Author Topic: WW&F Roundhouse Fire  (Read 17003 times)

Josh Botting

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Re: WW&F Roundhouse Fire
« Reply #15 on: December 09, 2008, 12:07:32 AM »
Anyone ever considered an inert gas system?  Certainly more effective than a water based system, but a bit more hazardous to personal?


Steve Klare

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Re: WW&F Roundhouse Fire
« Reply #16 on: December 17, 2008, 08:59:32 PM »
Should it be that hot engines don't stay in the roundhouse?

These days with #52 you can pull a cold engine out of the stall and fire it up, and then later on when the fire is completely dead shove it back in. No fire in the firebox, no sparks, no roundhouse fires...

It's a choice that the original lines never had.

The downside is of course at the end of the day somebody has to hang around until the engine is cool.
« Last Edit: December 17, 2008, 09:06:20 PM by Steve Klare »

Mike Fox

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Re: WW&F Roundhouse Fire
« Reply #17 on: December 17, 2008, 09:10:02 PM »
Actually they have been dumping the fire at the end of the day already and I think that would still be the plan with the roundhouse. That way, no one needs to baby sit the engine.
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Stephen Hussar

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Re: WW&F Roundhouse Fire
« Reply #18 on: December 17, 2008, 09:43:39 PM »
Part of the museum's mission is, "to preserve and restore the operation of narrow gauge railroads and equipment in the Sheepscot Valley..."

If it is at all possible to build a roundhouse in such a way that steam locomotives can safely be brought up to steam indoors, and someday even be kept hot overnight, then that is what should be attempted. Why build a roundhouse with limitations? Every nuance of early 20th century railroad operation that can be experienced first hand helps tell the story better.

Steve Klare

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Re: WW&F Roundhouse Fire
« Reply #19 on: December 17, 2008, 09:59:51 PM »
True,

-but if I ever went out on a replica Viking warship, I'd still want a modern Personal Flotation Device under the seat!

(I'd definitely go with the helmet, though!)

Vincent "Lightning" LeRow

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Re: WW&F Roundhouse Fire
« Reply #20 on: December 17, 2008, 10:57:39 PM »
Quote
If it is at all possible to build a roundhouse in such a way that steam locomotives can safely be brought up to steam indoors, and someday even be kept hot overnight, then that is what should be attempted. Why build a roundhouse with limitations? Every nuance of early 20th century railroad operation that can be experienced first hand helps tell the story better.

Which is why we need a steel framed roundhouse with built in sprinkler systems AND retractable flues.  Of course we don't want to risk loosing our locomotives like the Origional RR did, that's why we take precautions to protect them.  Remember that the Origional RR couldn't instal a sprinkler system or build an all steel roundhouse with Board and batten siding or have retractable flues that come down right over the stack.  We have all of these options now that will make steaming up indoors a minimal risk. 

Besides, who wants to start a fire in the freezing rain and then wait for enough pressure to turn on the blowers to clear the cab?

I wouldn't, Especially when there's a nice roundhouse a few hundred feet from the parking lot!
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Stephen Hussar

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Re: WW&F Roundhouse Fire
« Reply #21 on: December 17, 2008, 11:25:59 PM »
Vincent, believe it or not all of this (including steel frame, fire supression, etc, etc), has all been thought out and discussed by the board. So no worries!

Mike Fox

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Re: WW&F Roundhouse Fire
« Reply #22 on: December 18, 2008, 01:10:33 AM »
I do think we have a great bunch of "thinkers", on here and on the board. A lot of the fire retarding things we have now was not available 100 years ago. The real trick will be making it look like it belonged back in the day. Stewart is going to have to get creative with his paint can. (Waterbased paint of course)
Mike
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Joe Fox

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Re: WW&F Roundhouse Fire
« Reply #23 on: June 14, 2013, 10:18:34 PM »
I know this is a late post, but here goes nothing.

Even though having a wooden roundhouse would pose difficultys, but there are many operating wooden roundhouses with operating steam. Things that could be done could include metal spark deflectors on the cielings. This would include the stall where the 52 would be. At Conway Scenic they have a spark deflector on the cieling for the diesels, and a sprinkler system. I believe that doing this would eliminate much risk of fires.

Looking into history, you will find that 90% of roundhouse fires occured at night. With the way the museum stores it's engines by dumping the fire before going in the building, and a stack cover on the stack, there is no fire in the engine during the night.