Author Topic: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread  (Read 202359 times)

Bernie Perch

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #210 on: January 29, 2013, 04:47:13 PM »
Duncan,

The drawing in the photo of my patterns was made by Rick Sisson and has compensated for shrinkage and machining.  All you have to do is follow the exact dimentions and you will have the perfect pattern.  If you start one and have any questions, just email me.  I don't know exactly what Rick is working on now, but his work make ours much easier.  Talk to Jason about what he wants next.  Actually the one in the photo would have been a perfect beginners project.

Bernie

Matthew Gustafson

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #211 on: January 29, 2013, 05:54:58 PM »
Has anyone thought of enlisting local high school wood shops to make patterns of the more "simple" parts?
I could had done that 2 years ago while I was still in high school because I my school did had a wood shop and I was in that class for 2 years and I could had easily done you guys a favor but that was two years ago and my Grandpa's wood shop does not have the correct tools to make parts you need.  :o :( :-\
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Duncan Mackiewicz

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #212 on: January 30, 2013, 07:20:29 PM »
Bernie,

I have time and tools. I will have to keep in touch about making a pattern.

Duncan

Ken Fleming

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #213 on: February 26, 2013, 11:08:44 PM »
Has anyone thought of using a 3D Printer to make patterns?  One advantage would be making a "model" of the pattern from a scaled down drawing to see it before going full size.  3D Printers are limited in size by their work area size, however patterns are typically made from a number of parts, so not a problem.  Once a drawing is converted to 3D it can be sectioned to fit.  3D Printers are falling in price and now start a low as $500.  They produce a product from ABS or PLA plastic and can be accurate to 100 microns.  The software is freeware (for the most part) and thus could be shared between a number of "draftsmen".  Also drawings can be saved on a memory card library for reuse or sharing.  The final drawings can be e-mailed for production at a single site.  Drawings would be something to do on cold, winter nights.

Surf YouTube to see the how's  and what's of 3D Printing.  Sample http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LRv4jp-hhBE
« Last Edit: February 26, 2013, 11:27:26 PM by Ken Fleming »

Stephen Hussar

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #214 on: February 27, 2013, 10:13:42 AM »
Yes, we've been talking about 3D printing for quite a while now.

Stephen

Hansel Gordon

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #215 on: February 28, 2013, 12:36:43 AM »
THAT'S AWESOME!!!! Then we can make #11 toys/models for the gift shop!!!!!!

John Kokas

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #216 on: February 28, 2013, 12:38:51 PM »
how about patterns for parts to make #11 (7), in HOn2, O and G scale and then sell them as "custom" units.
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Stephen Hussar

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #217 on: March 12, 2013, 12:44:22 PM »
All, more beautiful patterns for No 11 from Bernie Perch...this is the Outer Bolster pattern. Thank you, Bernie!

Stephen





Bernie Perch

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #218 on: March 12, 2013, 05:11:01 PM »
Stephen,

Again, thanx for posting this.  I have already started the next one which should be ready to bring up for the work weekend.  Alan just finished some and the pile of patterns for #11 is accumulating.  I am looking forward to seening parts on the erection floor.

Bernie

Stephen Hussar

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #219 on: March 12, 2013, 06:44:39 PM »
This image is from Alan Downey and shows patterns for the Pilot poling Bracket, Pillow Block Core Box, and Pillow Block. Thanks, Alan...nice work!


Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #220 on: March 12, 2013, 07:55:09 PM »
Wow - nice patterns by Bernie and Alan.  Youz guys do beautiful work!

Stewart

Mike Fox

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #221 on: March 12, 2013, 09:48:47 PM »
Nice work. I do have a question. What is the yellow for? Is it marking a location or are you making a pin for that?
Mike
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Alan Downey

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #222 on: March 12, 2013, 10:33:02 PM »
Thanks for putting the pictures up Stephen, and thank you all! I'm looking forward to bringing the patterns up to the museum this May, and getting the chance to meet and work with everyone.

Mike, the piece in the middle is a "core box". It's used to ram up the sand to form up two halves of a cylinder to create a core, which is used to create holes in the castings. I would imagine sometimes core boxes are a final dimension, but in this case, it's to aid the machinist in boring out a larger hole for the bearing in the pillow block. The painted yellow sections tell the foundry that there is to be a core placed in those locations once the halves of the mold are rammed up, and the patterns removed. The core box is painted yellow so that they know that it's a core box, and not something else. Bernie has made many more core boxes as well, including for the counterweights, he can also correct me if I've misstated anything, or not made sense!
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Stephen Piwowarski

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #223 on: March 13, 2013, 12:08:18 AM »
Gentleman,

Really beautiful work.  I remember a while back when I was reading Dave Gingery's series on building a machine shop from scrap, he mentioned using auto body filler to create a fillet on castings.  I see this on your pattern Bernie and was wondering what you use.

Take care,
Steve

Bernie Perch

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Re: WW&F No. 11 - Official Work Thread
« Reply #224 on: March 13, 2013, 02:44:48 AM »
Alan,

Your description of the coring process and how the foundry recognizes it is correct.

Stephen,

I use homemade wood quarter round for most of my fillets.  I used some plastic wood in some of the shallow and tight spots.  Chances are it wouldn't hold up if the pattern was being used continuously.  I should have also used wood in those areas.  I never thought of using auto body filler although I have used quite a bit of it when my brother had an auto body shop.  Alan uses a homemade mixture which I haven't been able to duplicate.

Also, the paper I promised to email to you about whistles during the last work weekend, I couldn't find it.

Mike,

If you wish to see more complicated cores, go to page 11 of this thread to see the one for the crank.  The axle and crank holes are marked for cores, but the core boxes are not in the photos.

Bernie