Author Topic: 60# rail located in Mass.  (Read 6705 times)

Ira Schreiber

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Re: 60# rail located in Mass.
« Reply #15 on: December 03, 2008, 02:38:59 AM »
The weight of the rail in the crossing is to make a more stable base. By welding two lengths, you eliminate any joints in the crossing, cutting down on maintenance.

About 17 years ago, I installed an Omni crossing on a 2' railroad where we built an entirely new crossing. It was about 160' long crossing. The base was concrete with studs and clips to secure the rail. Then the Omni  rubber inserts were installed.
 
The requirement by the design engineers for the crossing was to support the weight of very large firetrucks. The rail used was new 12#. The trick was the reinforced concrete track base.

The crossing is still in use and shows no significant wear.

Allan Fisher

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Re: 60# rail located in Mass.
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2008, 02:45:21 AM »
I am afraid I disagree with the need to get end-battered 85 lb rail for any reason. Trading $100 a ton end-battered & therefore scrap 85 lb for $1000 a ton 60 pound is not worth the volunteer effort and the $500 to get it trucked to Maine.

Now - any 60 lb rail that is not end-battered, and the joint bars (and compromise bars) are very worth the effort.

State of Maine specs for grade crossings are a phone call away, and if by some chance they require 85 lb rail , this weight of rail is still a dime a dozen in New England as it was the standard weight of NH Branch Lines for years.
Allan Fisher

Vincent "Lightning" LeRow

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Re: 60# rail located in Mass.
« Reply #17 on: December 03, 2008, 02:55:49 AM »
The 85# on the siding is end battered, but the 85# remaining on the maineline is not. No mater what we salvage, we wll have to pay $500 for the truck; whether it's 400ft of 60# rail or 20 tonnes of whatever.  I am simply saying 'get the most bang for the buck'.  A half empty truck is partially wasted money. And $100 a ton recived is 4 times the $25 a ton spent to truck it to Maine.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2008, 03:01:30 AM by Vincent LeRow »
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