Author Topic: heavy engine maintenance  (Read 7086 times)

Jock Ellis

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heavy engine maintenance
« on: June 11, 2010, 01:48:46 PM »
Did the WW&F do its own heavy maintenance on locomotives or was there ever any real heavy maintenance done? Do these small engines hold up better than wide gage loks because there are fewer stresses on them?
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James Patten

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Re: heavy engine maintenance
« Reply #1 on: June 11, 2010, 02:36:29 PM »
I think the stresses on narrow guage equipment is probably proportionally as great (maybe greater) than that on standard gauge equipment.

The WW&F did have a good-sized machine shop in Wiscasset.  One has to assume that they maintained them as well as they could, although by the 30s the engines were worn out.  That's why Frank Winter bought the Kennebec Central engines, because they were relatively in good shape.

Jock Ellis

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Re: heavy engine maintenance
« Reply #2 on: June 12, 2010, 12:25:29 AM »
How does the original machine shop compare with the museum's? On a personal note, the GE Energy machine shop I work in is now almost totally five-axis CNC but only a couple of years ago, it was a museum of worn out crap. The WW&F still had several years to run after some of this stuff was built.  But that was $40 million or so ago.
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Paul Horky

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Re: heavy engine maintenance
« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2010, 04:18:11 PM »
Seem to me that I read in Robert Jones Book that at least the *2 and*3 were sent over to the Bath Ship Yard sometime in the 20's for an overhaul and that at other times personal from Bath came to Wiscasset to do work much like Jason L. and his partner do today.

James Patten

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Re: heavy engine maintenance
« Reply #4 on: June 12, 2010, 05:48:15 PM »
I think our shop may be slightly better than theirs, but then again I don't really know what they had.   We have 4 lathes of various sizes, a drill press of impressive proportions, two milling machines, and two shapers.  The shapers have never been used while here to my knowledge.  We also have a small pit, and an overhead crane in one bay.

Joe Fox

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Re: heavy engine maintenance
« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2010, 06:28:22 AM »
Who knows what the future will hold for the museums shop/facilities.  :)

Pete "Cosmo" Barrington

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Re: heavy engine maintenance
« Reply #6 on: June 14, 2010, 12:43:55 AM »
Does "visiting" equipment such as the portable forges used for riveting count?
On a similar note, no doubt our track dept. has equipment far in advance of anything the original ever dreamed of!

Jock Ellis

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Re: heavy engine maintenance
« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2010, 12:08:28 AM »
Paul, could the WW&F run the engines to Bath or did they have to be trailered, either by road or by rail?
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Paul Horky

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Re: heavy engine maintenance
« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2010, 01:54:18 PM »
Jock The engines would have had to travel to Bath by flatcar on the Maine Central over the Rockland branch it is several miles west of Wiscasset to Bath. Check out on Google Earth. Can someone up in Maine tell me is the Bath Ship Yard still in Buesness. IT does show up on Google Earth.

James Patten

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Re: heavy engine maintenance
« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2010, 02:34:47 PM »
BIW (Bath Iron Works) is still alive and well.  I believe they are getting at least one, maybe all, of the DDG-1000 contracts (the new model of destroyer).

Paul Horky

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Re: heavy engine maintenance
« Reply #10 on: June 15, 2010, 06:03:44 PM »
Thanks James it;s good to hear that an old company is still in buesness doing what thay have done for more than 100 year build ships.