month or year. Recently, one of these small engines was found somewhere in northern New Jersey and has been rescued. I believe it even carries a lease plate on its boiler.
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Richard "Steam" Symmes
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« Reply #23 on: December 30, 2012, 04:10:04 PM »

The S.D.Warren Co. locos were that sort of machine. I believe Baldwin built those.
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Steve Smith
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« Reply #24 on: December 30, 2012, 06:14:30 PM »

Wayne and Richard This is getting further off topic and inviting intervention from our moderator, but  perhaps members will appreciate a couple of looks at the outside Stephenson valve gear on the specimen in Munich.

One of the major reasons cited for the trend away from Stephenson toward Walschaert is that inside valve gear was in the way of structural bracing that became necessary as locomotives grew in size and loading. So one wonders why weren't more locomotives built with outside Stephenson gear.

The London Midland Scottish Railway built one of its 850 or so 4-6-0 "Black Fives" with outside Stephenson valve gear and the rest with Walschaerts. From some data I've seen the Stephenson-equipped loco held its own with the others re capability and availability, and even today it is well regarded by the volunteers of the North Yorkshire Moors Railway, which is where I believe I usually operates.



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Steve Smith
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« Reply #25 on: January 05, 2013, 03:46:43 AM »

Decided to post one more of the little Feldbahn loco. Some of us older members remember that song about "Oh, the railroad runs through the middle of the house." Here it's "Oh, the throttle rod runs through the middle of the sandbox."

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Ed Lecuyer
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« Reply #26 on: January 07, 2013, 05:14:49 PM »

Ed Delory asked me to post this picture of Edaville #6. It was taken at the now defunct Beaver Brook Farm in NH. I'm not sure where it is now.


* edaville _ 6.jpg (80.19 KB, 500x400 - viewed 1271 times.)
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Ed Lecuyer
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Wayne Laepple
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« Reply #27 on: January 07, 2013, 06:41:25 PM »

So, whatever happened to the equipment at Beaver Brook Farm? There were a couple of Plymouth locomotives and at least a couple authentic Maine pieces, as I recall.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2013, 08:47:20 PM by Wayne Laepple » Logged
Brendan Barry
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« Reply #28 on: January 07, 2013, 08:26:07 PM »

Last time I was over that way for work, most of the stuff looked like it was still sitting there.
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Mike Fox
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« Reply #29 on: January 07, 2013, 09:42:30 PM »

A quick fly over via google maps shows a diesel locomotive and a few cars sitting there. Hard to tell exactly and when the satelite image was updated.
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Mike
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