Author Topic: New York 2' Operation  (Read 3587 times)

Ira Schreiber

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New York 2' Operation
« on: December 06, 2011, 08:39:50 PM »
Two footer at this site near Rome, NY, last year.  The 1910 Davenport worked in Wisconsin and Idaho before acquisition by William Willock for his estate railroad about 1951.  It was later kept at Frontier Town at N. Hudson, NY, but I'm not sure if it ever operated there.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UrEfklW_JeE


Richard "Steam" Symmes

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Re: New York 2' Operation
« Reply #1 on: December 06, 2011, 10:05:18 PM »
Willock's layout in Long Island was described in the book, "Little Railways of the World" by Frederick Shaw (Howell-North 1958).  His railroad was called the Indian Valley Line.  One of the engine operated at Frontier Town (see their website).

Years ago this operation in Rome, NY had what looked like a homemade 2-8-0 or 2-8-2. Don't know anything else about that.

This was interesting to see.

Richard Symmes

Glenn Christensen

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Re: New York 2' Operation
« Reply #2 on: December 09, 2011, 04:41:31 AM »
Hi Richard,

The 1976 edition of the "Steam Passenger Service Directory" contains a listing and photo for the "24" gauge, Rome & Fort Bull R.R." at Erie Canal Village in New York State.

The listing shows "Locomotives: #1, 2-6-2, Nolan Machine Works (1973), built for the Rome & Fort Bull R.R."  The loco has a tender, a high-mounted boiler, and piston valve cylinders making it look more like a scaled-down standard gauge loco than a narrow gauge one.  The drivers look to be about 24" in diameter and the pilot and trailing wheels are quite small (maybe 12").  I understand from some of the "Old Edaville" cognoscenti that the loco's service life was short due to some serious design short-comings.


Best Regards,
Glenn

Bernie Perch

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Re: New York 2' Operation
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2011, 03:32:52 PM »
Could anyone indicate what the "shortcomings" of this locomotive were?  I had a cab ride in her 30+ years ago when she was new and at that time it seemed to be running OK.  I guess it takes a while for these things to show up.

Bernie

Glenn Christensen

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Re: New York 2' Operation
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2011, 05:08:57 PM »
Hi Bernie,

Sorry, I do not have any specifics.  My assumption has always been that #1 was the first and only steam locomotive produced by Nolan.  (First and only that *I* know of anyway.)  As is often the case in similar situations, unexpected design weakness can manifest themselves over time.  Sometimes these difficulties can prove prohibitively expensive to repair.

I will leave the opportunity for further explanation to someone morefamiliar with the matter than i am.


Best Regards,
Glenn

PS - I understand Railstar (who I believe has the RR concession at ECV) owns  Byron Hiatt's old #2968.  This loco is one of two tender locomotives based upon the chassis of WW1 War Department, Davenport 2-6-2Ts.  This is the same locomotive mentioned under the WW! topic.

Brett Goertemoeller

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Re: New York 2' Operation
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2011, 05:32:03 PM »
#2968 came out of the Davenpot Factory as US Army #5245 (Davenport #1700) and was deliverd finished (not just a chasis as home have believed) to the Army in May 1919.  After it's army use it shows at Columbus Ohio suprplus depot in march of 1921....and from there to Byron Hiatt of Martensdale Iowa.  It was highly modified by Byron, to include modifying the chassis and frame to accept a boiler with a biger firebox.  From Byron it is listed as being sold (or transfered who knows with these army records) to the private railroad of George Long in Monroe, Washington.  From there....who knows...but we have discussed that is currently in the possetion of Railstar?  No one seems to know for sure.  
  The other "Byron" locomotive #2967 was also a Davenport, US Army #5240 (Davenport #1695) was also delivered finished in May 1919.  Same line of transfer as #2968.  As of 1990 shows as being Chassis only, but there again.....who knows. 

Brett
« Last Edit: December 09, 2011, 05:41:13 PM by Brett Goertemoeller »
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JoAnne Kennedy

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Re: New York 2' Operation
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2014, 04:01:15 AM »
Could anyone indicate what the "shortcomings" of this locomotive were?  I had a cab ride in her 30+ years ago when she was new and at that time it seemed to be running OK.  I guess it takes a while for these things to show up.

Bernie

I was going by last week and since it was unusually warm I stopped in and found a couple guys working on a diesel.  I didn't want to interfere with what was going on so I bought lunch and discussed the Rome &Ft Bull 2-6-2 at Pizza Hut.  
I got the following information:
The Rome & Ft Bull locomotive was built by Ed Nolan as an 0-6-0 and completed in 1973.  It was his 3rd, largest and last locomotive.  The previous locomotives were 12 and 16" gauge.  The only part reused on the Rome & Ft Bull locomotive was the smokestack.
The boiler was built by Cyclotherm and was too large and too heavy for the running gear.  Too much of the weight was far back making the locomotive very light on the front end and prone to derailment.  Lead and trailing trucks were added in an attempt to correct the problems.  But the lacked dentering devices and were not equalized with the drivers.  The valve gear was too light and prone to bending and slipping.  The biggest problem came with the lubrication system. Someone used old crankcase oil in the lubricator, the left valve siezed and bent the eccentric rod and spun the eccentric crank on the axle.  After that the machine was towed in and set out on a side track near the station.  Eventually the locomotive was removed and although it is still in existance it is no longer on the property.  
« Last Edit: January 19, 2014, 04:07:41 AM by JoAnne Kennedy »