Author Topic: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread  (Read 200316 times)

Robert Hale

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Re: Locomotive #11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #45 on: January 14, 2009, 12:32:29 AM »
Are you going to use the traditional way of fitting the tires by a gas-fired ring to heat it up then install?
Rob



Mike Fox

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Re: Locomotive #11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #46 on: January 14, 2009, 02:19:59 AM »
Maybe. The tires have to get up to 400 degrees to expand enough to be installed on the wheel. Any hotter and I guess it starts to have adverse effects on the hardened steel. I am sure someone will film our adventures, perhaps even me.
Mike
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Mike the Choochoo Nix

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Re: Locomotive #11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #47 on: January 14, 2009, 02:25:52 AM »
You will press the wheels onto the axel before installing the tires won't you?  That is the right way, there were some posts on RYPN about that, the tire tightens the wheel onto the axel even tighter than the press fit.
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Matthew Gustafson

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Re: Locomotive #11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #48 on: January 14, 2009, 01:08:40 PM »
Are you going to use the traditional way of fitting the tires by a gas-fired ring to heat it up then install?

Why do they always set a fire the locomotive wheels in the shops?  ??? ??? ???
« Last Edit: January 14, 2009, 01:37:47 PM by Ed Lecuyer »
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Mike Fox

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Re: Locomotive #11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #49 on: January 14, 2009, 01:38:09 PM »
Matt, they are expanding the metal. This makes the inside diameter a little larger. The tire is installed on the wheel and when the tire cools down, it tightens onto the wheel.

Mike Choo choo, that is my understanding. Jason figures it will be easier to contol the wheel if there was an axle attached to it.
Mike
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Erik Z. Missal

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Re: Locomotive #11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #50 on: January 14, 2009, 11:17:03 PM »
Hi,
When I worked at a shipyard, we put the coupling end on one of the shaft sections. We had electric heaters that were shaped to fit the outside of the coupling. The shaft coupling was heated to around 450 degrees, if I remember correctly and then pressed on using large threaded bolts. We only had one chance to get it right. The electric heaters were easy to use and control the temperature so it didn't overheat. Maybe we could get a similar type of heater.

Erik

Jason M Lamontagne

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Re: Locomotive #11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #51 on: January 15, 2009, 12:53:35 AM »
Hello all,

We will be using a gas ring, fired with propane mixed with compressed air.  The ring has already been made by Vern Shaw and Jonathan St Mary.  We've been focusing heavy on the railcar lately- and hope to put tires on those wheels early next month.  I'll make an announcement here as I figure some might enjoy seeing this process.

Of course now we'll have 30 people there and something will go wrong.... sightons (spelling, John M.?)  Not much really can go wrong- usually only takes about 8 minutes to heat, then a couple seconds to drop on. 

Don't know when we'll do no 11's lead wheel- No 9 is so screaming for attention that No 11's first complete wheel probably ought to wait a bit.

see ya
Jason

see ya
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John McNamara

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Re: Locomotive #11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #52 on: January 15, 2009, 02:29:50 AM »
sightons (spelling, John M.?) 

from: http://tmrc.mit.edu/dictionary.html

Psiton
    elementary particle carrying the sinister force. These particles emerge from the eyes of spectators, and even remote and future viewers (therefore, the number of psitons out of a video camera can be huge!). Since psitons carry the sinister force, then:

    The probability of success of an action/demonstration is inversely proportional to the number of psitons falling on it.

-John

Gordon Cook

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Re: Locomotive #11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #53 on: January 15, 2009, 02:32:36 PM »
sightons (spelling, John M.?) 

from: http://tmrc.mit.edu/dictionary.html

Psiton
    elementary particle carrying the sinister force. These particles emerge from the eyes of spectators, and even remote and future viewers (therefore, the number of psitons out of a video camera can be huge!). Since psitons carry the sinister force, then:

    The probability of success of an action/demonstration is inversely proportional to the number of psitons falling on it.

-John
Hmmm, somewhere Murphy and Smoot are smiling...
 ::)
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Duncan Mackiewicz

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Re: Locomotive #11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #54 on: January 15, 2009, 09:43:01 PM »
Yup, Murphy said if something can go wrong, it will and at the worst possible time. I think that was his first and best known saying.
Duncan

Ted Miles

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Re: Locomotive #11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #55 on: January 31, 2009, 06:47:50 AM »
Jason and all,

I am looking at the appendix in the back of the Moody book and it says that:

WW&F 7 was built by Baldwin as their C/N 40864 in 9-1907. the total engine weight was 56,000 or 23 tons; heaviest locomotive to run on the WW&F. She was a 2-4-4RT locomotive.

I think the locomotive was burned in the engine house fire and sat out the last years of operation.   

You are announcing quite a project there! only a handful of steam locomotives have been built from scratch in the United States. The most famous are the two opeerating 4-4-0s at Promontary National Historic Site in Utah. Of course being standard gauge they are somewhat larger.

But the British proved that they can do a new locomotive for main line operation. The Toronado has just entered service. She is a standard gauge Pacific!

But if you build enough parts you will end up some day with a steam locomotive! More power to you!

When the #9 is in steam I will even send you a donation for the new locomotive project!

Ted Miles
« Last Edit: May 17, 2019, 10:21:30 PM by Ted Miles »

Eric Bolton

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Re: Locomotive #11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #56 on: February 01, 2009, 07:22:32 AM »
7 was not the largest. The 6 was which was a 2-6-2. Also the 7 was 28 tons and yes it along with the 6 were caught in the engine house fire at Wiscasset.
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Matthew Gustafson

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Re: Locomotive #11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #57 on: February 01, 2009, 03:57:44 PM »
Was #6 larger the SR&RL 2-6-2 #23 & #24?  ??? ::) :)
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Eric Bolton

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Re: Locomotive #11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #58 on: February 02, 2009, 05:19:59 AM »
It was for sure not bigger then the 23. 23 was the largest two foot gauge locomotive built for use in the USA. My guess is that the 24 may also be larger as well.
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Bruce Mowbray

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Re: Locomotive #11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #59 on: April 04, 2010, 03:08:18 PM »
I'm not sure if this is the proper place to post this, Feel free Mr Moderator to move it if necessary.

I have been making some parts for the #11 under the management of Jason. It was decided that since the axles for the #9 are servicable (I will let Jason give you the details) that the material for the #9 axles have been turned into some key parts for the #11. Here are some of the parts.

This is the axle for the lead truck It has been rough turned one end at a time. Next it will be turned between centers to get everything exactly concentric.
« Last Edit: December 18, 2012, 02:56:20 AM by Ed Lecuyer »
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