Author Topic: Another New Sharon Diary Surfaces  (Read 3434 times)

Glenn Byron

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Another New Sharon Diary Surfaces
« on: September 13, 2010, 02:56:27 PM »
WOW!  New Sharonites sure were adept at keeping a journal, and you can visit this one right on your computer. In case you are not familiar with The Maine Memory Network, you've missed a great site. This diary is from about 1855 to 1866-7 by an  interesting fellow who was very involved in his church, town and the nation. I couldn't leave it once I started.  Lots of insight here about life 150 years ago. Bet you didn't know that "cankers and rash" was a big killer of the young.  Be there as a small town guy takes a train trip when trains were just beginning. One single page finds a New Sharon resident starving to death in a Confederate prison, General Lee surrenders, and President Lincoln killed. http://www.mainememory.net/bin/Detail?ln=9240  
« Last Edit: September 14, 2010, 12:47:20 AM by Glenn Byron »

Glenn Byron

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Re: Another New Sharon Diary Surfaces
« Reply #1 on: September 14, 2010, 12:32:26 AM »
Those Hours can show you how we are facing the same issues today as 150 years ago.  On one page he was voting "up or down" on the Aroostook Railroad just as we recently had to accept taxpayer liability for keeping this thing going.  I wonder what Cankers & Rash or "Canker Rash" was killing kids in the 1850's would be called today.  I asked my RN partner and she had no idea.  Do you have any suggestions what this disease was? A visit to this site will keep you captivated. And yes, Mr. J.W.Smith from the other New Sharon diary is mentioned often.
« Last Edit: September 14, 2010, 12:45:40 AM by Glenn Byron »

Glenn Byron

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Re: Another New Sharon Diary Surfaces
« Reply #2 on: September 14, 2010, 02:36:19 PM »
CanĀ“ker rash`
 1. (Med.) A form of scarlet fever characterized by ulcerated or putrid sore throat.

Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by C. & G. Merriam Co.                                       Aren't these computers helpful?  Today we take antibiotics as an everyday item.  In the 1800's Scarlet Fever was a killer, especially of the young.