Author Topic: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread  (Read 197512 times)

Keith Taylor

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #45 on: May 20, 2009, 08:54:15 PM »
Ron, it would be nice if the ASME would re-institute the "L" stamp. Putting a "Stationary" stamp on a locomotive just seems wrong.
As to riveting and threading....when you are a museum you are supposed to preserve the technology of the past, not just the outward appearance. Now if they were building a steam boiler for a non-museum railroad, then welding would be the way to go.
Keith

Gordon Cook

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #46 on: May 21, 2009, 02:33:48 PM »
Please add my name to the lengthening list of those who have been impressed and encouraged by the 'can do' attitude of the crew at Boothbay. There were many hurdles to leap, and none proved to be too high, not even the pile of paperwork!!
The display of artistry, imagination, knowledge, and energy that was required to build a locomotive boiler from scratch without too much help from modern technology shows a true dedication to and understanding of history. Channeling those 19th century engineers and craftsmen isn't easy.
A big thank you to Boothbay Railway Museum; Brian, Jason, Ron, those who I don't know, and also for the foresight of Boothbay's management for taking a risk.
Gawdon

Paul Horky

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #47 on: May 22, 2009, 07:50:55 PM »
 Just courious what is the complete final cost going to be?

James Patten

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #48 on: May 23, 2009, 12:17:01 AM »
The quoted price of the boiler was $60,000, divided in 3 equal payments (beginning, middle of the project, and end). 

John Kokas

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #49 on: May 24, 2009, 09:47:22 AM »
To all the "Gang" who worked on #9's boiler, a hearty Well Done !!!!!!! 
As one who has done this work in the past, it is a tough, dirty, frustrating, not to mention knuckle-busting job that many would give up on after only a couple of days.  OUTSTANDING  8)

Nyle Buxton

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #50 on: May 26, 2009, 03:31:28 AM »
Congrats on a job well done !!!!  But that was just the practice round for the future #11 and maybe even a #12 (#6) in the far off future.   ;)
  For those of us who have not experienced or performed a hydro test, what is the proceedure? What pressure is the boiler brought to?  and what kind of paper trail is involved along the way in the building and then test of the boiler?

Ron Ginger

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #51 on: May 27, 2009, 01:58:07 AM »
The hydro test is fairly simple.

Every external valve is attached and closed. Each of these valves is considered part of the boiler and must meet spec and be part of the test. The boiler is totally filled with water- no air space at all.  Nothing is connected beyond any valve except a water pump to supply the test pressure.  It is then pumped up to a pressure of 150% of working pressure- in this case 210 psi. It is held there while the inspector looks around for any leaks. He went over it pretty thoroughly, even crawling under it to get inside the firebox. After a few minutes at the high pressure it is lowered to working pressure- 140psi- and held there as long as the inspector wants, about an hour.

The boiler is required to be warm, as I recall over 70 degrees, We had a kerosene heater blowing into the firebox door for a couple hours to get the whole thing up to a suitable temperature.

The paper trail is extremely complete. Every piece of material that went into the boiler must have orders and invoices showing its exact origin, and each piece must have a certificate that it meets whatever spec is appropriate. Each piece of metal that came into the shop was logged in, and assigned a 2 character code. Each piece was stamped with the code. As a piece was cut off the stock to use it was first stamped with the same code, then cut off and used.

If you look at the boiler now you will see lots of yellow paint marker circles about 1" dia. These identify the code stamp. You can go back to a file and find the exact source of that item, and its certificate that it meets spec. Once the boiler has been approved and stamped these numbers are no longer important- the boiler now has a serial number and an S stamp that certifies all its pieces met spec.

Basically the inspector had to be satisfied that every item in the boiler was made from an approved material, with a clear spec. He actually did this review at several stages during construction, and initialed every order, spec sheet, and drawing.

He also looked at every test report, like the Xrays of welds and the stress relieving to verify the tests were done, and signed.

In addition BRV had to develop a written procedure for every operation. These procedures were part of the early work to get the certification. The inspector was frequently checking to see that these procedures were correct, and were performed correctly. It cost BRV over $30k to achieve this certification, including purchase of a set of spec documents that fill a shelf about 4 feet long. These get updated every 3 years, and more inspections, to the tune of over $10k.

Code work is a very detailed, and costly process. But in the end we have great assurance that every item in that boiler met all the specs needed to insure its safety.

« Last Edit: May 27, 2009, 02:08:41 AM by Ron Ginger »

Nyle Buxton

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #52 on: May 27, 2009, 03:16:19 AM »
Ron,
 
 Thankyou for the info on the hydro test and paperwork, very informative. Does BRV have the capabilities in house to do the weld X-raying and stress relieving or was that equipment brought in for the job on a as-needed basis?

Ron Ginger

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #53 on: May 27, 2009, 02:09:20 PM »
Xray was contracted to a company that comes on site with portable equipment.

The main stress relieving of the entire boiler shell and firebox was done in Pennsylvania. Brian and Jason drove it down and waited for it to be done- an overnight process. There is no furnace big enough any closer.

For a small area of work, like in a repair we have ceramic electric heaters that can be placed on the surface. We have temperature monitoring equipment and a laptop program that collects the data and controls the rate of heat and cool.

John A. Craft

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #54 on: June 03, 2009, 11:27:25 AM »
About 3:00 today the inspection was complete and the new boiler for #9 received its 'S' stamp.



Those that can, do.

Everybody else just sits around and talks.

Congratulations!

James Patten

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #55 on: June 13, 2009, 09:41:47 PM »
The new boiler was delivered this afternoon.  It's now sitting in Bay 1 on the concrete floor.  Additionally, the large casting that will connect the front and rear frames has finally made it up on the milling machine, where little chips are being cut off the ol' block.

Stephen Hussar

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #56 on: June 14, 2009, 12:08:24 PM »
Moving the boiler out of the BRV shop...






True story. As we crossed over the tracks and passed by Red's Eats in downtown Wiscasset, through my open window I heard a man say to his son, "hey, that was a boiler for a steam locomotive..."











« Last Edit: June 14, 2009, 02:32:18 PM by Stephen Hussar »

Paul Horky

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #57 on: June 14, 2009, 12:56:16 PM »
  To all Involved 
Nice job on building and gettind the new boiler to Sheepscot. Now with the boiler on hand I guess it's get hot time on the running gear. Will the old smokebox be atteched before or after the boiler is set on the running gear?
                                                                                                                                     

Bill Sample

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #58 on: June 16, 2009, 02:05:39 AM »
Great photographs!  The one of the boiler passing Red's Eats brings to mind the story I heard of # 9 departing Wiscasset for Connecticut many years ago - I heard the loco was loaded on a standard gauge flatcar near the current location of Red's - can anyone verify that?

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: WW&F No. 9 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #59 on: June 16, 2009, 01:36:08 PM »
Bill,  Engine 9 was loaded on a flatcar on the Wiscasset Grain Company siding.  The structure, which appears in the photos of engine 9 being loaded was near the present location of Red's Eats. 

Thanks for the photos Stephen.  The new boiler arriving at Sheepscot ... what a great day!  I see the boiler even has the gauge brackets on top of the firebox like the original.  It sure is beautiful.