W.W.&F. Discussion Forum

WW&F Railway Museum Discussion => Work and Events => Topic started by: Tom Werb on July 31, 2015, 07:43:00 PM

Title: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Tom Werb on July 31, 2015, 07:43:00 PM
I'm looking forward to #9's return to steam; hope to get up to Alna to see it.

Question:  Will #9 have working Vacuum Brakes??

If so, #9 may be the ONLY operational U.S. steam loco with working 19th-century Vacuum Brakes.

IIRC, only the SR&RL made a complete conversion to Automatic Air Brakes, but #6 did not
get the Air Brakes before going to the K.C. & W.W. & F.

Extremely-Narrow-Mindedly,
Tom Werb
Preston, CT.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Steve Smith on July 31, 2015, 09:19:56 PM
Yes, I believe it is intended that No. 9 have working vacuum brakes. If you go to Work and Events, then WW&F No. 9 – Official Work Thread, then Page 33 of that thread and scroll down, you’ll come to a picture of Eric Schade with No. 9’s bell that he’s just polished. In the background of that picture you’ll see vacuum brake components lying on No. 9’s deck.

Somebody correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe the black truncated cone is a new vacuum brake diaphragm that was cast using a wooden mold that Eric made.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jason M Lamontagne on July 31, 2015, 09:49:40 PM
No 9 will have working Eames straight vacuum brakes.  Eric Schade indeed made replacement diaphragms; we're extremely pleased with these reproductions as they are quite close to the original.  They are double layered no6 cotton duck canvas, sewn roughly to shape, coated with rtv silicon (with black pigment) and pressed between a male and female mold (Eric made the male, Ron Ginger the female).  The result is a very rugged rubberized canvas- identical except that Eames (subsequently NYAB) used natural rubber vulcanized at high temperature.  Upon bench testing the very stiff diaphragm began collapsing with less than 0.5psi differential- great!

Jason
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jason M Lamontagne on July 31, 2015, 09:53:30 PM
(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0826.jpg)

This is a repost of Brendan Barry's photo from the no 9 thread under work and events.  I think it's page 27 or 29 (I know it's an odd page anyway)
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on August 01, 2015, 02:23:12 AM
It's my understanding that Waynesburg & Washington No. 4 at the Greene County Historical Museum in Waynesburg, PA has working Eames vacuum brakes, so No. 9 will be one of two narrow gauge steam locomotives so equipped -- still pretty impressive!

Now if we can have an entire consist behind No. 9 with working Eames vacuum brakes, that will be really special!
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jason M Lamontagne on August 01, 2015, 07:30:42 AM
We are actively pursuing that end...

Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on August 01, 2015, 07:46:57 AM
Jason,

What rolling stock do we have that is vacuum brake equipped? (i should know this but can't remember) And secondly, what would be the plan to equip the cars which are not equipped presently?
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Steve Smith on August 01, 2015, 11:24:22 AM
Phillip, this YouTube video, I think made in 2012, gives a pretty good look at Waynesburg & Washington No. 4:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15P7k69-jYA

Vacuum brake pots show at 0:15, 2:30 and 2:40. The ones at 2:30 and 2:40 were obviously not in operating condition at the time. Don’t know what might have been done with them in the meantime
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on August 01, 2015, 06:01:32 PM
Thanks for the video, Steve! That gives a great overview of the engine. Perhaps I was misinformed but I've seen photos somewhere showing the pots on W&W No. 4 with repaired diaphragms in contraction. I don't remember who took them or when they were taken, however.

At the very least, No. 9 will be the only U.S. narrow gauge engine with Eames vacuum brakes in regular operation, which is an exciting prospect!
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Joe Fox on August 02, 2015, 06:17:36 AM
John, Coach 3 originally had vacuum brakes but the only thing left is the old air line. The plan is to install vacuum brakes on the passenger cars just like the original railroad.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John McNamara on August 02, 2015, 01:18:21 PM
I have some questions about vacuum brakes:

1. Are the couplings between cars somewhat similar to those used with air brakes?
2. Assuming that you arrive at TOM and want to do a run-around, does one close angle cocks on the engine and nearest car, disconnect the hoses, uncouple the cars, run-around, couple the cars, reconnect the hoses, open the angle cocks, and "pump down the air?"
3. How long do the steps in #2 above take?
4. Would all cars in the train have to be equipped with at least a pass-through pipe?
5. Would all motive power (such as #52) have to be equipped?
6. Will supplemental hand-operated mechanical brakes remain?

-John
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jason M Lamontagne on August 02, 2015, 03:04:05 PM
1.  Yes.
2.  Yes, plus a simple brake test proving that the last car on the train responds to a brake application and release.
3.  I suspect the time added to a runaround should be perhaps a minute or two once the crews are trained and used to the procedure.  No problem when Bob C is conducting...
4. The goal is that all cars have operable train brakes.
5.  Yes.  A critical part of the plan is that 52 have a vacuum system, for consistency amongst operations.  We have an active plan to allow this.  51, as a designated track car, would not.
6.  Yes, though they should become parking brakes.

There are several motivating factors:
A.  Safety during Operations down the mountain.
B.  Consistent and appropriate  brake applications.
C.  Promote the use of (cheap) car brake shoes rather than (expensive) loco brake shoes.  Plus, when braking effort is spread over every truck on the train, wear becomes minimal.
D.  Provide a more effective back up than safety chains (they would ultimately go away- once we've field tested the brake system for a couple years).

See ya
Jason
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on August 02, 2015, 05:18:03 PM
I hate to question you last statement about safety chains, but with vacuum brakes, there is no instant on for the brakes, correct? With air, the sudden drop in air pressure applies the brakes. Am I correct in saying the vacuum applies the brake? Or does the vacuum keep the brakes from applying?
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Craig "Red" Heun on August 02, 2015, 05:59:43 PM
http://www.railway-technical.com/vacuum.shtml

Mike found this on line

Seems like lack of vacuum operates it
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on August 02, 2015, 06:47:32 PM
That article describes the UK/European vacuum brake system, but with the Eames vacuum brake used in the US the vacuum applies the brake. Like straight air as opposed to Westinghouse air it's not an "automatic brake", so the brakes don't go on instantly if the train comes apart. However, the Eames brake is supposed to act really quickly and according to historical accounts it worked well on railroads with short trains (<10 cars) that made frequent stops, which is why it was favored on rapid transit systems like the New York Elevated RR.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike the Choochoo Nix on August 02, 2015, 06:58:49 PM
FYI,
Semi trucks used vacuum brakes for years, a friend of mine had an old GMC with them on the trailer. They used the same glad hands as air brakes. The vacuum cylinders were much larger and they were mounted the opposite of the way the air cylinders would be so they could pull not push. There was a storage tank on the tractor and on the trailer for emergency vacuum. The vacuum came from the engines intake manifold.
Mike Nix
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jason M Lamontagne on August 02, 2015, 07:30:02 PM
Ok, setting the record straight. 

Our system will be automatic.  Vacuum will keep the brakes off; a sudden loss of vacuum will result in the instantaneous full application of all train brakes, except the locomotive.  In short it is the vacuum equvalent to a standard Westinghouse style compressed air train brake.

The design is functionally equivalent to the UK system but was is, in fact, distinctly American.  I was hoping to unveil this discussion later- as there is a substantial back story both to the original design and to our picking this system and carrying it forward.  There are numerous reasons we are choosing this route.

I'd like to get 9 done and formally prepare this topic for debut.  It is not yet a board-sanctioned project; as such it's still hypothetical, though we are very excited by it.

See us
Jason
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on August 02, 2015, 08:04:43 PM
Thanks Jason. Sounds good to me.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on August 02, 2015, 08:44:12 PM
Thanks, Jason. I look forward to hearing more details about the system you're developing. It sounds like it will correct a lot of the problems associated with the original Eames design.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bill Reidy on August 02, 2015, 08:46:47 PM
Sounds like this will be the basis for one or (hopefully) a series of interesting articles in the newsletter.  I'm curious on the history of vacuum versus compressed (right term?  or pressurized?) air brakes.  Particularly in application on the Maine two-footers.

Also curious on the use of safety chains.  Am I correct in assuming safety chains were a more recent development and not used normally on the original Maine two-footers?
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on August 02, 2015, 10:12:46 PM
The Mid-Continent Railway Museum's website has a nice history of the Eames vacuum brake, which includes the violent death of its inventor: http://www.midcontinent.org/rollingstock/dictionary/eamesbrakes.htm (http://www.midcontinent.org/rollingstock/dictionary/eamesbrakes.htm)
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jason M Lamontagne on August 02, 2015, 10:15:45 PM
That was a great resource for us.  Our system is one which Fred Eames was developing at the time of his death.  We want to make him proud!

Jason
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John McNamara on August 02, 2015, 10:34:29 PM
Sounds like this will be the basis for one or (hopefully) a series of interesting articles in the newsletter.  

I hope so!
-John M
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Craig "Red" Heun on August 03, 2015, 06:39:53 PM
Thanks Jason et al
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Tom Werb on August 06, 2015, 08:33:06 AM
Yes, that is the European Automatic-Vacuum System.
I'm searching for a diagram and/or description of the US 1880s Straight Vacuum System.

As I understand it . .

Each Car and the Locomotive had a Vacuum Brake Diaphragm or Cylinder.
They were all connected to a Vacuum Line that ran the length of the train.
The Loco had an Eductor (like a Venturi) to generate the Vacuum.
Blowing steam from the Boiler thru the Eductor created a Vacuum in the Train Vacuum Line and applied the Brakes.
Releasing the Vacuum, bu admitting air into the Vacuum Line, released the Brakes.

What I don't know is whether there was a Check Valve in the Vacuum Line after the Eductor?
If the engineer applied vacuum to the Train Line via the Eductor, was it "locked-in" by a Check Valve?
Or did the Train Line Vacuum go back to ZERO when the steam flow thru the Eductor was stopped?

We DO know that the exhaust steam from the Eductor was released to the atmosphere by one of three methods:
#1  It was dumped to atmosphere via an open-ended pipe; this was VERY NOISY when the brakes were applied.
#2  It was dumped to the Smokebox and up the Stack; this quieted the released steam.
#3  It was dumped via a Muffler; this typically protruded above the Cab Roof.

So, I think we really need TWO Brake Valves:
(1)  One to admit steam to the Eductor, generate the Vacuum in the Train Brake Pipe, and apply the Brakes,
and, assuming there is a Check Valve to "lock-in" the Train Line Vacuum,
(2)  One to admit Air into the Train Line to relieve the Vacuum and release the Brakes.

Were any parts of the Vacuum Brake system on #9 when she arrived from CT???
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on December 08, 2015, 11:47:43 AM
Jason,  noted your "excitement" over the performance of the Eames system.  If it does work as expected in regular service, is the plan to equip the rest of the fleet to include #10?  If yes, then what would be your preferred order of equipment to receive the brake system upgrades?  And by the way, congrats on a magnificent job on #9.  Although I had only a very tiny part in the rebuild I was so proud to see her rolling - again BRAVO !!!!!!!
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Paul Uhland on December 08, 2015, 06:10:57 PM
John...10 has steam-activated brakes, I read recently.
Will that work?
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on December 08, 2015, 06:32:48 PM
Steam brakes are setup to act as brakes on the engine only.  Train brakes utilize either the Eames or Westinghouse systems.  One being a vacuum activated system versus the compressed air system that is standard on U.S. railroads.  With the return of #9 with a working Eames system we now have the ability to run trains with a full braking system (if the passenger equipment is so equipped), versus what we now have which is engine brakes and train crew using the cars handbrakes for stopping.  With the steep grades to be incurred going down from TOM I'm sure the BOD and Jason in particular will be deciding what will need to be done with the revenue equipment in order to have a safe but historically accurate trainset.  Hence my previous post.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jason M Lamontagne on December 08, 2015, 07:04:37 PM
Some details on the Eames system we plan to install for train brakes:

1.  It will be for train brakes only- they will not actuate engine brakes.
2.  The actuating equipment is completely independent of 9's current Eames system; in fact all 3 locomotives will have the Eames train brake equipment as add-on equipment.
3.  The train brake will be automatic in action- that is, vacuum in the train pipe will be used to hold the brakes off.  Vacuum stored on each car, charged from the vacuum pipe, will also actuate the brakes.  Those details parallel the Westinghouse system.  Unlike Westinghouse, no triple valve (or any other complicated valve) is required.
4.  The system is a historical Eames automatic train brake design- albeit little used because Westinghoise grabbed the market and vacuum brakes become less effective on long (50+) car trains.  The Eames system we are adopting uses a single train pipe (as opposed to two).
5.  While the original WW&F used straight Eames vacuum brakes, the car equipment is nearly identical.
6.  The first set of test equipment is scheduled to be built in our shop this winter.

See ya
Jason
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on December 08, 2015, 10:04:08 PM
Thanks for the clarification Jason.  Are you planning to build the engine independent brake valve assembly from scratch or is there some patterns or old equipment to copy from.  Also, is the plan to equip coach #3 first, then I assume 103, and 312.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Dave Crow on December 09, 2015, 10:24:22 AM
Don't forget Coach 8 and caboose 320, John - the passenger carrying equipment probably comes first, although equipping 309 with a pass-through pipe, as seen in original photos, would be neat for photo shoots.

Dave Crow
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jason M Lamontagne on December 09, 2015, 10:37:28 AM
The plan is to equip every piece of rolling stock with operable brakes eventually.  We even have a plan to slow the flatcars to switch between a "loaded" setting and an "empty" setting.

The test equipment set will include one set of engine controls, which we must build from scratch, one set of Eames car couplings, which we have, and one set of coach equipment (2 cylinders- see below, one reservoir- new, piping- new). 

The test locomotive control equipment will be built from common pipe fittings, assembled and appropriately machined, and installed on a steam locomotive.  One coach will be outfitted. The test will ensue with that arrangment; if successful, the test locomotive equipment will be moved to 52 for permanent use.  Patterns will be made to cast the locomotive control equipment in bronze.

Brian Fanslau gave us one, and MNGRR two, original Eames vacuum brake cylinders, 1880's vintage.  They fit the mounts on coach 3 perfectly, and look like coach 3's original vacuum cylinders (different style than no 9's).  The Eames cylinder can be used either straight or automatic.  The 3 oven to us are all of B&SR lineage.

The control equipment is far less visually intrusive on a locomotive than a westinghouse system would be- everything mounts under the cab (except the engineer's valve of course).  There's a governor, a small reservoir, an engineer's valve, and an equalizing valve.  An emergency dump valve will also be provided.

The steam loco auto brake equipment is stand alone and can be removed quickly to restore an engine to its original state.

The origins RR didn't use auto- but it's a modern accepted industry standard to use an automatic brake; the safety it provides justifies its use.  We feel that adopting the Eames auto system is only a slight exaggeration of what the original railroad did- in keeping with technology of the era, and providing low visual impact on the equipment.  Very similar to our theory on no 9's new frame casting being drawn from a historical dwsign.

See ya
Jason
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Steve Smith on December 10, 2015, 11:10:47 PM
Some details on the Eames system we plan to install for train brakes:

1.  It will be for train brakes only- they will not actuate engine brakes.
2.  The actuating equipment is completely independent of 9's current Eames system; in fact all 3 locomotives will have the Eames train brake equipment as add-on equipment.
3.  The train brake will be automatic in action- that is, vacuum in the train pipe will be used to hold the brakes off.  Vacuum stored on each car, charged from the vacuum pipe, will also actuate the brakes.  Those details parallel the Westinghouse system.  Unlike Westinghouse, no triple valve (or any other complicated valve) is required.
4.  The system is a historical Eames automatic train brake design- albeit little used because Westinghoise grabbed the market and vacuum brakes become less effective on long (50+) car trains.  The Eames system we are adopting uses a single train pipe (as opposed to two).
5.  While the original WW&F used straight Eames vacuum brakes, the car equipment is nearly identical.
6.  The first set of test equipment is scheduled to be built in our shop this winter.



Jason, the part about no triple valve sure is intriguing. You mention this is a historical Eames automatic train brake design, hence this question: Is there a schematic of this system somewhere on line you could refer us to?
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Brendan Barry on February 24, 2016, 08:19:28 PM
Today we had the first successful bench test of the engine control apparatus mockup on compressed air.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74008/IMG_3738.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74008/IMG_3742.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74008/IMG_3747.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74008/IMG_3751.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74008/IMG_3752.jpg)
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Brendan Barry on February 25, 2016, 10:38:04 PM
Today the test mockup was replumbed to closer resemble the installed plumbing layout in the locomotive and retested. The shop crew plans to start building the next piece of the brake system during the coming week. After the next piece is completed the new piece will be plumbed into the existing mockup and bench tested.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74008/IMG_3765.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74008/IMG_3762.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74008/IMG_3760.jpg)
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Wayne Laepple on March 19, 2016, 07:57:19 PM
The pattern for the "pot" for the vacuum cylinders on the cars was delivered to Cattail Foundry on Thursday, along with two smaller parts for the system. They promised to have them available for me to bring to Maine for the spring work weekend.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Brendan Barry on May 27, 2016, 02:14:57 AM
On Wednesday 5/25 we tested the vacuum brakes on coach 8. The test was considered successfull and revealed some items that need a little work. Coach 8 needs some changes to the brake rigging and the brake control assembly on 9 needs a little tweaking.

Firing up 9 for the brake tests.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5270.jpg)

Assembled vacuum brake pots before installation under coach 8.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5201.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5199.jpg)

Backside of a brake pot.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5205.jpg)

Brake pot being vacuum tested for leaks before installation.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5206.jpg)

Vacuum reservoir installed under coach 8. The yello arrow is pointing at the bottom of a brake pot.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5263.jpg)

Jason and Randy working on installing a vacuum pot.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5253.jpg)

Randy and Phil working on brake piping.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5350.jpg)

The brake pot is circled in yellow and the brake vacuum reservoir in red.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5362.jpg)

Brake hoses on coach 8.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5211.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5213.jpg)

Brake hose ends. The connectors were cast from a pattern made from an original WW&F brake hose connector.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5218.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5216.jpg)

Brake hoses on no. 9. The rear brake standpipe is an original from the railroad.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5228.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5225.jpg)

9's front brake hose and trainline plumbing.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5329.jpg)

Brake hoses connected together.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5379.jpg)

Train brake control equipment mounted under the engineer's side of 9. This is the same equipment that was used for the bench testing.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5288.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5286.jpg)

Temporary train brake control valve mounted on 9's backhead. The valve is a trolley air brake valve modified to work with vacuum. After the system is working the valve will be replaced with a cast Eames style valve.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5234.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5280.jpg)

Vacuum gauges for the train brakes. One gauge is for trainline vacuum and the other is for brake application. ( If anyone has a duplex vacuum gauge kicking around we would really like one. ) The original Eames vacuum gauge above the steam pressure gauge is for the seperate engine brakes.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_5281.jpg)

Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Carl G. Soderstrom on May 27, 2016, 02:54:03 AM
Don't know if I ever read or it was explained why stand pipes at end of cars.
Other than the plumbing is lower to the ground compared to the wide gauge cars.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Brendan Barry on May 27, 2016, 12:27:08 PM
Some of the WW&F cars had standpipes and some cars just had the brake hose coming out of the end sills. Stand pipes are pretty common on vacuum systems all over the world.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jason M Lamontagne on May 27, 2016, 02:19:25 PM
Standpipes cause the hose to come down to the coupling from above.  This is necessary as the coupling relies on gravity to hold it together until a vacuum is pulled.

See ya
Jason
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Steve Smith on May 28, 2016, 12:34:50 AM
Thanks so much for the great photo & caption coverage of this fascinating project!
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bill Baskerville on May 28, 2016, 07:03:54 AM
Brandon,

Thanks for the photos.  They are just what I need for the Dailey Grant Application.  I have duly purloined them.

Bill
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Ken Fleming on May 28, 2016, 08:25:02 AM
Do these vacuum hose couplings break apart like glad hand couplings do?  Or must they be broken by hand?
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jason M Lamontagne on May 28, 2016, 09:01:38 AM
They pull apart readily on their own; they need to in order to function as an automatic brake.  They are very simple compared to air brake glad hands as the vacuum holds them together.  They have a crooked leg and a tab/slot which keeps them aligned and together after manual assembly and prior to pulling a train pipe vacuum.

They are Eames all the way.  We have two originals and have made several copies. 

See ya
Jason
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on May 28, 2016, 09:08:00 AM
What kind of brake rigging adjustments were needed on Coach 8?  Or maybe the better question would be what did we learn on Coach 8 that can be transferred to the other rolling stock?
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bill Baskerville on May 29, 2016, 10:28:18 AM
What Jason, Johnathan and many others have accomplished is commendable.  What I haven't seen in this discussion, nor on the Facebook page is the results of the testing down the line and how well the system worked, or didn't work.  Any reports available to share?  Next steps?

Bill
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Paul Uhland on May 29, 2016, 04:05:25 PM
Check out the Welsh Highland Railway site. They appear to have the identical brake hose setup on their locos and cars.
WW&F has far less equipment, making vacuum brake installation quicker, cheaper.
The system is also an added safety factor.
Just another very well done custom improvement.  ;)
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Scott on May 31, 2016, 07:33:00 AM
As a recently-joined member, this is my first post. I regret that some of it will be a little negative. Please understand that I greatly admire what is being achieved by the members of the WW&F Railway Museum. My intention is to contribute, from afar, in what will be an ultimately positive manner.

Safety chains have been discussed in this thread. In the absence of a continuous automatic brake system, safety chains compensate by reducing the likelihood of and controlling the risks associated with train separation in cases of coupling failure. This is necessary so that unbraked cars will not run free, putting occupants and others in danger. A further advantage of keeping the train together is that brakemen will then have the best chance of bringing all of it to rest in a safe manner.

When continuous brakes have been fitted, it may be considered that safety chains will be no longer needed. In the event of train separation, both portions of the train will be brought to rest by the automatic action of the continuous brake.

Having studied the excellent and informative posted photographs of the trial WW&F continuous vacuum brake system, I have noted that end cocks have been included in the brake pipe of each vehicle. Some of these would be accessible by passengers. Accidental or deliberate closing one of these end cocks would remove brake system continuity in a train and a safety hazard would thus be introduced: the locomotive engineer could no longer control the automatic brake system throughout the train and the hazards associated with train separation would be introduced.

Historically, automatic vaccuum brake systems have never incorporated end cocks because they are unnecessary. Hose couplings self-seal onto the mating receptacles (termed “acorns”, because of their shape) that are provided at car ends. The vacuum holds everything together. A hose can be pulled from a receptacle (at the rear of a train) and replaced to prove continuity. Inside a caboose, a Conductor’s Emergency Cock is provided and connected to the brake pipe. By manipulation of that cock a train can be brought to a stand at any time.

End cocks are unsafe, as detailed above, and they are unnecessary. One of the beauties of the vacuum brake is its simplicity. That inherent safety is compromised by the introduction of unnecessary end cocks.

Another advantage of the vacuum brake is that it permits both graduated application and release of the brakes throughout a train. That makes for smooth train handling.

I do understand that the WW&F vacuum brake system is still experimental. I am sure that the proven and exacting approach of the WW&F shop forces will eventually produce a system that will be well worthy of those magnificent trains. I am sure that all realistic standards of safety will be met.

John B Scott
Melbourne
Australia
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on May 31, 2016, 07:44:10 AM
Nice post John, with some well thought out ideas. Perhaps on future versions, the shut off can be moved below the platform.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John McNamara on May 31, 2016, 09:37:35 AM
Concern about end cocks reminds me of:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1953_Pennsylvania_Railroad_train_wreck (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1953_Pennsylvania_Railroad_train_wreck)
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jason M Lamontagne on May 31, 2016, 12:01:04 PM
Hello John,  thanks for your feedback.

Without any previous operating experience with a continuous brake, we wanted to preserve the opportunity to cut off a series of cars under partial application.  Additionally we weren't sure of the receiver's ability to seal, so we opted for valves as we learned the system. 

We'll likely move toward a standard of dumping the train pipe vacuum (full application) prior to uncoupling (and intentionally breaking hoses).  That procedure will allow us to eliminate the dump valves for the reasons you state.  Our initial testing showed the one receiving thimble we have (our Eames receiver doesn't much look like an acorn) to seal quite well. 

At this early stage we haven't yet thought of everything and we do appreciate the feedback.  Private messages can carry more in depth discussions as well. 

Thanks,
Jason

Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on May 31, 2016, 03:47:39 PM
I think the end valve issue can easily be fixed by mounting the valve down at buffer level and just prior to the flex line as is done with standard railroad practice.  I don't know if a smaller version of the standard cut-off cock is available but the lift and rotate feature would prevent accidental movement that could be a safety issue. 

I would suggest following FRA standards as much as practical since we know that is an issue to be faced in the future, might as well be as compliant as possible - less to have to change later...........
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bill Baskerville on June 03, 2016, 05:11:54 PM
I am in the final stages of a grant request for the Vacuum Brake Project and a little bird (actually he isn't terribly little) said Alan Downey did his senior thesis or similar project on the Eames brake system.  Could someone (like Alan) provide a copy of this work so I can perhaps purloin some ideas, or in the words of John McNamara, do some research on his work?

I don't have Alan's email address so if someone could forward this to him that would also help.

Thanks,

Bill
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Alan Downey on June 03, 2016, 05:21:34 PM
Messaged received, Bill. I'll send you an email with some info.

I've just begun manufacturing the hardware for the control valve, and I'm planning on sharing the details of the work on here soon.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Ira Schreiber on June 03, 2016, 07:05:44 PM
It was Tom Leher who wrote:
"Plagiarize, plagiarize, plagiarize, but always call it "original research""
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bill Baskerville on June 03, 2016, 11:14:47 PM
I wonder from where Tom got it.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John McNamara on June 03, 2016, 11:51:28 PM
It was Tom Leher who wrote:
"Plagiarize, plagiarize, plagiarize, but always call it "original research""
Yes. I gave proper credit to Tom Lehrer in an email to Bill.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on June 04, 2016, 12:18:21 AM
Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, after all. :)

(The above saying is supposedly attributed to Charles Caleb Colton [1780-1832], but I haven't verified the reference.)
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bill Baskerville on June 04, 2016, 11:55:51 AM
I have just begun to peruse what Alan sent to me, and wow.... Alan, along with Jason, really did a lot of research and work, compiling a history on the Eames systems.  Then he has designed, made the patterns and is now fabricating the valve assembly.  He is now creating the machine drawings for each custom part.  What an amazing amount of work.  All coming out of Texas.

It just shows a part the enthusiasm and effort that comes together from all over our country to make the WW&F the great museum it is.

Bill
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on June 04, 2016, 12:21:22 PM
Might be a good idea to gather all the knowledge gained and if certified, apply for a patent on the new system.  You never know what may turn out to be a good business product.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on June 04, 2016, 10:08:32 PM
But if the design is substantially based on Eames' work, wouldn't that count as "prior art"?
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Terry W. Shirley on June 05, 2016, 04:52:34 PM
Alan, where in Texas are you located?  I'm in Arlington.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on June 05, 2016, 06:10:56 PM
Philip,

If my memory serves me correctly, patent are only for 7 years unless updated and renewed.  I doubt highly if the Eames patents were kept up.  If anyone has better info, please chime in.  Single or triple please, 5 chimes are just too loud....... ;)
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on June 05, 2016, 06:28:52 PM
If anyone has better info, please chime in.  Single or triple please, 5 chimes are just too loud....... ;)

Ha!
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John McNamara on June 05, 2016, 06:43:35 PM
Wikipedia has some interesting information about patents. The life has varied at different periods of history. The expiration of an old patent does not protect you from the "prior art" problem about filing a new patent for something that is basically the same old invention. However, a novel enhancement to the Eames design might well be patentable. [Disclaimer: I am not a patent attorney, nor do I play one on TV.]
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Ira Schreiber on June 05, 2016, 07:03:05 PM
John:
Did you stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night?
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Alan Downey on June 05, 2016, 07:44:35 PM
Terry, I'm in the North Dallas area, at UT Dallas.

Regarding the patent discussion, it's an exciting idea- but I'm not sure what the benefit would be. As John M and Philip have indicated, our system is largely based on multiple existing Eames patents. The expiration of the patent only ends the monopoly on the the rights to the idea, it doesn't mean the concept can be re-patented by someone else. There are undoubtedly some novel implementations which have the potential to pass muster, but it would require a patent attorney to suss it out, and defend it against prior art claims.

I think a more valuable thing for us to do, will be to write a paper, or a series of papers- a treatise* if you will... we can write about the history of the original design, our implementation, and our results. As we publish these, they can help boost our credibility and notoriety for our unique focus of preservation, and the legitimacy of the work we do here. I think that could be much more effective at boosting the museum- just my two cents.

*Full disclosure, this was actually Jason's idea
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on June 05, 2016, 10:33:40 PM
I think a more valuable thing for us to do, will be to write a paper, or a series of papers- a treatise* if you will... we can write about the history of the original design, our implementation, and our results. As we publish these, they can help boost our credibility and notoriety for our unique focus of preservation, and the legitimacy of the work we do here. I think that could be much more effective at boosting the museum- just my two cents.

*Full disclosure, this was actually Jason's idea

Alan, if you and Jason could compile your research on the Eames vacuum brake into book form I think it would be a tremendously valuable contribution, and I would certainly buy a copy. The Eames system in its various forms has received very little scholarly attention (I have been able to find only one reference to it in 75 years' worth of the R&LHS Bulletin, for example), and I think you are probably now the world authorities on it simply by default!

Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Scott on June 06, 2016, 09:03:24 AM
I would be interested to know whether any of the Maine Two-footers ever had a single pipe continuous automatic Eames vaccuum brake?
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Alan Downey on June 06, 2016, 11:05:43 AM
Hi John,

No railroad has ever had Eames automatic brakes. While Fred Eames developed and patented the system, it was never actually made. This is why so much of our implementation had to be designed form scratch, based only on the concepts laid out in the patents. However, both the SR&RL, and the B&SR had Eames straight vacuum brakes, and I think (?) the WW&F had them on the passenger equipment, and I think the KC had them as well. Jason is really the expert here. You can still see the entire vacuum system (and tandem positive pressure air brake system) underneath the Rangeley which is kind of amazing when you decipher the piping and valves. We also have a few of the original vacuum brake cylinders from B&SR box cars which are identical to the ones formerly under Coach 3, and we plan to repair them and put them back into service on under Coach 3.

Philip, we'll start with the treatise and see where that goes!
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Dave Crow on June 06, 2016, 11:34:49 AM
I believe one or both of the coaches at the Sandy River museum in Phillips also have both braking systems underneath; there were photos of the frame for #5, I believe, showing both the vacuum pots and the Westinghouse reservoir and cylinder.

Dave Crow
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on June 06, 2016, 12:16:08 PM
The SR&RL went through a transition period in the 1910s-1920s (coinciding with MEC ownership) when some of their locomotives had vacuum brakes and some had air brakes, so the passenger cars at least had to be fitted with both (which I assume would also have required two sets of brake hoses). I don't know about the freight equipment though.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Wayne Laepple on June 06, 2016, 12:17:47 PM
Some of the British narrow gauge locos are equipped with a valve that can control steam, air and vacuum brakes. I'm not sure if that's all at the same time, though!
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Alan Downey on June 06, 2016, 01:29:05 PM
Philip, when I studied the brake hardware underneath the Rangeley (and got all sorts of weird looks from most of the other patrons), I found an impressive arrangement of check valves which meant that both the Westinghouse and Eames systems worked off of the same single train pipe with no manual manipulation of the system to go from one operating mode to the other. The end hose was not present, but I would assume they would have used a traditional Westinghouse gladhand for the pressure retention requirements. This would also mean that their vacuum equipped engines would have been equipped with the same Westinghouse fittings- surely making poor Fred Eames roll over in his grave. Seeing such an elaborate but elegant solution was surprising and impressive to say the least. I strongly encourage fellow brake nerds to crawl around on the floor of MNG to check the whole thing out.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on June 06, 2016, 03:11:05 PM
Wow, very neat information, Alan. Thank you.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Scott on June 09, 2016, 10:25:23 AM
I greatly appreciate seeing the excellent and most informative posts concerning the Eames brake system. My question about a possible precedent for a single pipe Eames continuous automatic brake system was based on my suspicion that no precedent existed, and that has been confirmed.

Mention has been made of the challenge to develop an Eames-like continuous automatic brake system that will satisfy the needs of the WW&F. I gather that considerable progress has been made.

It has been stated that the sensible approach of referring to Eames patents for design inspiration has been adopted. I think that such an approach must bring worthwhile results, if faithfully pursued. It would be of concern, however, if the WW&F were to adopt too much of the style of the Great Little Trains of Wales, great though they might be.

When planning a vacuum train brake system, one of the decisions is how to integrate the operation of the locomotive brake system with that of the trailing vehicles. Historically, commonly applied options included:
1.   Apply automatic vacuum brakes to the locomotive so that it becomes just another part of a train; or
2.   Use steam or air brakes on the locomotive that may be independently controlled when working light engine and that may be vacuum-controlled, via a vacuum/steam or vacuum/air proportional valve, from the train brake system.

For the WW&F, neither of these options is easily applicable because the locomotive brake is “straight” vacuum. Awkwardly, the need arises to provide vacuum for two separate vacuum brake systems that need vacuum creation at differing times.

The heritage value of the existing Eames Vacuum Driver Brake that is fitted to locomotive #9 is such that it should not be altered. This makes the integration of the two brake systems most difficult – or impracticable.

I have studied published photographs but I am not entirely clear as to how the various issues have been addressed in the design of the prototype continuous automatic vacuum brake. If the two systems have been kept completely separate, then there would be a need for them to be separately manipulated in service. If the two systems have been integrated, then that might spell compromise for the Eames Vacuum Driver Brake.

It would greatly clarify if we could see a schematic diagram of the prototype brake system. Then it would be clear what equipment is installed and how the various parts are interconnected. A scan of a good sketch would do.

I am not sure whether it applies throughout the WW&F but I assume that the overall aim is to preserve or recreate the state of affairs that applied on the railroad at the time of its closure, in 1933. I know that is so for locomotive #9.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bill Baskerville on June 09, 2016, 02:01:25 PM
John,

Someone more knowledgeable on the systems like Jason or Alan can address the practicality of integrating the loco and train brakes.  I do know that 9 has vacuum brakes, 10 has steam brakes, (oxford comma John) and 52 has air pressure brakes.  I suspect the answer will be that they will always be independent and it will be engineering training and experience that governs how they are used.  I have seen in Jason's writings that he prefers to use train brakes as it makes for a smoother passenger experience and saves the locomotive brakes, which are more expensive than rolling stock brakes to replace.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Alan Downey on June 09, 2016, 02:03:11 PM
While the Maine two footers and the Eames system have close ties to Welsh heritage, our system is a decidedly American implementation of an automatic vacuum brake system. The American approach to brake systems has not been to integrate train and locomotive brakes on a single control, but to have two separate control valves. We intend to follow this practice, which will also maintain the historical integrity of #9's straight vacuum engine brakes, and work well alongside the engine brakes on the rest of our fleet. This also will allow the engine crew to rely less upon the engine brakes, spreading brake shoe wear out through 16+ shoes, rather than just the engine.

Regarding a schematic- with tweaks and changes being made to the system during it's testing, it would be premature for us to publish a schematic. We will be pleased to include a schematic and an explanation of the system in the treatise which will be published after testing and implementation has been completed.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Keith Taylor on June 11, 2016, 09:51:29 PM
Alan, modern train brakes (Westinghouse type) while they do have two control valves are not seperate. Applying the train brake will also apply the locomotive brakes. Applying the locomotive's independant brake will only apply the brakes on the locomotives. If you apply the train brakes and do not want the engine brakes to apply....you have to bail off the independant brake.
Keith
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Scott on June 13, 2016, 07:47:47 AM
I have an original catalog from the Eames Vacuum Brake Company. It is undated, but it comes from the 1880s, I think. I thought I would share a diagram from the catalog, that illustrates the vacuum ejector of the Driver Brake equipment that is fitted to locomotive 9.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Scott on June 13, 2016, 08:01:57 AM
That was my first attempt at posting an image at this site. My intention is to spread some precise knowledge about the equipment and to illustrate the Eames style, when it comes to brake equipment.

The brake equipment of locomotive 9 also incorporates the brake rigging arrangement that was termed "Style A" in the Eames catalog.

The diagram, above, includes the operating lever, which is mounted vertically on locomotive 9. The lever is linked to the operating shaft of the ejector. Backward movement of the lever opens the steam valve so that vacuum is created and the brake is applied. In the mid position of the lever, the release valve H and the steam valve J are both closed. Forward movement of the lever closes the steam valve and opens the release valve, which destroys the vacuum and releases the brake.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Scott on June 13, 2016, 08:09:37 AM
The diagram, below, illustrates the Eames Style A brake rigging of locomotive 9.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Alan Downey on June 29, 2016, 01:16:42 AM
I thought I'd give a short update/teaser on the control valve project.

Rick Rowlands did the casting for this project, so he, the W.A. Young Machine Shop, and Youngstown Steel Heritage Museum have my many thanks!

While there are plenty of off the shelf bits of hardware, the bulk of the valve is custom hardware. Here are some of the parts I've made so far...


Valve plunger seals, and a spring loaded tool to install/remove them

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_l7cjou1ZWssK-j6K2PdiW31x6chjlh4givCZvvUb7-4IpbvG5C4h18U4yuJx_UFtlLC1j4JkvSeVrt39tjeWxivOnjQ-_Hf8IskiHSlZ4WqKuXrAPJ9FhCTQ1sBh6Aa1ucR7qjTvE0RCoDAwHDb9bc08U3DsxwwKaXSJ4uO6a_fom_jN98rUYolN8qKDrqIEkjM5q3sPyJjjWeBvp92oX3EhX_C_dAwT9gXoXprr8AsHhv78F1EjXC14ov7Z7lrtUKtdnDEQxl4BI9YELLmBkRC7QMSWMz8LSImaZAekzayDgdPS7dnyLrIWicpMpEBreF065-Bd59_9xjJYITJnDT7xaHNUljM2WlVxMe1CZ5Eesqd7HFPKOCIAc-lz91rz8gY52ijNhjWEqCikEyOaGfnGMP2y_r3tKA_lecmXcVzdU5vD5HgC_kOMGZaTzLaHN_qkvthcxDE-ftGE9HWAS7iIGSmGAyK440YP_qE7LgkpUiwm227EjaU3H_f6_oH-CXnycCxWkkHfQmZKJjhthA9jezmH98izI01xDBCPd3iNFwxml1THIL9FQxQNqf0lK6rQpEfKxPykTPrSfnHUKev74FxQQ4=w1306-h979-no)


Handle blanks, their bolts, and a mandrel which I'll use to turn the blanks.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Np7BeQS_jZVUTiENdjpgu93WV5dhKnjKMx3WgnIS5OeYCvvxqylcn7IbU57lCCSnB8mofGt2k3RmKQ5HyoGYwd0h5mNDKVc4wupB4w6Sbg4gCmrVAtZeXatjr5mzqKxia8mr1MQ2L3KDPfa5259chGtiTpsI3oUDRpRsGtukMCOnv0M7gdhVbYe8SUAAkdE5Ps7eggYydy_n6qPYToxdzZryaL5EwlDldY1eQpdToWLzu-h3y3Jt88bhTdI2d5meWy0gFG-eNCcGGRcFhWV6sAUCcAi27L19hWL1Nq3zVwCE7g0WbDkaoqYlepLb_AMRdwuMb0HtLsZxiXf6PdkqNpk8CoznFspLlY9pXLzrjGDOyJCBcl41wLPLHUfy3Z9x7bkr6rsPPKbcw7eq64NZRmXMTN7sRFC6sTH5-8FXxuqqu3RHGng78IrfJAtLu9FCBKpGGIWevDDojn5OsHGbrYpHcmjVR1piB9SFO7iWuJJndExzhlEpvCZzxs4e4DHmiEDno-XuuyrmsCErea-sIatL_Ro-V7gPKwhfjQ2JinZ4SalgfIWDhOyWVet5QsrgxvpZnc_jazP9OFEMBL4jq2fqwFSTh8g=w1359-h1019-no)


I received the castings this past weekend, so I've begun machining them as well. This work is a combination of manual and CNC operations. The shop where I work at UT Dallas has knee mills that can be used in both modes, and it allows for efficiency gains when working on "production" type projects like this. Simple things, or one offs I'll do manually, but with many repeated operations across all three valves, I've been using that capability more than I typically do.


I've started working on the valve bodies- establishing primary datum planes and putting in hole patterns. Each valve requires seven setups, so these will be the most time consuming part to finish by far. Side note, I made the aluminum fixture plate in anticipation of this project and working on these castings, and its paid off after just two days. I've been really thrilled with how easy it is to set up small parts, and add sub fixtures.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/InxryBT9b1ycO4bBF0Cwq5lTlPoM8OZBVc2d9pJqkCxdLjeiSYu8EYcYjOv-e_dvN6zQqCYkYFcpNbWjkIVj_I2tku3fdDHC29YZZxXJC5xkSc6RLFt30WMaXiuKM_sR6X3S-3v5Byf9-8_6Hbpit1xgQQn3X8aBxDc5t-RXqOAh38Nww5ppTjnhFz8IgdHDeLgomBvxY8OnKZME_ru8JwG2RhysQWQbL12I5VTPdn32gshZRJfqHndKwsBoDuF1hEvqCSXjNkYFFPQltiZYNxhV5iv9JkCYRI9hrhJWPidPA1dtVUabNZaAc8qiIDYBtG-3pBmEGxiMTR-PvzXK_-0g2vjcdW4QnERR3kM4iJyTdnvqxxPk8qZbKAK2DQijHl-ZfPHeGm57hT_ROhccXrpnaWC1W0RdUK5Em2U7jG7iFuqfRWfNGMrjkfF7qKaMd7M2CpiVN3AFMivS5nAOiYTA0MYnL_npCMpCdif3twVE060ZF9oNYbdU86Y8bOm5MI900S12Pi6uJcSNnL0RacXZ6KH1jLt3Xek4O5wrmYMXT6GHz2JwOCW1w8CcsupwGjWwxdQBb5ZTUgRl1PYRmjeHW1fYpJc=w1359-h1019-no)


The quadrants are almost finished, needing only grooves for detents.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/dNnlukh-z-4R1Xo7yRvIGn_MDlsnVOBY1hon9ZnezStmsi5pZZR5FuPrQv0iqu7-dBiMAMo9fTDqcYpn-vQcAiqbD1_KbZ0YeyJ0YAzryvXiUTluldEhEO_o2L37hogeFg26TWi61jBGftmo2RniZpb_fqQEeUvtKIgF7yUAUNzqIHtTDNQ_gQVJGceO3mrlRcJpxoSAwB4cT6eg-k2U-GwPxrisCMaCUQskr48lSfIEzSexmK80-MV3jJDcGOAK-Eov7VfoFGfjB83E-jQluSuy5qFMkd_JUcj_Uu0tFcduZyzRFOFg_VdseKeQTl7Aoqgn9qnQp22hmBuY0FZuD5xxv1wCamM2ZRci_2rBgu9nH5A5ijTJSNUi-Qgii2-qoWbazipGRxTDfYe1EjcpGh_ON_GxuspvruaoE_parvURdj-VQiONW36jo8kD0aREZFvlQu_3qrnp-wp4yP63Xc47F0tJVACE-BvU9u_KrQl87cSt1379oCjCJrTK_kWHqKnLTfjmCrlKcFCF3x2BZVv2CgDA65yFHRf-SQaUHVpPhAVTeej3OrELHSA83AA9M8e7GLKKdLgGhM-uyNT1GHSSeKM-dAM=w1359-h1019-no)


The levers are almost done as well, just missing the detent guide hole and handle mount. I plan to finish them tomorrow.

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/eOgKczvAthYzkYaj79z12U41J2ASUAwEPo0CG4bQMw2h84cmnzc0JZobhMpXLP0pGn6EtXV-ebcYhujclDjtZnT0exlmm0W3Yw-e4cjudvep-0wX7Lj59iAyzQNw1M9VWx3jvUZpGMO11UAc0UQqxJ6QU2CxjF65jeJ6w5k0dZ3D1tQ-9UUB4tkQX2ijzjnKy1g7DzS8hnwudpL_njgNpf7SkO3RWKh6yJq4WIco3wgr3RJjsC3U4IhFp3cN0wL5VqnsyjOTQmgltb4ljlVPnGkMldjBTD1kYUcNC50lHgReK5I-z54lMAGsi0eWa53D2vfS3SSvk5N4R54OkL-p2Vau3Kq948Gn2L7irYCpwnGDb-M-Y5sQdkIc9yK_P0RZWE0ECc5ESF47Dk0bgaqyUa8cIvLu1DY9pWCD7if0oA7yIcgYDveOOlbJCBCGCBL0rah7P6tG8C6pnBn_VR7xnhgkFSqiRqeg2bXkFWWcOlm4KFCblXlYqhwlf_UwcuoMpXfCTwdo8P8UPjvxGRc5Je2ughpNPSkLiVzggskpJBM_3has6bLdzPUPcqGg8bk0jd7lXvA6oOLSs9MN3FrGhOW3obYVJnM=w1359-h1019-no)

I still need to make the actual valves, turn the handles, finish the valve bodies, and make a run of custom fasteners to hold everything together. I think it might have been possible to buy bolts that would've gotten the job done, but I've got some special touches in mind that should really complement the aesthetics of the rest of the valve. Anyway... more later.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Gordon Cook on June 29, 2016, 11:00:03 AM
OOOOoooo! Lovely work!
Be still my heart!!

Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John McNamara on June 29, 2016, 11:29:43 AM
Wow!! Incredible workmanship ;D ;D

BTW, Gordon, we over-50 people should avoid using the phrase "Be still my heart!"
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Stewart "Start" Rhine on June 29, 2016, 01:17:13 PM
Beautiful work Alan, thanks for the update.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on June 29, 2016, 04:11:04 PM
Very impressive work, Alan. Thank you for sharing your progress with us!
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Ira Schreiber on June 29, 2016, 04:17:02 PM
True works of art and design.
Thanks Alan
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Carl G. Soderstrom on June 30, 2016, 01:23:19 AM
Just WOW

Thanks Alan

And thanks for the update.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Dave Crow on June 30, 2016, 11:05:51 AM
Very nice work, Alan!
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jeff Schumaker on June 30, 2016, 08:43:01 PM
Fantastic work, Alan.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bill Baskerville on July 01, 2016, 11:34:26 PM
Yesterday James and I visited the Cass Mountain Railway and took the ride to Bald Knob.  We noticed that on all descents they tied down the brakes on each car in addition to the air brakes.  We were told that the engineer then makes a small air application as needed.  The brakemen (and women) would check often to be sure that none of the wheels locked.  I guess they use that method since they don't have retainers in their system.

My understanding is that we won't have that compressed air problem of a limited number of applications down a given grade.  Is this correct?

Bill
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Stone on July 02, 2016, 09:53:34 PM
I think one advantage of a straight vacuum brake system is the lack of reservoirs to deplete. As long as you have enough steam to blow out a vacuum, you've got brakes available.
How this will differ with WW&F's improved vacuum system is something for those knowledgeable gents in the R&D department to expound upon.
Which brings up another thought: will #52 be vacuum brake equipped? If so, I'm guessing blowing out air to create a vacuum?

John   
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike the Choochoo Nix on July 02, 2016, 10:50:10 PM
[quote author=John Stone link=topic=2524.msg28109#msg28109 date=1467510814
Which brings up another thought: will #52 be vacuum brake equipped? If so, I'm guessing blowing out air to create a vacuum?

John   
[/quote]
Just pull the vacuum from the motors intake manifold, that's how the old semi's did it, I have friend whose father had a semi trailer with vacuum brakes and that's how it was done.
Mike Nix
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bill Baskerville on July 02, 2016, 11:00:02 PM
I know Jason's plan is, once the initial testing is complete, to put the No 9 locomotive test stand in 52.  I don't know how he intends to create vacuum, from the intake manifold is one possibility, using compressed air thru a venturi instead of steam to create vacuum is another possibility.  He will have to address that.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Rick Rowlands on July 03, 2016, 08:49:23 AM
I am so happy to see that the castings are machining up well! 

A little story on the production of the castings.  My original intent was to produce the castings from Alan's patterns at the WA Young Foundry & Machine Shop.  I reactivated their coke fired crucible furnace, which had not operated since before WWII,  and successfully melted bronze in it.  I brought down three molds to pour, but for various reasons all three ended up as short pours.   We had planned to try again, but word got out to the press that we were to be running the furnace, and since I did not have permission for the metal pour to be a public event, I had to cancel it.  Then about three days later the site was hit with torrential rains and enough water came down the hillside behind the building to penetrate the rear wall and run like a river right down the middle of the casting floor and out the front door!

By now I was very late in getting the castings finished, so to save time (Youngs is a 2 1/2 hour drive from Youngstown) I fabricated a temporary crucible furnace out of some 3" thick refractory board that I had salvaged from a steel mill, borrowed a propane forge burner and set out to melt the bronze in the J&L 58's enginehouse.   Over two separate days I ran that furnace and melted down enough old Lunkenheimer, Walworth and Crane valve bodies to cast all nine parts that Alan needed. 

I used to work in the foundry industry, from making 100 ton iron castings to tiny nonferrous parts, but pretty much gave it up several years ago.  But it all came back to me fairly rapidly, and now I have caught the casting bug again .  I will probably pour more bronze down at Young later in the year,  and have plans for the construction of an iron cupola furnace in Youngstown now as well.   From the same steel mill I also salvaged about 1,000 lbs. of SAE 660 bearing bronze, furnace fodder for a new set of rod bushings for the J&L 58 and whatever else comes along. 

The vacuum brake castings were produced absolutely free of charge as a way to help support the work of the WW&F. 

Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Rick Rowlands on July 03, 2016, 09:04:39 AM
The valve body molds were rather interesting to make.  The cores for the internal passages are exceptionally tiny, and usually broke when taking them out of the core box.  I would then glue them together and then sand and fit to get them to sit still in the mold. 

For these castings I did not use greensand but instead used a nobake process that is alkyd based.  Mix 2% by weight resin into the sand, then add 1/2% co-reactant and mix it in.  I did 25 lb. batches in a 5 gallon bucket with a paddle on a drill for mixing.  A concrete mixer is a very effective and low cost mixer for no bake when there are larger batches to be made.  The molds set up in an hour or so, ready to strip and make the next one.  I carved risers and gates into the molds with a stone on an air grinder.  The nice thing about nobake is that the molds are practically indestructible with normal handling.  I can make molds today, put them on a shelf and pour them in 10 years and still be perfectly usable. 

Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Ira Schreiber on July 03, 2016, 09:09:30 AM
Rick, I am very impressed. Thanks for all your hard work and dedication.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jeff Schumaker on July 04, 2016, 05:59:17 PM
What Ira said.

Jeff S.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Stephen Piwowarski on July 04, 2016, 11:29:29 PM
Thanks Rick! These look great- nice contribution. My wife and I are headed through your neck of the woods in late August. We'll have to see what your up to!

Steve
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Carl G. Soderstrom on July 05, 2016, 02:23:49 AM
Thanks Rick & Thanks for the explanation.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Scott on August 01, 2016, 11:52:20 PM
The latest (July / August 2016) issue of the Museum newsletter carries an excellent article describing vacuum automatic brake equipment to be fitted to passenger cars operating on the WW&F Railway. The article is very well thought out and it is nicely illustrated.

Some of the vacuum equipment that will be needed on cars is not dealt with in the newsletter article, including the Release Valve that is needed on each car to enable its brakes to be bled off and the Conductor’s Valve that should be fitted on each passenger car to enable the application of the train brakes in an emergency. The design of these valves involves special consideration as they must not permit dirt or moisture to enter the vacuum brake system.

The normal strategy for obtaining the function of a Release Valve is to arrange for the check valve that is described in the newsletter article to be manually lifted, when desired. This produces equalisation of the pressures on either side of the brake piston, allowing it to fall as a result of the action of gravity on the mass of the brake rigging (assuming vertical mounting of the brake cylinder). The Release Valve mechanism can be sealed from the atmosphere by a diaphragm in a manner similar to that employed for the brake cylinder piston rod.

The actuating mechanism of the Release Valve of a car (typically a pull chain or light rodding) should be arranged for manual operation from either side of the car. When the braking system of a car needs to be cut out (because of some defect), means are needed to tie back the actuating mechanism of the Release Valve to keep the valve open.

A Conductor’s Valve needs to incorporate some means for the filtration of incoming atmospheric air. The valve should be designed to remain open, following manual activation, until all brake pipe vacuum has been destroyed.

As indicated in the newsletter article, the car equipment for the vacuum automatic brake system can be relatively simple. Equipping the locomotives will present greater challenge as there are additional issues to be considered and provided for.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Wayne Laepple on August 14, 2016, 09:02:22 PM
I spent some time this afternoon with Waynesburg & Washington 2-6-0 No. 9684 at Waynesburg, Pa. Here's a photo of the Eames Vacuum Brake apparatus in the cab.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Rick Rowlands on August 14, 2016, 09:07:49 PM
I documented Wayne documenting the Eames muffler today!
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Wayne Laepple on August 14, 2016, 09:13:20 PM
My best side!

Here's my photo of the muffler.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Wayne Laepple on August 14, 2016, 09:14:11 PM
And one of the entire locomotive.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Steve Smith on August 14, 2016, 10:07:56 PM
Wayne, would that be an inspection pit under the tender and rear half of the loco?
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on August 14, 2016, 10:46:32 PM
Wow, thank you Wayne (and Rick too). The muffler is of more substantial construction than I'd imagined, hardly the "tin can" it's often likened to. It looks like it might even be a casting!
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Rick Rowlands on August 14, 2016, 10:59:33 PM
No inspection pit, just a concrete floor. 
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Alan Downey on August 15, 2016, 02:02:07 AM
Great pictures of the Eames hardware! Thanks Rick and Wayne for gathering the details on the muffler. Considering the scarcity of vacuum brake equipment in the US, its lucky that we have a reference piece. Hopefully the internals aren't too much of a pain to make.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Wayne Laepple on August 15, 2016, 07:22:35 AM
The Eames apparatus in the cab appears to be a combination ejector and operating valve in one piece. The muffler body seems to be a fabrication, although the top looks like a casting. I was surprised how large it is, about the size of a gallon paint can.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Rick Rowlands on August 15, 2016, 08:22:47 AM
I am working with the Greene County Historical Society on the W&W No.4 now.  I'm currently working on an idea to be able to move the locomotive on compressed air by feeding air directly to the valve chests.  Their Plymouth diesel mechanical is out of service so the only option to get the loco to move is by air.  They like to move it outside during their annual Harvest Festival, but have been unable to do so in a few years.

The W&W coach that is sitting outside under a tarp also needs moved into the building, which is still awaiting the installation of a concrete floor.  Its a little over a 2 hour drive down there from my house so I can only make trips down occasionally.   But they did put up a new steel building for it, so when its finished the two remaining pieces of W&W equipment will be well protected. 
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike the Choochoo Nix on August 15, 2016, 08:58:07 AM
Rick, why don't they move the locomotive with a cable and a truck or a winch? A couple of snatch blocks if they can't get a direct pull, put a post at the end of the track in the building to pull it back in. Not a big deal to move something that rolls.
Mike Nix
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Scott on August 15, 2016, 09:39:14 AM
The Eames equipment on W&W No. 4 is to US Patent 228743, which can be accessed here: https://www.google.com/patents/US228743 . That equipment is designed for non-automatic continuous vacuum train brakes. I believe it could be adapted for use for the control of automatic continuous vacuum train train brakes on the WW&F.

On W&W No. 4 the vertical lever releases the brake by admitting atmospheric air to the brake pipe. The horizontal lever admits steam to create vacuum to apply the brakes. The push button, below, allows selection as to whether or not driver brakes will apply when the train brakes are applied. The vacuum ejector is contained within the main vertical body of the equipment and it exhausts steam and air through the cab roof.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Scott on August 15, 2016, 09:55:16 AM
A top view, with muffler, of a Sydney steam tram Baldwin motor can be seen here: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/af/NSWGT_Tram_Motor_No._1A_Top_View.jpg .

One of these in action can be seen here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WnPcduIGdWc .

A web search for < steam_scene_vol5_issue5.pdf > will produce further relevant information.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Rick Rowlands on August 15, 2016, 05:47:08 PM
Rick, why don't they move the locomotive with a cable and a truck or a winch? A couple of snatch blocks if they can't get a direct pull, put a post at the end of the track in the building to pull it back in. Not a big deal to move something that rolls.
Mike Nix

I am going for simplicity.  Cables and snatch blocks get to be rather complicated for someone to deal with and involves a lot of farting around to get things set up. My system utilizes an air compressor and one hose coupled into a Chicago fitting on the side of the loco.  With an inline oiler and a ball valve to control flow, just set the Johnson bar the direction you want to go and open the valve.  The inline oiler assures that the cylinders will be lubricated, something that cannot be guaranteed moving it with any other method. 
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bill Baskerville on May 26, 2017, 10:43:09 PM
For those interested, The latest NRHS News announces the award of eight NRHS Heritage Grants.  One was:

• $3,000 to the Wiscasset Waterville and Farmington Railway
Museum, in Alna, Maine, to outfit its equipment with an
1881 automatic vacuum braking system patented by Eames
and originally utilized by its locomotives and cars.

https://admin.nrhs.com/NRHSNews/NRHS_News_June_2017.pdf

As it occurs, we should post our progress on their facebook page.

Bill



Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Brendan Barry on February 05, 2018, 03:32:48 PM
Jonathan repairing an old B&SR vacuum brake cylinder by expoxying a stainless steel sleeve into the bore. This cylinder will go on coach 3 when finished.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74009/IMG_7966.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74009/IMG_7968.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74009/IMG_7965.jpg)
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bill Baskerville on February 06, 2018, 12:24:26 AM
I am glad to see that, even with all that is going on in the shops and down the line, we are still advancing the Eames vacuum brake project. 

Has anyone thought to make a progress post on the Facebook or web page of the grant provider?
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Scott on February 06, 2018, 03:39:15 AM
Agreed. Furthermore, I would very much like to see a copy of the intended vacuum brake system schematic drawing.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: James Patten on February 06, 2018, 08:04:34 AM
I don't see enough clamps there.  I think you need a few more.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Steve Smith on February 06, 2018, 11:49:12 AM
James, you gunning to be elected Vise President or somethin ? ;D
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on February 06, 2018, 12:03:09 PM
Careful, our Moderator may have to clamp down on this topic!  ;D
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bill Baskerville on February 06, 2018, 12:18:17 PM
All these comments about clamps is putting a strain on the subject.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Ed Lecuyer on February 06, 2018, 12:46:07 PM
Careful, our Moderator may have to clamp down on this topic!  ;D
Actually, I find the conversation quite gripping.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Scott on February 07, 2018, 07:03:50 AM
As they always say, them's the brakes!
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Robert Hale on February 08, 2018, 11:01:15 AM
I'm glued to the forum watching all the friendly bonding going on.  :o
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on July 20, 2018, 08:01:04 PM
Recent castings of brake pots..(http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m573/miketrainnut/IMG_3182_zpscs4i7ikf.jpg)
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Joe Fox on July 20, 2018, 08:57:05 PM
They look great. Can't wait till we have them in service on our trains. :) I can not say it enough, we are very fortunate to have so many wonderfull members, volunteers, and friends.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Harold Downey on June 16, 2019, 11:00:53 AM
Check out this photo of W&Q #1 Baggage and Mail car: https://cdm16397.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/p15323coll6/id/1695/rec/2 (https://cdm16397.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/p15323coll6/id/1695/rec/2)

It's sitting on a standard gauge flat car, and at the left end of the flat car you can see one of its trucks.  Look closely and you can see the Eames vacuum brake pot is mounted on the truck. 
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on June 16, 2019, 03:27:25 PM
When I view it, the left side of the picture is cut-off.  Unable to view the truck.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Harold Downey on June 16, 2019, 05:35:24 PM
You may be missing it.  Click on the double arrows in the top RH corner of the picture, then zoom way in and drag it to see the bottom left corner, just to the left of the brake wheel on the baggage car.  The truck is cut off, but peeking up above the side boards of the flat car. 
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bill Baskerville on June 16, 2019, 06:58:27 PM
What is the vertical lever to the right of the brake wheel?
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on June 16, 2019, 07:23:41 PM
What is the vertical lever to the right of the brake wheel?

That's the cut lever for the coupler.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Alan Downey on June 27, 2019, 10:46:07 PM
The biggest impedance to progress on this project has been the available time of those working directly on it, and to be honest- I was the roadblock for about a year. But the seeds of labor over the last year have borne fruit!

Last fall my father built a pattern for the control valve body. The pattern itself is traditional in its wooden construction and the presence of core-prints, but the molding strategy is anything but. The valve body has a number of cavities and internal features of fairly complex geometry. Producing core boxes for these would have been an onerous and time consuming task, so we decided to skip them! Instead, I designed sand cores which were to be 3D printed using a foundry-specific printing machine and process. We also decided to utilize this process for the valve body cover casting as well, and Ron Ginger very kindly produced the pattern using his CNC router. The tradeoff for using 3D printed sand cores, is that they get very expensive compared to traditional cores and the cost increases by a cubic factor with the overall size. But when the expected casting quantity and core complexity align, it can be quite the tool.

While I worked at Enterprise Foundry, I had been looking for opportunities to bring 3D printed sand cores into the workflow, but we couldn't find the right job to pair with the technology. The vacuum brake controller proved to be just the project we were looking for. So when a critical machine went down around Christmas, I negotiated trade- I would come in during the holiday in my capacity as a WW&F volunteer and make the repair using the WW&F's mag drill. In exchange, Enterprise would pour 10 total molds containing 3D printed sand cores purchased by the WW&F. On Monday, the first two molds were made and poured, and we are thrilled with the results. I want to publicly thank Enterprise for their involvement and donation for this project. Between the value of the iron itself and the time spent in the plant, this constitutes a significant contribution and greatly aided in getting this project closer to the finish line. There were also some great lessons learned from this use of printed cores which will directly apply to a major casting project on the horizon.

Over the last few months, Gordon Cook and Ron Ginger have been producing the many machined components for the internals of the control valve assembly. I don't have any pictures to share of their work, but I look forward to seeing all of their work myself! Finally, three smaller patterns for parts which will be made using traditional foundry methods were completed and handed off to Wayne Laepple to be made at Cattail Foundry.

Finally, as some have noticed- my time spent on-site in Alna has decreased rather significantly from what it had been for the last last couple of years. I recently started a company focused on patternmaking and casting purchasing for the preservation industry- piggybacking off the skills which I first learned through my involvement with the WW&F and my time as the quality engineer at Enterprise Foundry. These patterns and castings are somewhat of a "launch" for Preservation Pattern, showcasing just some of technologies that a 21st century pattern maker has at their disposal now.

Moving forward, Jason and I are planning a day or two to complete the machining on the valve body and the rest of the castings which will allow everything to go together afterwards as we work towards our goal of testing and implementing the complete system.

It was pretty fun going back to Enterprise to supervise the production of these parts. I went in on Monday morning to check the molding, and then went back at 9PM on Tuesday during the night shift to shake out the molds and knock off the risers.
Ron's Pattern
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/GDJLtzpnXn27Mab9HJYilusfjPy6L5RchsUIg2bxu_gYiMVRkbUC3YWF3O6N1wAO9vz0KVRpGT2y5SjVjr3ZuwcGR_9TQ6nhhxc7mpNROiKFEkBGYyUM8JqTSbIPz_3RosJ4p8RBu8wpJz3NzNJ3efHjDXILOY1DP9t7WzY9JgXmIleoKiAJiySVgc79uB3eGLofzs8T43_ZB1vT0WqlqiAZiePFCAsGBfbj8-ebf7KViCfWWBvMf8q2stm-cq6JF1iPEgpJmZ6h3rJW_apCM-5Z9in8O-efGLg3PIy1C7dyS4RHcT7Xa1N1hE3ZqJXJ3qxEKwpXFK3LVF1ylTkyx6N9U9T9qS3jAlAklunEXFeqKTUBB3dO7P6583fZ8h6I3RPPEmGRs5RTy93_tEg1IONuj-JGbtha5bunqt9X_x66D3IVGcX8vmKh-omtbuE04dv6g7wb4_sXRX-qEllexgSDZemiRhed3jKskqXV0sf7d_mNZeL7IedImLSR5sK-ajR9L9dMuZMEHVLfZubCnMlNvRu54MdOZlQTrRT1O7oImqvnO_JwW98UV-lBWRFhA2d1V783Z3FuP_Le3p1zQeY40t4oIRNH-RWGbXm2B-O7XheN_729sQBR8EGdCLDYeLLTGLnfG3CF8zKnI6WDujtjD0FT3DvTDLicmuTKw8NTx7CHPygHU8_Y_T-9KBPZIi8kLxudK1lfF1lPEOC1zkcf=w690-h920-no)

The mold
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/9MK55ZdpJpggEKexkPgUM1Y_6Gk1VntT87kIm-7LK7iOa8CMJoczf-CPdprUORiQPrF9tcfPozWbuN7KUVe5NoALMK45fiCa74FfpfofoVEnmXqfrzoutz73fgWLzXEyg5guutGtLMLjXnqEYlFStPwGKo67EMGVM4mMSD7ieD1u_xKlpUCeW02DGWtQnzqthGaM5Vswa3KFlbdRmvrqUZnozwHNZuhcI_CyTW1-WZwWYcKpfWDCLAVHqmCYfY-TyVT9G3Fep_hrab1cIFqLgMraRN7bO1eO-RWUv5egSXc-l3g4u4QTi-F3CWUxD8i8paD263WGwCSxJ-bDeymuRIYXxai07cxV6itLWn99ELHiAA7HOHmCXJB8Ys4WqsxsXhOIutE3TxDEtDFLKrgS3SNlZKwy7vPHZ5ciE0YpqTds3QiMcsTAr0mzUFcGOC6yZEQrpwkp0m4XnWDJ8WxDyifFhQreKP0-SemRmPJr4hiB-pMgHAaOIod-YKTMWOuwkRX5v5gvwWzrJuFz_V5so67jOY8lViT06CP7UPbM8qPbFkVxVkdqpNyUqvw1WKOefMqOMsJhV7LQiPE5a_m5g5nZIk-f9OJhNBQqwGvvC0pU4ICsa5upihWdT5EsKcM2wMUfAQWDNgHRyHgHZE-avFeL5QfYBrX764V7n3Ke1AHJ2C9gZsf4BhtvPaAD9ojdEMHvOYBTTSeseP6nWOLMeqcy=w1033-h775-no)

Core installed
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-HpfMFMy2OnlInkBMhrwXHzKFcqHZm9zY7gzMYanGyoIEtUDzlpPwUKnO5T7pAT5ZORwRecV6GATUlF6ZgzM8dyl47Bg-Pv_3yG3YmhwvMhiKHKjVBdm68U2AyMO8HGdlo5_QjsRssB8hGGjSRfzgdhVp_7wEYnquhCc1Z1L4Ki5gM_BxeecNNcgrsGKGvCGfxNEhKEksRRi5qEiRvgHhaSqU6wzMyv7TV2hZpVu232Q0NApqXQ9x9p_qXyMsp7OK3xVXkWsaZhWm-70K7CY1c3j3wP09R-rQp71jEDn9m1sj6Y2agk77Ya-lJEIVPi4-GxSZglXDuQ34QuOJ81MH9itmTX3Z3g6tJZX7FR9cFRdALuMI8MBELEEbmwcSXkTszXRguqLyqnsew-ThJy0RKvrLoMP5T83t28rYi2X536dc6dtmHoua6gyms8BTD1mBvu-9eAjIwRJZph1yssNhu1nOvJxvJ9ZSJ6V980YlFbtC6UvjvtL7_3AjGHgodZpQ0gqi57qzlVNzcmTRuiI_k94OeZArJ1PwZk_4oxKVi-a-Lg5BWzoQuzYLjEGm2WRhlnn5lH_FeVucKR77rohdC8emhpdGXn-1YB9-TIKUrYqWwkNij6_hu7CagYai841mdeaqxqDKBEB5UYYDLWY9hYNl1jTuKZicqmRShSGK44VImhK3B452jhSVPlvqhu_LP9ZI0Fw5MY9nTsaVBauUAcB=w1292-h970-no)

The raw casting after being cleaned
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/DhTfMiLG5GfXR5pWROlnDwaZFKZi0FG8f_WG0qwYWNFNzZ4UFS0dYcnVvHQe_dH0IXkgsDhNsV6YKB4dOb3Bhu4igNducd6m-TjmSzW7UVEMOH3W-v-KssQ7fHqVh8BbcGr-YjzesG5SH-90kn6zuJ_lWo7Fs0AagLzKI-1JDxy8U4vyOz-cSO-ufiOOoMT2dJfQvgIif0Y51UStryBW1LvAOH65JpqO5pBLMgvoxq5UrtSBDSwrblZa8ywwBHpd0WneIWWLdRGgVVQhHXofLhXLJU7nVB3_Qdop-iekd8K5nJ6mCPr0naAnXnzIavoj4kSGDZYAsT0mGp1_a1m1O1rZqx89ibwvkqhcooe6cv88J0r-XoU0WsnvOJbIO7Qc_DsyeMLaXc4Q8Hoauh2PpgNs-Ha-chlXopPTUZcyb1GLlm0FDZcIwhzNKJROda24azcXUTGbsMUod0UH1jDY17mRrHs1O9wp8XfUrP37qNZRmoHFox-Fkr2aFwKLl92YA1gfFVmgiPm6DbnoGGi0b7mXgQEM0Hul8q0iSCJ0SifEXGGtMt8GvmaAfuDKrME6_XuENzpvBtORH0W5FiSl0M7juKhq21ZV1FZBp0q-vAZAsGdBiQweFeHLc4MUmTTM0dMt6B31jLDrTEafm4zbYFrSIHAZkrn6VBRAf59pJTHVb7Ba15ca5BCEuaeM4QmjEIkxkl366LyfsRvWzNGIpkRI=w1033-h775-no)

My dad's valve body pattern
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/AgEohtrVF6TughX1zhNmuPcxmuHlm3cRbiuSqsc0oELvX6VLj9iTa3RNs4nLaOGHTea98nhKtjt8DCxaHLvNtS5FTObgwnxzRGubvgsxrsrL88urcwAQc8oj6B4XC3lHZZgkpWwnMP1c39FQRWqHBKREt0v3Ov7WxqFGrwUSzR4zi3SeiHX1RFlhvcFvn7onkDELv4GbeEyfRO0QyX9JVcx-HVzUClFw58fXHHZSny_054QFCQPzgP4RD2PaHEER3yCcijRpJ9cz9QRC0AETtjprMb3ZHhMrtpDITQrC2F_MzCNjN0XDLURBcnyGFT6p3b4kUTx40nF_HsfpjnWzKmi2pMsnrURqknvNe6H6YLMTw2Zl_-8N4uTdZvX7XseSRa_eZmHItYAYl9voWxmBSm7uD0gXRl-zv13ZCnso3zxs_cMLsAP4ugJajVIHYiQaxpOYcYpMYbnh4B7on7tEIA8GHV8ctme6AHv-GjwoMn3nuIHK6zCXhvqpR-X3tm9s5g-35QRM5dfvZCy48wNiBePxOwE1AP9LO_C2CPrHEJKHmXJa4oA48ALnUtxf4310qgLUVzpiOPs-PZDqdfc8gpSL0LIzHui90i8AZ6ngnSsbmBdyN652VrTVw5Fj11KL4gFmuwJIH56acnuqMfSbhmoG_z3qi7F-_bhifZWQTh96EFF5vzU6tjmqCYLz3NT8f76zK8QlsUc022O53KzT-YTf=w581-h775-no)

Mold made and cores installed
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/1Bgj0ygR1qvOTPyKDHgWBAInt3NdrOZdb2Q1dtHRcmO7EY9kkuWWAlWdMoZxJTOmQuzeCgPM6BYxYU_tmj-YTAJrBKJtu2PrzDnd4J8YhkLR5CRJ0B6V9UVqyYWn8xne4ZAR7bZ5SJHEM868Oi6A2Tmp2_3eYsyJV4u683UnRNBs6s3K_rk0UtQblhtcvH5iwkwEBYs5o3QCXuUH7H6VXhZvvLp0oCxh5Cs6g9FKAdZJPR-HFhlX87wmptJAl75PM58e1CEPSgFst9GXMb34rhnHhWES9VxcKZDxtITp_fAphvtJ3NkT3CIAfBZO-c49THPb99gMN2PJVCk6U95_S7g6mkIi1_RmQet3NYB3nkXMEwEyLHYvSosQCTTXg4pipp_SwbGLQjU39tY60LRKaPyTf_jXQsxG20xLRQFp88oo8Dkz3taSLfF7PWdZeYOTyCbOw2ki1PLS5sEFwwlgtPRPYtTMQsN8FhsBktoHX1CG4qieXllBBEPIg0qcVbx5796KU-ABB2xOqfXVWRXysYkh63-Pyjm6CKVIBtTUCIvPdC4pnpaPRxAGMvTT1ZIKWbL1cUDkZHjVPgK9hY4xPP6tae_PauxSKALewlu8VY7wYOiFrSUacvWWhf4mEHINdcrQrScy4x66WParbj4li0TyS1sx1q-99QK1ZEzGpjbPonFHMbuHhBX0Acu1ktxsti6ZHwZKpTvEEpU_XJjhzqhE=w1033-h775-no)

The valve body and the cap after being cleaned with the risers still attached
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/PcNy1DsCK1OxWrEJCDQd3uRcchQfkItP93hoRhZuZuCZIdnuV3N4JiGQ8S0FFIw1A528WyXuu3wmS_o-AbZtuOPSkS7BIghllhJPuzZxbfGzCS_KX-a0-ljco9Ey_SRuSn3tW62ppoL23bnvIfcvhz_VidMuvTWSu8Y8TAbDcuTcj5YIz_MqQALwww0AfTf3e4anzPk5s_zqZPpeIslnTs89I6eDq0D0ema0RCQEnCusvb7CFS6wgbiKk0tKzNC8EMZsBCocO47I3skGUdwjrPHCkXRksvR6Hzs_K_zDvvH7NadW_YXYEk_fYxA7NDa5qnXTBqLBypvxyH5GIWAsmJFIptKGkTlGcJ2f7nZww3qqs0w1LBHuK3_3AV8Phxxqnib9mulnm7ypjT2qKZEkhcAfxFr16_g-MUa5sn3S0_9whn8SyNNTM1-REjl64-HeovKvG0ILbTVyJiYr4sSZ-itbBzzxfjmMTFjZqcuuGk1hhxrk-GtwdrsaxuLfqMWYWAllklKcOXBMp7ssHl1rOAkblz5UemsAcCeUx15sh-YWiKf2sqTUIVSEboLuPQnZNVdpZ6U86JkOqjtRjlgacU7Y701MheCORU-feA0JuWVU_K4-lpnx6-20NZ5QBX65L6tD5966SRg2xvmx4Lp-SH8N2VndbGakyg1ML9ue4zMb_AP5IMTJqUN0ohTfynhHI19L4ZXNFKYqvjXAiiCNjdhP=w727-h969-no)

Note the first use of a chaplet for a WW&F casting. This is exactly what we wanted to see. The chaplet is centered on the location where a pipe fitting will be installed, so it will end up being drilled out- negating any concerns of complete fusion.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/kxs9UnTQhcM7IipnEPFChgzhejNZCgkgm1ATxHTnuinnIFWMJlgjb5MWfSeFkulRBQfpUk1BaNcCR6tUTK927kx0YjcGGNqzFwkqkxQzPf4iUuarceRKrWGntSodt96c3FEG40NtqgzBrq1kjv7rd6d8LDpLSffKx8Nf8XfgkeVQScIi05KZPeAVg7qyHmbBbYQj-3BUf3SF987wuM6I9uLa4zgnQlEhIgOYTBhMV--P6-urFg8-DZ-ssn5R34jC25XTHx6upfztYAdEq0WwiTbONMTsaCe9d5Tyvmg1ooDZ56qDnAH_tpl0TG-yaXQ6cuW3z_-ot5y_IYkWDHS9s00LlUNMlJAMtMhdSVm0E3UQIHZVR9BYkcvPEZ0FMqrgBOWmChZ-9aOAzb2t2Gz5LskMqjY4FgftnZddLE71GoSi-l-_r2jApkN_rAFLBsGqVXzwZDu7OXpH-FuQIA8GgwL1EBHTdtlcq9zhDGkbYCpygLzYy74oAURjTCzZfHtlxZGibt5mnwfRv1ou49cDTGcsf8c1UWzzzEd85Hy5dvkj6rzkO3go3OVPjbtKM_lOHt5cLM8Vw5ZKefls4exRtE1hHuoCEP00JP3Od8-QE--Q98gunYTu_d7Ew8sv2W4EhInmoGzEegeR4BqipsZhBSZ6isWacZXWrPRsHXaL3dGsUOQlcrO6njfSfj95K6NxpsujedUHrJfhXxp0cErdxn7G=w727-h969-no)

Both castings in a very raw state. They both still need to be ground before any machining happens.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Wwhy7_oEj1wHourZaWXGaffmo_FluSqirC5lsSlu6Zbmy17KC4iRiYpcpcnjb39DKSTVJcwwBTPdGq9By27ZX-nOqFUr9axArOIcUcR64JYSm2-6Own1Jm_sX116u8efJrKxq9HL1a9fhqAbMwM4MKVuikN8xYuE_RfRfj5KnvjXbHpSGpUo8qG4BeVe8jYIx0ygGOsczNYQ8SAY1cI61MZgaGitDsLF-HVbGGxdcNevuGHWD-R5yuDttArEd7sNGGdKn7LYwd2DTk7DgnyXiKv_RGtokt7qZSW4lU84KAch2OOw6y0CGEq2IXPndhswtv4JdVN_KCfGsET6bCqY93W_wAkMb24AiZTFVJGHcX4aekB76otpjl3S2FNepmmere54w9SR5XXs4ov_Sun12AbLQpG1ZVchNw_ecyTdT--k8lBwHe3ii7ta33ydeWDrzgMQQyA4I1dhaC6bjKUJiILI8-KafmoD72EEe6I_Rc8jxXa9oWjjTwItOC3ueMK9GqZ8lf9pEGRfFnMvLM-Fs9tNCPLzv3Fwzh-LlDdGPC9ehe5KBzv7ZympTA8QAktM7PESviBjoKjdOf9z3Mmp25ym08CGXAn8BqXjaPFYV-ajGqv1fpTuyJiu7rn59LK_Opex1ADHI-PJTlGDZdRtO28w-F09j6Ra9_UOYt3RCNbWb5C4g_WoxnM2S3sX7ckhEA_WPaZ6hLZlRoE0mMdOCaJu=w727-h969-no)

Showing just some of results of the printed cores.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/fYHoDWyp6-d5a9AaYfaW0FWHHlPxtUIbCpu80rKjQmFcuYr69c48qzLr-eywq9k6-0J2loWdJsMl1S_zuXD5wEjxPPmwPYpdVOsLeNKdjrY8KhPA22C16wWoGJqLeNFd8V2RCFVXnVOR2TUfSV_bRKSf_b9yV0nIU8nRBjEKbr2wt2MjA8eTXtkLhG2rcFYzWlrCLZ-G5LBJwIemxyPX6LgAM9T-qYlhupxXDAWroYHEwuUJKx65R_cNwMTfLX5lDCrfDmsHvNQ67j9pE9qC5luI_OktA8FgDdSPJ17LchcIHwO2UbaSzRbZZ1GPnmPjq35udUdABeZRWdVWOv2rYgbk1Rum9bpR2HVBXTHQl7BBhYyal-qm0JAb5CC1aV4jFfUfZiZJ_o6yZBlX29owMmIlqCFvjjwN5lgercVfQysn1Y4LpxorYrfEPwyB7NX7VKfOPZOdco1v5V16pk-ZGN6Mk71hTtTIVYj40Og9S1O6IL_Ymg_xTOz4O6d7Ku4XYo0IQusoMSFYPKgMBjJ_NRNUanEjTr3ImeDiCejslgsV6tc71wriCAwlPj6mqTQTbF0s82_qbMNIbdm-uLpte702zeq3ECLuKaojLK46cVKUqJHPG0rcAW9HGdAwfPy38oL3qJ4XVv0ZKmchiujbn46Y_a0RsYnSayO-j5hbndJnVWas_J0a9H2hnWkk7-AFBmkcNnVdKA-692NxeLBGE7ne=w1033-h775-no)

And the patterns which were just handed off to Wayne.
(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/yAua8lAdkqO7EzgMrQtr-3InC37_f-6z5YDSn405fGCHlUS5Dw580jv5RyfRw2N4QLCyIGFWQVEK5sz3dibAQNjjruQxl0E0SrixMB7Y8a7cD89viG-mGT6cESc1Im6i_hf1KJ1rytEY2cGkijuGCoF48Rb8elysYe4do7C9s28AZdMIZQB27armpM-OHcNTIjnD5bTjeAO2un9oZqpZHpPPJQzyMJ0K9J6hY-WtEtcCWilDAhIdFQVEFjkHYYzE8WNmO4odCx7YbvvurttX8QBKUUrTxry9xHLfsRwoUc8YtdhE4yhfOOOZ5bhzg8rOfGj4XORt1fwoicaFjYjv4GTktOxRh-riX453ip1Q34l4YLbQyGMEUzqvr4y24QriJm_LoABCLCYsFF8mfrtkfoz0sIBzLYimgwOWcBFcKhH1q-lwltFgXv9LlJX4PqeiY-iSkvP-tMKBa4TA-pj1c5JiQhpujar0huMOwMdDpDOv6_Aao71e1rkJcRfZ6WstpsIXt39zNvo2MRI76WE802b6Hmul0CyTtqoOVcT31Hn_2Zv-e1WhKI0LcAjw3vyx6K566jEbUipOwO_1CH63wLfjcGIgduD9-JvSl81AUTw7JaJe2WYYSojc975Es2Vco3eLFNa9mXT4QSXvmEvndBp_XVlO2zLJAKpTV7bnt6LSt0TVjId15SiPNg0EjxFPBVXZRRF4vJzm3gX3O0Ewa1SJ=w1292-h970-no)
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Steve Smith on June 27, 2019, 11:08:51 PM
Alan, with my iMac20 desktop, photos 2,3,4 and 5 didn't appear, nor did photos 7and 8. Am wondering whether anyone else had same problem. Anyway, thanks for a fascinating post!
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Dave Crow on June 27, 2019, 11:13:04 PM
Ditto, Steve. Same problem on my iPhone.

Dave Crow
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Alan Downey on June 27, 2019, 11:41:58 PM
Thanks for the heads up. It's fixed now.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Dave Crow on June 28, 2019, 08:42:25 AM
Excellent work, as always, by you and your dad!
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jeff Schumaker on June 28, 2019, 09:13:03 AM
It's amazing what can be done with 3D printing.

Jeff S.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Rick Knight on June 28, 2019, 02:57:37 PM
Truly amazing work.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bernie Perch on June 28, 2019, 05:31:46 PM
You guys are taking this to a mind bogglingly higher level.  I am in awe.

Bernie
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Steve Smith on June 28, 2019, 11:23:59 PM
All photos fine now. Marvelous work! Thank you, Alan
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: ALAIN DELASSUS on June 29, 2019, 08:13:44 AM
I'm wowed . You and your father are as much excellent to work wood as metal You are both artists and I'have learned quite a lot about casting through those pics and comments. I think it's a real chance for the WW&F to have guys like you.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Joe Fox on June 30, 2019, 06:09:46 AM
Very impressive. For those who may not know how air brakes or in this case vacuum brakes work, these controllers can be extremely tedious work. Job well done to everyone involved and I look forward to seeing the finished product.
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Paul Uhland on August 16, 2019, 06:24:04 PM
Astonishingly impressive!!
Cannot wait for more pics!
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Keith Taylor on January 13, 2020, 03:25:35 PM
Some photos showing brake controller patterns followed by some images showing what is involved with set up and machining.
Keith
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Keith Taylor on January 13, 2020, 03:26:32 PM
Second photo
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Keith Taylor on January 13, 2020, 03:27:11 PM
3rd photo
Title: Re: Eames Train Brakes - Official Work Thread
Post by: Keith Taylor on January 13, 2020, 03:41:36 PM
Center drilling the radial holes.