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1  Worldwide Narrow Gauges / Two Footers outside of the US / Re: South African narrow gauge 2-8-2 on: May 25, 2017, 08:22:27 PM
Yes, I believe both videos are from Sandstone Estate.

It's apparently quite an operation! See http://www.sandstone-estates.com/index.php/about-us-28

Here's a quote that says it all:
"Although we set out collecting Agricultural machinery we did not close our doors to any collector who wanted a safe haven for his beloved old bus or engine or piece of earth moving machinery. While the 2-ft Narrow Gauge railway is at the centre of our activities because it plays quite an important role in the ongoing transportation of items on the farm it should not be allowed to over shadow many of the other fascinating items of interest. Military vehicles, Agricultural Traction engines, buses, cars, ox wagons with oxen attached are all there. Finally, by way of clarification we are not a museum; we are simply a private collection of Heritage items on a commercial farm and the staff do their best to keep everything in tip-top condition and to show visitors around as appropriate."

I would love to get down there sometime.
2  Worldwide Narrow Gauges / Two Footers outside of the US / Re: South African narrow gauge 2-8-2 on: May 25, 2017, 07:04:20 AM
What a neat video! Thank you, Wayne.

Youtube's ever-perceptive algorithms suggested this other video to me after watching the above. I'd love to have one of these elegant little outside-frame 4-4-0s.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_u99VjboT-U
3  WW&F Railway Museum Discussion / Work and Events / Re: Flatcar 118 repairs on: May 15, 2017, 01:57:28 AM
If I'm not mistaken, the WW&F was the only Two-Footer that used bottom-operated couplers, so only the cars with original WW&F couplers (flatcar 118, boxcar 309, and the caboose) are bottom-operated.

(I assume the couplers on No. 9 are of SR&RL origin, and the couplers on coach 3 are from the B&SR via Edaville, which is why they're top-operated.)
4  WW&F Railway Museum Discussion / Work and Events / Re: Flat Car 1014 - Official Work Thread on: April 27, 2017, 02:30:54 AM
Really nice job, Mike!
5  The Original W&Q and WW&F: 1894-1933 / Original Railway / Re: Fred Fogg on: April 22, 2017, 04:03:32 AM
I'm fond of "Stephenson gauge" for 4' 8-1/2", but I'm afraid no one will know what I'm talking about so I never use it.  Alternatively, I have a friend from grad school who grew up behind the Iron Curtain in the former Czechoslovakia who refers to it as "Western gauge".
6  The Original W&Q and WW&F: 1894-1933 / Original Railway / Re: Fred Fogg on: April 21, 2017, 08:20:16 PM
Yes, that's right. Narrow-gauge steam was still less than 10 years old in 1872.
7  The Original W&Q and WW&F: 1894-1933 / Original Railway / Re: Fred Fogg on: April 21, 2017, 06:10:28 PM
Wow, very neat! 1872 is indeed super-early, especially for Maine given that the MEC had only just finished converting from 5'6" broad gauge to standard gauge the previous year. Who is the author of the booklet?
8  WW&F Railway Museum Discussion / Work and Events / Re: Coach 9 Official Work Thread on: April 19, 2017, 06:06:32 AM
I have found both Honduras and African Mahogany...Do we care which source.  The same sizes are not necessarily available in both sources.

I imagine the mahogany in coach 3 is West Indian or "Cuban" mahogany (Swietenia mahagoni), but that species is now so rare due to historical exploitation that it's unavailable as lumber. Honduras mahogany (Swietenia macrophylla) would be a good match, even if it's not exactly the same wood. I don't know if African mahogany (Khaya senegalensis) was even commercially available in the US in the 1890s, though it was already being exported to Europe by that time, apparently.
9  WW&F Railway Museum Discussion / Work and Events / Re: Coach 9 Official Work Thread on: April 18, 2017, 11:02:32 PM
It should be pretty simple to differentiate oak from mahogany. Oak is a ring-porous wood with really large and dramatic rays (which give quarter-sawn oak its character), whereas mahogany is a diffuse-porous wood with very fine rays -- somewhat resembling birch. (In fact, 19th-century furniture makers would sometimes stain birch to make it look like mahogany.) If possible, look for end grain on the inside of a joint where it's not covered by varnish.
10  Other Maine Narrow Gauges (Historic & Preserved) / Sandy River & Rangeley Lakes Railroad / Re: Surviting SR & RL Passenger cars on: April 17, 2017, 03:45:57 AM
Hi Ted,

Thanks for posting the list. I may be confused, but I thought SR&RL railbus 4 and coach 19 were at Maine NG, and coach 21 was at Boothbay. You may have more current information than I do though.
11  General Topics / General Discussion / Re: Building track in 1910 on: April 04, 2017, 05:43:00 PM
I think that's just an optical illusion. Standard gauge sometimes looks like broad gauge in old photos because of the small equipment and light rail, both smaller than we're used to seeing now. (Yes, I know the Grand Trunk was originally built to 5'6" broad gauge, but they had long since converted to standard gauge by 1910.)
12  General Topics / General Discussion / Re: Building track in 1910 on: April 04, 2017, 03:24:01 AM
And yet the ties are all so uneven, and with just two flat sides, they have to be hand-hewn!

Also, I can't see anyone at the front of the machine passing signals back to the engineer. How does he know when to start and stop?
13  The Original W&Q and WW&F: 1894-1933 / Original Railway / Re: FS&K Ry - A little teaser! on: March 30, 2017, 07:35:33 PM
As further evidence of how close it came to being built, I came across a railroad map published in 1901 that shows the FS&K.

Produced by the New England Railway Publishing Co. in Boston, a firm best known for their pocket-sized "Baby Pathfinder Railway Guide", the ABC Pathfinder Railway Guide Map shows the entire US railroad system on two big poster-sized sheets, each roughly 29 x 44 inches, one for the eastern US and one for the western US. It's apparently well known among collectors of old maps, but I hadn't heard of it until I saw a copy of the eastern US map listed for sale recently (and since sold) by an antiquarian map dealer in New York:

http://www.geographicus.com/P/AntiqueMap/EasternUnitedStates-railwaypublishing-1901

Zooming in on Maine, you can see there is a dotted line between Waterville and Farmington -- the FS&K! Wiscasset to Albion is labelled as the WW&F rather than the W&Q, but the Winslow branch is another dotted line, apparently still unfinished. The level of detail is amazing, with even tiny flag stops like Chelsea on the KCRR included. (See attachment.)
14  WW&F Railway Museum Discussion / Work and Events / Re: Equipment Car 1015 - Official Work Thread on: March 26, 2017, 11:56:17 PM
Great work, Mike!

I have a much better idea of what you're doing now. It kind of reminds me of a heavy-duty version of the 4-wheel railbus trailers on the SR&RL.
15  The Original W&Q and WW&F: 1894-1933 / Original Railway / Re: FS&K Ry - A little teaser! on: March 23, 2017, 12:45:41 AM
Yes, thank you Paul. This is such a fascinating topic.

While looking for the list of FS&K grade crossings in Farmington, I came across the Railroad Commissioners' decision on the FS&K-SRRR connection in Farmington in the Report for 1901, pages 129-147. (FYI: The same volume has a list of Waterville & Wiscasset RR grade crossings in the towns of Winslow, Vassalboro, and China on pages 149-152, and a petition to allow the condemnation of land for the Winslow station on pages 159-160.)

The Farmington decision is a fascinating read, and what amazes me is how close the Commissioners came to actually giving permission for the connection. Basically, they agreed with the FS&K that it had a legal right to connect with the SRRR in Farmington, but the plan the FS&K submitted seemed to be based on the misunderstanding that the south end of the Farmington yard was the legal terminus of the SRRR. However, if the FS&K could just find a way to reach the SRRR north of the Farmington yard, it was free to do so.

Incredibly, the Commissioners noted that if it had been the SRRR petitioning for a connection with the FS&K on the same alignment, and not the FS&K petitioning to connect with the SRRR, they would have actually approved it, because the SRRR was an existing tenant on MEC property! They also suggested a possible compromise arrangement (entirely voluntary) that would have involved the MEC erecting a new freight house south of and in line with the passenger station to open up a clear ROW down one side of the yard, but the MEC doesn't appear to have been interested in cooperating. It all came so close to happening!
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