Author Topic: Roster of Surviving Maine 2' Locomotives  (Read 15949 times)

Scot Lawrence

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Re: Roster of Surviving Maine 2' Locomotives
« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2010, 11:55:18 AM »
For Monson #3 and #4, im not sure its accurate to say "instead they were shipped to New York state for storage"..
They were found at a Rochester NY scrap yard..I dont think there was any "storage" intended.  :(

If Ellis D. Atwood  hadnt learned they were there and resuced them, im quite certain they would have been scrapped..
Otherwise the history is correct..I just question the use of the word "storage"..

has anyone ever heard how they ended up in Rochester?
who bought them, moved them to western NY, and why?

thanks,
Scot

Ted Miles

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Re: Roster of Surviving Maine 2' Locomotives
« Reply #16 on: July 28, 2015, 06:41:58 PM »
Ed and all,
               The Boothbay Railroad Village shop is rebuilding the SD Warren #1 back to a steam locomotive putting the boiler back together and whatever else it needs to run again. It will be great to see them running a Maine locomotive rather than those German industrial locomotives.

Although the SD Warren plant was not a common carrier railroad it was a Maine Two- Footer as far as I see it!

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Ed Lecuyer

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Re: Roster of Surviving Maine 2' Locomotives
« Reply #17 on: July 28, 2015, 06:51:43 PM »
My understanding is that the restoration of SD Warren #2 to operation by Boothbay Railway Village has been suspended. I'd love to have updated information on the matter.
« Last Edit: July 28, 2015, 09:13:26 PM by Ed Lecuyer »
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Philip Marshall

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Re: Roster of Surviving Maine 2' Locomotives
« Reply #18 on: July 28, 2015, 09:06:44 PM »
Their website suggests (not surprisingly) that it's a funding issue. They're >$100,000 short, and are accepting donations to continue the project.  See http://railwayvillage.org/explore/maine-railroad-history/baldwin-locomotive-restoration/

Also, it's S.D. Warren number 2, not number 1. Number 1 remains on display with WW&F boxcar 312, SR&RL boxcars 137 and 142, and SR&RL combine 11.

Ted Miles

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Re: Roster of Surviving Maine 2' Locomotives
« Reply #19 on: August 20, 2015, 12:26:25 AM »
Folks,
         The reason that they were in Rochester is that the scrap company was Rochester Iron and Metals. I assume that they bought the rest of the Monson Railroad when it quit operating in 1941 (?)

 In 1946 L.W. Moody did not recall where he heard that the two locomotives still existed; but we can be glad that a little bird told him and Mr Atwood had his check book handy!

Ted Miles

Philip Marshall

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Re: Roster of Surviving Maine 2' Locomotives
« Reply #20 on: August 20, 2015, 01:50:02 AM »
Whether the Monson engines' sojourn in upstate New York counts as "storage" or not is a matter of semantics, but I would tend to agree with Ed's use of the term. Yes, the engines were on the premises of Rochester Iron & Metal, which was a scrap dealer, but the very fact that they weren't cut up on the spot in Monson Junction but were instead loaded on flatcars (there are a couple of great photos of this in Two Feet to the Quarries ) and shipped several hundred miles west to Rochester suggests that Rochester Iron & Metal thought they had resale value beyond just scrap -- which was correct. The engines were stored there for the duration of the War (which is pretty amazing if you think about it) and then for a couple more years, until they finally found a buyer -- Ellis Atwood.

I'm reminded of a poignant little news item on the closure of the Monson RR that appeared in the January 1944 issue of Railroad Magazine. The author (I don't remember the name, but it wasn't Moody) laments that "the Monson has followed the Bridgton and Sandy River lines into oblivion", that "no more is there a common carrier of this gauge in the country," and that "it seems unlikely that the little Vulcan tank job will escape the scrapper's torch", or something to that effect. He does note at the end, however, that a certain Massachusetts man by the name of Atwood has purchased some of the equipment of the Bridgton & Harrison, "but the War has interfered with his plans".
« Last Edit: October 06, 2015, 11:21:59 PM by Philip Marshall »