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Author Topic: TCDA No. 65 (Reefer) - Official Work Thread  (Read 71875 times)
Stephen Hussar
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« on: November 05, 2011, 08:12:00 PM »







« Last Edit: December 18, 2012, 08:08:36 PM by Ed Lecuyer » Logged
Duncan Mackiewicz
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« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2011, 03:32:40 PM »

Hmmm. That looks like some mighty fine hand-joinery being produced there. And it seems to be fitting together well too. Nice job!
Duncan
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Matthew Gustafson
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« Reply #2 on: December 17, 2011, 09:01:12 PM »

Is the the reconstruction of the WW&F Reefer Car that will look like the WW&F Boxcar 309 but in its Historic Colors
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John McNamara
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« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2011, 09:08:00 PM »

Matthew,

It will be a reproduction of WW&F 65, a refrigerator car that was labelled (and used for) the Turner Centre Dairying Association creamery located in downtown Wiscasset. It will be displayed at or near where the creamery was located.

-John
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Matthew Gustafson
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« Reply #4 on: December 17, 2011, 09:25:05 PM »

So what you are saying is that when its complete it wont be staying on the WW&F grounds when its finished
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« Reply #5 on: December 17, 2011, 09:34:34 PM »

I think it will spend summers in Wiscasset, and then possibly come back to Sheepscot in the winter.
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Jock Ellis
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« Reply #6 on: December 27, 2011, 10:12:00 PM »

My father did that kind of woodwork but I'm afraid I know next to nothing about it. Is it called mortise and tenon? How did they connect the ribs and the sides when they were in place. They sure are smiling a lot to be doing all that hard work.
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Jock Ellis
Stewart "Start" Rhine
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« Reply #7 on: December 28, 2011, 08:40:15 AM »

Hi Jock,

    The method is called mortise and tenon.  There are two basic types of joinery in wood car construction mortise and tenon and the use of corner irons.  In some cases both are used.  The key to the cars stability is the steel rods that travel through the car body.  Truss rods keep the base frame (end sills and stringers) true.  The cross rods help put weight on the bolsters.  Through rods will be installed next to each stud, these keep the car sides well seated to the frame and plumb.  Top rods will be used as well.  They keep the roof rafters solid to the top sills and give extra support for the roof structure.  When tightened, the top and side rods draw the wooden members into the sills.  After the frame is built, sheathing the car inside and out ties everything together. 

Stewart

     
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Jock Ellis
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« Reply #8 on: December 29, 2011, 04:41:53 PM »

Thanks, Stewart. I've always wondered how you kept them together laterally. I knew drilling and tapping into wood is less than adequate but I never considered rods next to each stud. Back in the day (as they say) did the RR personnel charged with the maintenance  of such cars tighten the nuts on a regular basis or when cars began to have a noticeable sag? What does the WW&F do (WWWW&FD?)?
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Mike Fox
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« Reply #9 on: December 29, 2011, 06:28:17 PM »

Some of the rods inside the car can't be tightened after the sheathing is applied. The wood will shrink a little, but not enough to allow the mortise and tennons to separate, while the rods hold everything together.
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Mike
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Stewart "Start" Rhine
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« Reply #10 on: December 29, 2011, 09:11:08 PM »

We are working from original Portland Company plans which show all the rods to be installed as construction progresses.  There is a lot of unseen steel in wooden cars.  As to rod adjustments, (as Mike noted) hidden rods are all tightened when they are installed and the nuts peened over.  No further attention is given them unless there are heavy repairs to the car sides.

A car in regular service would need the truss rods drawn after a time.  Cars, especially flats could have a noticeable sag.  The cross rods may need a bit of inward adjustment but not as much as the truss rods and not as often.  The shop crew would normally make adjustments and repairs to cars that have been bad ordered.  The important thing with truss rods is to wind them in evenly so each rod has the same tension.  This keeps the frame from racking as the car travels over switches and uneven track.  It's hard to say how often the truss rods would need adjustment, it depends on the type of car and what it carries.  My guess would be once a year for cars used on a weekly basis.

Stewart
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Mike Fox
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« Reply #11 on: January 01, 2012, 07:40:40 PM »

Here are a few pictures I took yesterday. Detail of the Mortise and tennons for the walls.









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Mike
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Robert Hale
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« Reply #12 on: January 02, 2012, 08:31:23 AM »

We are working from original Portland Company plans which show all the rods to be installed as construction progresses.  There is a lot of unseen steel in wooden cars.  As to rod adjustments, (as Mike noted) hidden rods are all tightened when they are installed and the nuts peened over.  No further attention is given them unless there are heavy repairs to the car sides.

A car in regular service would need the truss rods drawn after a time.  Cars, especially flats could have a noticeable sag.  The cross rods may need a bit of inward adjustment but not as much as the truss rods and not as often.  The shop crew would normally make adjustments and repairs to cars that have been bad ordered.  The important thing with truss rods is to wind them in evenly so each rod has the same tension.  This keeps the frame from racking as the car travels over switches and uneven track.  It's hard to say how often the truss rods would need adjustment, it depends on the type of car and what it carries.  My guess would be once a year for cars used on a weekly basis.

Stewart

Stewart,
What do you mean by "peening" the hardware to lock it (hex nuts or square)? I know I deal with all sorts of locking hardware when I work on airplanes but I'm not sure about this method.
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Stewart "Start" Rhine
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« Reply #13 on: January 02, 2012, 09:12:19 AM »

Hi Robert,

     Once the rod is in place and the nuts drawn in, the threads on the end of the rod are hammered over the top of the hex nut so the nut can not back out.  This is the method used when the Portland Company built the cars in the 1890's into the early 1900's.

Stewart
« Last Edit: January 02, 2012, 09:20:33 AM by Stewart Rhine » Logged
Robert Hale
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« Reply #14 on: January 02, 2012, 12:05:20 PM »

I think I know what you mean Stewart, but a pic would be great of you have one.
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