Author Topic: Log Possibilities  (Read 8311 times)

Ken Fleming

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Log Possibilities
« on: January 02, 2011, 04:59:37 PM »
Maybe its time to save any marketable logs for loading on our flat cars and hauled to Alna Center or Sheepscot.  Great for "log train' photo ops.  The logs could be either sold or sent to mill to have them cut in heavy timbers or boards for our future use.  Or, maybe used at the washouts.

Mike Fox

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Log Possibilities
« Reply #1 on: January 02, 2011, 08:14:43 PM »
The logs we have been leaving are too large to load onto the flatcar by hand. Any logs we had in the past from the parking are that were good have been taken already. the rest are too crooked to do anything with.
Mike
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Vincent "Lightning" LeRow

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Log Possibilities
« Reply #2 on: January 03, 2011, 12:18:00 AM »
Firewood!!
A spike saved is a spike earned.

Ken Fleming

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Log Possibilities
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2011, 09:10:53 AM »
Load the logs the way they did in 1905.  Use cant hooks (peavies second choice), a pair of skidding tongs and a couple of small (pecker pole) trees cut to length for ramp poles.  Skid the logs to loading area and roll the logs up ramp poles on to the flat car.  If logs are placed on a bank near or above the flat car height, gravity will make it easier to load.  To unload let gravity roll them back down the ramp poles.  This is not unlike the way we load/unload rail.  A couple of pieces light, scrap rail, cut to length and notched (thru head and web of rail) to fit in the stake pockets would also work for loading logs and rails.  We may need to do this in the future as we go North to Rt. 218.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2011, 09:13:20 AM by Ken Fleming »

Stephen Hussar

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Log Possibilities
« Reply #4 on: January 03, 2011, 11:08:58 AM »
It's a great idea, the photographic possibilities are immense. But it comes down to time and manpower. Now if we had ready use of a boom truck that would be a different story...

Stephen

Wayne Laepple

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Re: Log Possibilities
« Reply #5 on: January 03, 2011, 11:45:16 AM »
On this very subject, check out the YouTube posting by John Kokas further down on this page. You will see guys loading logs by rolling them across other timbers onto log bunks. I noticed they did not use Peavies or cant hooks; rather, they were using some sort of slightly hooked tool to control the logs. I suspect the Winters logging outfit on the WW&F loaded logs in a similar manner. I've never heard anything about them using a log loader or stiff leg derrick. In Australia, some logging operations used a team of oxen and a cable to drag huge eucalyptus logs up a pair of ramp logs.   

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: Log Possibilities
« Reply #6 on: January 03, 2011, 08:43:09 PM »
I think this would make for a great winter event- thought this for awhile.  Especially if we get a line-side sawmill set up.  And when you're done- sell the boards!  We can even involve a winter horse team. 

Maybe it's worth not waiting for a sawmill...  We've got the logs, the trains, and offers from local teamsters (terminology?)

Jason

Dana Deering

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Re: Log Possibilities
« Reply #7 on: January 04, 2011, 07:22:40 AM »
Back in the days before boom trucks most loggers would build what they called a "brow" for loading logs.  The brow was a kind of cribwork, usually built into a banking, that was raised so that is was level or just slightly higher than the bed of the truck or flatcar or trailer that was to be loaded with logs.  The logs were hauled to the brow and rolled onto the truck from the brow.  I have a picture of my grandfather standing on the brow taking a break from loading logs and i can remember seeing him loading logs onto a truck from the brow when I was a kid.  It was right beside the road protruding out of the banking.  Another way is to connect two long chains to the side of the flatcar and run the other ends under and around the log and then and over the car to the opposite side where they are hooked to a team of horses or tractor. when the horses move ahead the chains roll the log up the skids onto the car.  Unhook, back up, set the chains on the ground, roll the next log onto the chains, repeat.  I've seen that done using a logging sled to load logs in the woods.

Bruce Mowbray

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Re: Log Possibilities
« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2011, 07:40:48 AM »
 A pair of "disconnects" might be a good idea. They have a low load height and a fully adjustable ta handle any log length. Be careful with loading logs. They can get away from the handler and make a mess of whatever/whoever might get in the way. A flat car mounted grapple with a single operator might be the safest method. A simple portable hydraulic pump could be the power source. This would be handy for doing other remote work as well.

Bruce
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Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: Log Possibilities
« Reply #9 on: January 04, 2011, 10:18:45 AM »
The log train could be a nice Winter event.  What we do depends on what scenes we offer the visitors.  The log train would be the main draw.  If loading the logs on flatcars is part of the event older methods can be used.  If not, Mr. Verney can load the cars a few days before. 

The saw mill operation would be nice although it's probably a few years down the track.  We could build a new stub siding at AC and it would run down to a rig set up in the woods south of the stone piles.  I have a 3 horse Fairbanks flywheel engine that could power the mill until we get a boiler to run the steam engine.   Working sawmills are a favorite at the steam shows I have attended.  Proper set up, crew training and keeping the public safe are the biggest things.   

Stephen Hussar

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Re: Log Possibilities
« Reply #10 on: January 04, 2011, 10:41:17 AM »
Alna Center would be a perfect place for a sawmill.

Dave Buczkowski

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Re: Log Possibilities
« Reply #11 on: January 04, 2011, 12:28:40 PM »
What happened to Sheepscot Mills? All we need is a siding. The saw is already set up.
KD

John Kokas

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Re: Log Possibilities
« Reply #12 on: January 04, 2011, 12:48:14 PM »
OR,

How about near TOM where the harvesting needs to take place.  If we have plans (blueprints) for the new buildings, I would suggest that we use the sawmill to cut our main timbers and save money on the construction cost.  I assume we will continue on the basis of Post & Beam construction.  Also, how about cutting our own ties (yes - creosote is issue), is there anyone nearby who could process them?
Moxie Bootlegger

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: Log Possibilities
« Reply #13 on: January 04, 2011, 01:21:31 PM »
The part of a sawmill at SM is on private property so agreements would have to be reached for its use and to build a siding on pvt property.  The museum owns enough property at AC for the mill and siding plus it is on Avrill Road and not a private driveway. 

James Patten

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Re: Log Possibilities
« Reply #14 on: January 04, 2011, 05:04:00 PM »
The owner of Sheepscot Mills, who was once going to use the sawmill to cut up lumber for his house, lost interest in the idea and never got the sawmill set up beyond what you see today.  So eventually we'll take the sawmill back and set it up at AC.