Author Topic: A few stories ...  (Read 216481 times)

James Patten

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #75 on: October 16, 2011, 12:08:30 AM »
One couple showed up for a trip and they were the only people to go out, so we took out the railcar.  They thought it was pretty special.  Not surprisingly they'd never ridden a railcar like it before.  "Most railroads will only take you out on a full-sized train." 

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #76 on: October 17, 2011, 02:44:08 PM »
Story #35   Alice's Party -

My father in law, Don Sanger has lived in CT all his life.  Around 1960 he started visiting Alice Ramsdell and locomotive 9 which was on her property.  He recently told me about one of his early visits.

"I went to see Alice and she showed me the locomotive.  After looking around a bit we walked back to the house and up onto the porch.  There was a nice B&M engine bell sitting there and I commented on it.   Alice said.  "Well, it's not supposed to be there.  It was swiped from the barn a couple of days ago by some Democrats for a rally, they brought it back last night.  I would not have loaned it to them, it's a Republican bell."   I decided not to say anything else about it."

« Last Edit: July 20, 2016, 12:31:57 PM by Stewart "Start" Rhine »

Wayne Laepple

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #77 on: October 23, 2011, 06:25:56 PM »
This past Thursday, I was at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania and the Strasburg Rail Road. While at the railroad, I spent a little time with Kelly Anderson and Rick Musser of the railroad's mechanical department. When I mentioned the WW&F, both commented on how much they have enjoyed visits to Sheepscot, how impressed they are with what we've accomplished, and the entire atmosphere that pervades this place. That's really very high praise for what we do from two of the top men in the professional side of steam railroading.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2011, 10:20:45 PM by Wayne Laepple »

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #78 on: October 30, 2011, 04:02:50 PM »
Story #37   Stack Talk -

The snow storm that came through last night reminded me of something Harry once told me.  The storm brought high winds with gusts over 50 mph.  This morning I rebuilt the fire in my wood stove and cracked the dampers about 1/4 of the way open as I usually do.  Checking on the fire a few minutes later showed that the wood had caught but there was very little heat from the stove or stack.  Opening the door again I realized that the down-draft from the wind was squelching the fire.  I had to open the dampers more than twice as far to heat things up and compensate for the loss of draft.  The stove is in the cellar so there's over 30 feet of chimney but the wind was driving cold air down.

The railroad connection.  Harry once asked me if I knew why the stacks on the WW&F's shop building were so tall.  I responded that I thought it was for draft.  He said that was correct but that the stacks had changed through the years to allow for the strong winds that come up the river.   He said that at first the shop's boiler stack was shorter but was extended due to draft problems.  Eventually, there were two tall metal stacks for the shop building.  The stacks were on the back (North) end of the shop which was built during the Carson Peck era.  The taller stack was connected to the boiler of old #5 which became the shop boiler.  That stack came up through the roof of the lean-too addition.  The second stack was for the 25 horsepower Kendall & Roberts engine that was in the shop itself so the stack came up through the main part of the roof.  Guide wires kept the stacks in place.  I have been down along the waterfront in strong winds and can see why the shop crews needed tall stacks on the engines so they would have a good draft.
 
« Last Edit: July 20, 2016, 12:35:44 PM by Stewart "Start" Rhine »

Stephen Hussar

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #79 on: October 30, 2011, 04:33:21 PM »
Fascinating stuff, Stewart! Thank you for that.

Stephen

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #80 on: November 13, 2011, 01:11:02 PM »
Story #38  Rookie driver?

Yesterday the railroad's Model A truck was used to move railroad ties over to the "free" pile by the Cross Road.  I started the truck and backed it out of Bay 3 then sat in front of the shop for a minute as the battery charged.  Fred came over and asked if he could drive.  I said "sure, hop in"   I slid over to the passenger side and Fred got in.  He looked everything over and said "this is like the Model A truck that I used to drive around the farm."   I asked him when that was and he said "well the last time I drove it was before I went into the service so it would have been 1956"  He then backed up and drove the truck over to where the flatcars were tied down at the end of the mainline.  I got out to direct him while backing.  Fred drove the truck like he had been in it yesterday.  When the truck was in place he shut the engine off but he didn't get out.  I walked over to see what he was doing.  He said "I don't know how to get out of here"  I showed him the door handle and said "gee Fred, don't you remember how to open the door?"  He laughed and said "our truck didn't have doors!"
« Last Edit: July 20, 2016, 12:37:49 PM by Stewart "Start" Rhine »

Bill Sample

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #81 on: November 18, 2011, 03:50:33 PM »
Rookie driver?

 He said "I don't know how to get out of here"  I showed him the door handle and said "gee Fred, don't you remember how to open the door?"  He laughed and said "our truck didn't have doors!"

Stewart
Must've been a bit chilly in that truck during the winter!

Wayne Laepple

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #82 on: November 18, 2011, 05:04:27 PM »
At the farm owned by my uncles, they had an AA truck that had no cab at all. There was a seat from a long-gone spring wagon on a flat platform. That was it. We used it for haying, and we'd stack bales all over it, just leaving a little space so somebody could drive. There would be bales on both sides of the driver, so he had to climb over the hood to get off the thing. It had no muffler or exhaust manifold, so it was one noisy truck! Solid tires, too.

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #83 on: November 18, 2011, 09:46:09 PM »
Wayne, 

     I wonder if your uncle's truck was a Model A (AA).  I've never seen solid rubber tires on a Model A truck because solid tires were discontinued long before the Model A came out in 1928.  Maybe it was a Model TT?  Of course your uncle may have put old wheels and tires on a "newer" truck.  Good story.  It's amazing the critters that roamed around farms ... and shortline railroads.  With the 1930 AA truck, the Brookville and the Model T railcar,  the WW&F is a perfect example.

Stewart 

Wayne Laepple

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #84 on: November 18, 2011, 10:11:48 PM »
It was definitely a Model AA. I used to drive it, though never with a load on it. I would have remembered the TT transmission, I'm sure. It had solid tires on both front and back wheels. The front ones were about 4 inches square, and the back ones were single tires about 6 or 8 inches wide and two inches thick. As I remember, the front wheels were solid rims, and the back ones were spoked with big heavy spokes. They didn't look like any wheels I saw on any other Model AA's.

Keith Taylor

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #85 on: November 18, 2011, 10:29:24 PM »
Hi Wayne and Stewart,
Putting solid tires on an AA is fairly common, especially the ones that have been cut down to make woods vehicles. I have also seen AA's where the tires have been filled with cement! No flats....but I suspect the ride was less than elegant.
Keith

Steve Smith

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #86 on: November 19, 2011, 05:16:45 PM »
Keith, can you tell us how the tires were filled with cement? I don't think they could pump it in through the valve. Maybe lay the wheel on its side, cut a hole in the casing and pour in the cement? I guess once the cement hardened, a hole in the casing wouldn't matter.

Keith Taylor

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #87 on: November 19, 2011, 06:15:23 PM »
Steve;
The ones I saw they just chopped a hole in the sidewall and poured it in. Once you fill them with cement they don't need to hold air anymore...
What they were looking for was the added weight.
Keith

Bill Fortier

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #88 on: November 20, 2011, 07:11:57 PM »
Recently, a Lull construction forklift was in the shop for service. In the cab was a label reminding that the tires be filled with calcium chloride. "Odd tire filling," I thought, "Must be for ballast." Sure enough, it was, but it has its drawbacks. Of course, someone has a solution. No sidewall holes needed.

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: A few stories ...
« Reply #89 on: November 20, 2011, 09:26:36 PM »
Who doesn't remember putting fire wood or cinder blocks in the back of an old 2 wheel drive pickup truck or rear wheel drive station wagon to get better traction in a snow storm.  Just like time zones and traffic signal colors, the idea of getting better vehicle weight on the driving wheels started on the railroads.

Stewart