W.W.&F. Discussion Forum

WW&F Railway Museum Discussion => Work and Events => Topic started by: Dana Deering on May 01, 2015, 05:18:51 PM

Title: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Dana Deering on May 01, 2015, 05:18:51 PM
Hey Everyone,

     I'm planning to have another work day at the shingle mill on Saturday, May 9.  The owners have agreed to spot a dumpster there for us and I'm thinking we can finish the clean out that day and get plans formalized for removing the mill equipment.  It would be nice to have the equipment out and safely stored at Sheepscot or nearby by the end of June.  If you are interested and need directions PM me or call me.

Dana
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Pete "Cosmo" Barrington on May 02, 2015, 04:50:11 AM
And golly-gee-whiz, somebody, BRING A CAMERA! I keep hearing about this place, I'd like to see a few pics before it "dissappears."  ;)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Mike Fox on May 02, 2015, 10:59:29 PM
We documented it pretty well the first trip, but you are correct. Photos need to be taken after more cleaning but before the machinery is removed. It is like stepping back in time (just like we like it). Minus a couple of belts being removed, it is like it was the last day he used it. My hat is off to Dana, for discovering it, talking with the owner, and keeping track of it even after his passing. This is the type of thing we need. More historic variety, allowing us to possibly attract an even wider variety of tourists. And provide an interesting operating piece of history.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Wayne Laepple on May 02, 2015, 11:28:55 PM
At least as important as attracting more tourists, perhaps the shingle mill (and the sawmill) might bring in some volunteers who are interested in antique technology. Perhaps it would be worthwhile for a press release to be sent to the Portland newspaper or even a TV station when the machinery is being loaded and hauled to Sheepscot, emphasizing our desirer to someday put the machinery back into use as a historic demonstration.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Benjamin Campbell on May 03, 2015, 12:46:02 AM
Sounds like my kind of place. First time I've heard about it. Discussed in another thread? Any photos to share now?
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Mike Fox on May 03, 2015, 01:03:40 AM
Kept under wraps until recently Ben. The owners of the property were very adamant that no one be allowed on the property without Dana being present. The best way decided to do that was to keep it hush hush, until there was a good handle on things. We, as a museum, are very fortunate to be getting this, and all contents. Quite a variety of stuff in there. In fact, Fred found a potato sack from there today that was used to ship potatoes from Caribou. Lots of interesting stuff.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Paul Uhland on May 03, 2015, 05:21:54 AM
Shades of the East Broad Top! ;)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Benjamin Campbell on May 05, 2015, 12:36:22 PM
Sounds like a rare find. Take plenty of photos to document it. Is the shingle mill
wood framed or cast iron?
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Gordon Cook on May 05, 2015, 02:35:01 PM
At least as important as attracting more tourists, perhaps the shingle mill (and the sawmill) might bring in some volunteers who are interested in antique technology. Perhaps it would be worthwhile for a press release to be sent to the Portland newspaper or even a TV station when the machinery is being loaded and hauled to Sheepscot, emphasizing our desirer to someday put the machinery back into use as a historic demonstration.

Another thought: Is there any market for 'Made in Maine' shingles? It may be that other preservationists, builders, or individuals may be interested in buying shingles (or lumber) that's cut locally and is unique in size, shape, tree type, etc. With some imagination it could be another income source for the museum, as well as more exposure, as Wayne points out.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Ken Fleming on May 06, 2015, 01:10:41 AM
Here at Rough & Tumble in PA, we have a shingle mill and make cedar shingles Then we brand them with our logo and sell them for $1 ea.  Not a big money maker, but folks like to take them home.  They do last "forever".  A fellow I know has a big portable shingle mill.  He brings over Big Spring Farm (New Holland) ever Summer and we power it with steam.  A lot fun. Also, steam powered saw mill in operation.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Mike Fox on May 06, 2015, 01:27:06 AM
The shingle mill itself is cast Iron on a wooden frame. 6X6 or 8X8 timbers if I recall correctly.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: John Kokas on May 06, 2015, 11:32:14 PM
If the shingle mill could be setup and made to run, I have some cedar logs (not huge) that are in 4-6 foot sections that I would be willing to donate and bring up.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Dana Deering on May 07, 2015, 09:34:57 PM
Hi All,

     I hope everyone will understand that I have been keeping the shingle mill developments quiet while I worked to get a firm commitment from the Estate to donate the mill to the WW&F.  The mill is hidden in plain sight at a very busy intersection in southern Maine and I don't want too many people knowing about it so we can get it safely removed and taken to the Museum.  We're on pretty solid footing now and the Executor of the Estate has been a pleasure to work with and I have been careful to work according to their wishes.  Luckily he is very history/preservation minded and really wants the mill preserved and restored and he has placed his trust in me and I take that seriously.  At some point, once the machinery is safely on its way to the Museum I will write an article about the history of the mill and a little bit about my ten plus year effort to save it, and the friendship I developed with Ralph, the late owner.  It is a unique mill and I can't think of a better home for it than the WW&F.  I am so pleased to think of how this will expand the draw of the museum and expand our possible events for the future.  I have been thinking about getting the press involved but not until the day the machinery is loaded on the trailer!  Thanks for all of your support with this project.  It is "wicked cool!"  ;D

Dana
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: John Kokas on May 07, 2015, 10:54:37 PM
Just wondering out loud, but would setting up the shingle mill and sawmill be a project for our "acreage" at TOM.  Would definitely make the other end of line an attraction rather than just a turn-around point.

A Mini-Sherburne village a possibility?
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Philip Marshall on May 08, 2015, 01:16:53 AM
Thank you Dana for seeing this project through to the end in such a careful and deliberate manner! As a lover of old mills and machinery as well as trains, I'm really excited about the shingle mill and think it (plus the sawmill) will make a superb addition to the museum. I look forward to hearing more details about it in due time.

-Philip Marshall
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Brendan Barry on May 11, 2015, 05:23:32 AM
The shingle mill. You can see the drive belt coming down from the line shaft.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/IMG_0385.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/IMG_0390.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/IMG_0395.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/IMG_0401.jpg)

Looking down on the mill from line shaft.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0346_1.jpg)

The belt under tension drives the shingle mill and the loose belt on the right goes to the engine to drive the line shaft.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0354_1.jpg)

Line shaft pulley for the mill.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0332.jpg)

Line shaft pulley for the engine is in the foreground. Next pulley drives the edger and there is a smaller pulley behind it for the saw dust blower. Pulley farthest away drives the cut off saw.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0336_1.jpg)

This is the cut off saw. Logs came in on wooden rollers that we saved on the frame going through the door on the right. The log would be pushed up to the post on the left and a bolt sawed off for the shingle mill. The cut off saw just hangs and pivots off the line shaft. The wood box to the left behind the ladder is the edger used to make the shingles square.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0356_1.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0357.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0360_1.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0432.jpg)

Cut off saw pivot on the line shaft.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0434_1.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0330_1.jpg)

The engine resides in a steel lined room in the back corner of the building.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0427_1.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0426.jpg)

Engine pto and drive belt pulley sticks through a hole in the engine room wall.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0422_1.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0429.jpg)

General inside pictures. Remember about 12 pickup loads of stuff have come out of here and half a 20 yard dumpster filled up. My first visit was on the second clean out trip and you couldn't see the floor. The black box is a WWII vintage hobart generator that was buried in the building.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0416_1.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0418_1.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0420_1.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0421.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0430_1.jpg)

Building pictures the grey color blocks out the identifiable location details in the background.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0398_1.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0393.jpg)

Sawdust conveyor.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0384_1.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0382_1.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0378.jpg)

Pipe sticking out over the double doors is the engine exhaust.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0375_1.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0373_1.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0368_1.jpg)

Open door in the side of the building is where logs fed into the building to the chop saw.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0363.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/DSC_0365_1.jpg)

Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Philip Marshall on May 11, 2015, 06:15:56 AM
Wow, what a place! Thank you for posting these pictures, Brendan -- and thank you also for taking the trouble to conceal the location!

I saw a shingle mill demonstration once at an antique engine show in New York State about 15 years ago. It was really impressive to watch (and more than a little frightening with that big circular saw blade spinning just inches from the operator's fingers), but the machine by itself had no historical context. I really hope we can recreate some of the atmosphere of the original mill building at the museum.

-Philip Marshall.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Terry Harper on May 11, 2015, 10:48:39 AM
What a great project and addition to the WW&F!

I can see this rig setup in a small clearing with a nice pile of cedar logs and that wonderful aroma only a shingle mill can have.
That well maintained Continental Red Seal is a treasure in itself.

Most fantastic!

Best regards,

Terry
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Paul Uhland on May 11, 2015, 05:28:32 PM
Tnx for the thorough pic coverage.
It's obvious this mill was run by the CIA, hence the grayed-out surroundings!    ;D

Seriously, looks like a lot of grunt work went into just uncovering  salvageable building contents.
The building is beyond rehab, would be a mega-hassle to move, I'm sure.

Relocating, storing the mill, motor, corrugated steel sheets back to Sheepscot will be interesting.
How many miles are involved?

Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Philip Marshall on May 12, 2015, 01:08:08 AM
Here's a nice video of a similar mill in action, I believe in Liberty, Maine. (Watch those fingers!)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpd3ZOoI7kk (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gpd3ZOoI7kk)

-Philip Marshall
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Mike Fox on May 12, 2015, 01:12:52 AM
Paul, about 55 road miles, most good highway driving though. A touch over an hour.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Glenn Christensen on May 12, 2015, 02:21:31 AM
Great video Phillip! 


Thanks,
Glenn
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Greg Klein on May 12, 2015, 01:29:16 PM
Fascinating!  I get the same feeling as standing on the edge of a tall building whenever he reaches toward the blade to grab the cut shingle.  I could zone out and watch that for hours!
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Wayne Laepple on May 12, 2015, 10:58:12 PM
Okay, no one else has asked and I'm dying to know. Where is all this good stuff going to be stored until it gets set up in some yet-to-be determined location?
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Dave Buczkowski on May 13, 2015, 03:08:18 AM
Bay 2 when No. 9's cab moves out.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Mike Fox on May 13, 2015, 12:58:19 PM
I would hate to see some of the best work space we have to be used as storage. I would like to see it stored in the south east corner of the car barn, once weather proof.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: James Patten on May 13, 2015, 01:58:19 PM
I think the large items are being stored off site until we're ready for them.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Dave Buczkowski on May 13, 2015, 04:44:35 PM
James;
Not offsite where I was originally told they would be stored. That offer was withdrawn.
Dave
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Dana Deering on May 15, 2015, 06:38:49 PM
Excellent photos, Brendan.  Thank you for doing your best to conceal clues about the location.  This gives the rest of the volunteers a chance to see what a unique gift we've been entrusted with.  At this point I am on pins and needles trying not to worry too much about the mill being disturbed or damaged before we get it moved.  We had a couple of unauthorized "visitors" show up on the 9th and I had one ask a lot of questions and I gave him no real answers but I'm afraid the word might start to leak out.

Anyway, there was a lot of just plain trash in that little building and I can't say thank you enough to the guys who have helped with the clean up so far.  We're at the point now where we can plan and carry put the moving of the machinery and the sooner the better.  Once we get it to Sheepscot it has to be kept protected under cover.  It is in too good a shape to allow it to deteriorate.

Once the machinery has been moved and restoration work is underway we'll need to start planning its new home.   This will be a real positive addition to the Museum and a great tribute to the former owner (who was also an infantryman in the Second World War and who was part of the first of the American forces to reach and liberate the Dachau (sp?) concentration camp.  He told me about that experience.  Wow.).

I'm glad that the photos were posted so you can a sense of the mill.  Now on to the next phase,

Dana
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: John Kokas on May 15, 2015, 10:44:28 PM
Dana,

Did our "benefactor" state which unit he was with in WWII?  My uncle was at Dachau also, I wonder if they might have met.  As a retired military member myself, I would love the opportunity to talk with him and maybe swap some war stories.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Mike the Choochoo Nix on May 16, 2015, 12:51:07 AM
I think the doors on the old mill, while worn have a lot of character.  If they could be saved they might be reused if a new shelter was built for the mill, not a replica but something smaller that would have the feel of the old mill.
Mike Nix
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Mike Fox on May 16, 2015, 12:53:43 AM
Mike, if time permits, I have thoughts of the flooring too, if not too far gone or labor intensive to get out.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Carl G. Soderstrom on May 16, 2015, 04:03:15 AM
You can store the mill in my barn.
There are 2 draw backs on your end -
1- it is 1800 miles
2- you would be going back with more than you came with. ;D
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Dana Deering on June 02, 2015, 09:50:36 AM
Hi All,

     I think we'll need to get going on moving the equipment, the sooner the better. 

Dana
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Fred Morse on June 02, 2015, 11:52:23 AM
Have they got a FOR Sale sign on the property now?
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Dana Deering on June 22, 2015, 01:13:54 PM
Hi All,

     There will be a work day at the Shingle Mill on Saturday, June 27.  We will start the removal of the mill machinery and we may also have a chance to get items from the other buildings.  I need to coordinate with the executor of the estate to see if he will be available to let us into the other buildings.  If not, we'll concentrate on the machinery.  Hope to see you on Saturday.

Dana
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Mike Fox on June 22, 2015, 02:19:55 PM
I'll be early Dana. 6:30 ish...
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Dave Buczkowski on June 22, 2015, 04:24:07 PM
Mike;
If you're that early I presume you'll get coffee for everyone. I like mine XL, no sugar with extra cream. Bill has decaf, just cream. I'll wander by about 8:30 with the Late Riser's Club.
Dave
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Dana Deering on June 22, 2015, 06:48:54 PM
I'll plan to be there with the keys, Mike.  Easy on the coffee, restrooms are some distance away!
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Mike Fox on June 22, 2015, 07:38:28 PM
Dave, your coffee will be down the road a piece. They will keep it hot for you. Restrooms are in the same building.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Bill Reidy on June 22, 2015, 09:44:16 PM
...Bill has decaf, just cream...

1.  It's decaf with skim.

2.  Never use my name.

HWMNBN
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Dave Buczkowski on June 23, 2015, 03:05:08 AM
Thanks Mike. Do they have doughnuts too? As to the other guy - what makes you think I meant you?
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Mike Fox on June 27, 2015, 10:54:41 PM
The Shingle Mill is now in Sheepscot. It was a very good day. Things went better than expected, and all pieces were separated and about ready for removal by the time the Kubota showed up. There are pictures out there, hoping they get posted here as well, showing the removal process.
Now the motors can be checked over and maybe started. Some of the timbers need to be replaced due to rot.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Stephen Piwowarski on June 28, 2015, 12:03:22 AM
Sorry I could not be there to help! Sounds like a great many things of interest are now at Sheepscot. I had something to do at noon here in Rutland, which occupied today. I'll be back tomorrow through Wednesday to continue work on WSH and other projects!

Take care,
Steve
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Brendan Barry on June 28, 2015, 02:34:22 AM
Mill parts at the railroad.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/IMG_0710.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/IMG_0712.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/IMG_0714.jpg)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Dana Deering on June 28, 2015, 01:45:51 PM
What a great day!  After more than a decade of working to get that mill donated to the museum it is so gratifying and exciting to see the photos of the machinery safe at the mill's new home!  I can't say enough thank yous to the crews who spent so many days in the dust, mouse droppings, and mummified cats and possums to make this happen.  Moving the machinery went smoother than I imagined and Mike and I were able to have most pieces ready to move before the trailer arrived.  The engine moved far easier than either of us thought it would.  I took a lot of photos with my old film camera (in black and white) so I have to wait to get them developed before we can see them so I am hoping those who had their cell phones can post more pictures of the move here on the forum.

Now that the machinery is at Sheepscot I'll write up a history of the mill for the newsletter.  The Temm family had an interesting mill and agricultural enterprise and we have artifacts from both aspects of the their business.  We should be able to create a great "living exhibit" of a typical early 20th century Maine  rural enterprise.

I think it will require one more trip to the mill to pick up the few items that are left, odds and ends mostly, including a Portland Stove Company cookstove and a player piano!

Many, many thanks to all who have supported this project so far.  Now on to phase 2!

Dana
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Mike Fox on June 28, 2015, 03:47:06 PM
Yes Dana. That was a great pursuit by you to keep tabs of the mill for so long. This thing is in such great shape, I am hoping for some rainy Saturdays to get a chance to work on it.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Ira Schreiber on June 28, 2015, 06:19:04 PM
What a great find and rescue. Kudos to ALL who helped in the project.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Kevin Kierstead on June 29, 2015, 12:03:43 AM
What year is the red seal engine?
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Brendan Barry on June 29, 2015, 02:04:42 AM
Similar mills working.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ytn8brKj1So

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asWIPGlHN9k

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ei4AZgDGFqM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KzdrY4w8PQc
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: John Kokas on June 29, 2015, 12:54:54 PM
Is the plan to create a combination sawmill / shingle mill somewhere on the railroad as an "industrial" customer?  It would really be a nice additional attraction as well as expand the historic base of the museum.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Mike Fox on June 30, 2015, 12:57:22 AM
John,

Plans are for two separate buildings. Since the shingle mill is in such great condition, I would assume that one built first so we can have an up and running display when we want it, and maybe make some shingles for a project.

Kevin,

I am not sure any of us have taken the time to look it up yet. I'm guessing in the 60's
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Ira Schreiber on June 30, 2015, 01:41:36 AM
IMHO, the flat head Red Seal puts it pre WW2 and the late 1950's. By the 1960's almost everyone had gone to OHV engines.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Dana Deering on July 01, 2015, 02:46:11 PM
I am planning to come to Sheepscot 7/11 - 12 and I may be firing at least one day but I also want to work on the mill machinery.  I am also going to contact David F. to see if I can get him to let me into the other building so I can bring all of that oil with me and I will also bring the big saw blade.

I have also been sketching some ideas for the new mill building.  I'm not sure we need to exactly replicate the existing mill building because that was an existing building that was moved across the road after the first Temm Mill burned in 1938.  It wasn't built for the mill.  By the way, the Temm's first shingle mill (the one that burned) was purchased from my great-great grandfather sometime after 1909.  I'm trying to pin down the date but no luck so far.  When Ralph Temm told me that during one of our visits I knew it was fate that I would somehow save his mill.

Dana
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Stewart "Start" Rhine on July 01, 2015, 05:39:34 PM
Hi Dana,

If there's room in your truck, we need a roll of tar paper to cover the sides of the section house.  I think there were some rolls in that other building. 

Thanks, see you on the 11th.

Stewart
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Mike Fox on July 01, 2015, 11:22:57 PM
Dana, I kind of liked the set up of that building. Reason being, the step up area would make a great viewing area while the machinery is running. Hoping to catch up with you on the 11th.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Bill Sample on July 04, 2015, 01:50:26 AM
Just after reading about this latest successful project I saw that Mike had already mentioned what I was thinking - providing a safe viewing area for visitors.
And thanks to Dana for sharing another historic family connection!
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Mike Fox on July 04, 2015, 10:22:04 PM
Took today off from the museum and went to an historic Mill site close to me. I had never been before. It is an old water powered mill (currently operated by the belt drive of a John Deere tractor) that also made barrels. The barrel making equipment was very interesting. The highlight was the shingle mill. Identical to ours, and the edger was also the same. Here is a video of it in operation.
https://youtu.be/e6tENbJFbpQ (https://youtu.be/e6tENbJFbpQ)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Stephen Piwowarski on July 04, 2015, 10:33:04 PM
That's funny,
You and I are living parallel lives Mike. Annie and I travelled down to New York to see my folks. We visited Hanford Mills in East Meredith, NY. They have a great mill setup with a grist mill, woodworking shop, sawmill, shingle mill, and other machinery all belt driven from a 1926 Fitz overshot waterwheel, a steam engine, and a tub wheel water turbine. Their shingle mill is newer than ours as it has a cast iron frame and a few other differences. It's an amazing place. I'll post some photos here soon.

Someone mentioned to me that it would be good to get in touch with SPOOM- the Society for the preservation of Old Mills. www.spoom.org (http://www.spoom.org)
Steve
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Dylan Lambert on July 06, 2015, 12:55:59 PM
Dana, I'm a bit curious as to what type of Continental that the stationary engine is... I only ask because we found a similar motor (unused, got to love that military surplus!) at my late Grandfather's house.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Dana Deering on July 06, 2015, 06:34:11 PM
Mike,
   
     I went to Scribner's Mill a few times and took a lot of videos of the shingle mill and showed them to Ralph to try and inspire him to have his mill preserved.  It was then that he told me that his mill was also "on wood" and that he thought it had been built in Harrison, which would mean the Ricker Machine Co, but he never was sure.  There would also be a two foot connection there because Ernest Ward, a former brakeman for the B&SR owned the Ricker Machine Co at the end of its operation (it burned).

Bill,

     A integral part of the new mill building would be a protected viewing area with interpretive signs explaining the history of the mill and the shingle making process so folks would understand what they are seeing.

Dylan,

     Not sure I have a lot of info yet on the engine.  I am assuming it replaced the one that burned in the 1938 fire and that it is pre WWII, but I am not sure.  We'll know more once we look up serial numbers, etc.  It is a six cylinder "Red Star".

Stewart,

     I may not be up until Sunday the 12th.  There's a birthday party for my granddaughter on the 11th so my plans have to change slightly.  I still plan to meet with David to get some more of the stuff, oil, tarpaper, etc.

Dana
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Dana Deering on July 07, 2015, 09:51:17 AM
Mike,

     I've taken several videos of the shingle mill at Scribner's and I showed them to Ralph a few years ago.  That's when he started giving me more details about his mill.  He thought it was made in Harrison.  The only company that made sawmill equipment there was Ricker Machine Co.  There's even a two footer connection with Ricker because the last owner of Ricker Machine was former B&SR brakeman Ernest Ward.  The whole outfit burned to the ground about a year after he bought it.  By the way, I will be coming up on Sunday 7/12.  I was going to come on Saturday and stay the weekend but my grand daughter's birthday party is on Saturday.

Bill,

     My idea for the new mill building is to have a safe viewing area for visitors with interpretive signs that will provide a history of the mill and an explanation of the shingle making process.

Dylan,

     I don't know that much about the Red Star engine that came out of the mill.  If it is the same engine that replaced the one that burned then I'd say it's pre WWII.  Once we get a chance to look up the serial number we'll have more info on it.

Dana
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Benjamin Campbell on July 07, 2015, 12:19:29 PM
Excellent job everyone on the save and move! I was curious what the piece is
which can be seen under a work bench in the mill photos and then on the trailer?
It appears to be a shaft and at least one pulley mounted in ornate cast iron
brackets. Ceiling mount jack shaft for a swing saw -  something else?

I have a Ricker catalogue dated 1890. There is no mention of them manufacturing
shingle mills - not to say that they didn’t in latter years.

Ricker or not I would be surprised if there is not a manufacturer’s name
stenciled under the dust and grime. Ricker used both stencils and cast iron
name plates to identify their machines. I have a 24 inch Ricker planer which I
would be happy to donate to the museum.


The Maine State Museum has a wonderful recreation of a typical Maine water
powered wood working mill. Well worth the visit!

The Maine Maritime Museum in Bath has in impressive collection of antique
wood working machinery as does the Windsor Historical society who’s
collection is on display at the Windsor fairgrounds.

Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Dale Reynolds on July 07, 2015, 03:28:35 PM
Benjamin, do you know where the Maine state museum is? will be coming up from South Carolina in August. Dale 
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Mike Fox on July 07, 2015, 03:38:24 PM
Maine State museun is in Augusta near the capitol building.  Worth the trip.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Philip Marshall on July 07, 2015, 07:15:35 PM
Someone mentioned to me that it would be good to get in touch with SPOOM- the Society for the preservation of Old Mills. www.spoom.org (http://www.spoom.org) I'll post some photos here soon.
Steve

Hi Steve,

I will second the suggestion about SPOOM. My father was a member of SPOOM years ago and I remember tagging along with him on a couple of bus tours of water-powered mills in New England sponsored by the group's North East Chapter. (I even remember on one tour visiting what's now the Montague Book Mill in Montague, MA when it was still a water-powered machine shop and not a used book store.) They're a great group with a wealth of practical knowledge to offer, however their membership at that time (this was in the 1980s) seemed to be skewed very much toward the geriatric end of the age distribution, so I'm actually pleasantly surprised to see they have an operating website.

Philip
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Jason M Lamontagne on July 07, 2015, 09:52:48 PM
One of our earliest and long time members, supporter and volunteer was a founder of spoom, I believe.  Don Perham.  Interesting how things come around.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Stephen Piwowarski on July 07, 2015, 10:10:55 PM
As promised, a some photos of the mill from this past weekend. I highly recommend  visit if you are passing through New York on I-88 or detouring off of I-90.
An overview of the Mill from the entrance
(http://wwfry.org/pics/for_forum/nymill01.JPG)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Stephen Piwowarski on July 07, 2015, 10:31:06 PM
The blacksmith's forge.
(http://wwfry.org/pics/for_forum/nymill03.JPG)

(http://wwfry.org/pics/for_forum/nymill02.JPG)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Stephen Piwowarski on July 07, 2015, 10:34:46 PM
A floating table ripsaw in the foreground used to edge lumber coming off the mill in the foreground with the mill in the background.
(http://wwfry.org/pics/for_forum/nymill07.JPG)

The mill manager preparing to demonstrate the wood lathe. The machine in the foreground is for cutting the handles into wooden boxes
(http://wwfry.org/pics/for_forum/nymill06.JPG)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Stephen Piwowarski on July 07, 2015, 10:36:37 PM
The grist mill in action
(http://wwfry.org/pics/for_forum/nymill04.JPG)

One of the sources of power- a tub wheel turbine
(http://wwfry.org/pics/for_forum/nymill05.JPG)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill Work Day
Post by: Stephen Piwowarski on July 07, 2015, 10:39:21 PM
The stash of extra belting and wheels in the mill basement
(http://wwfry.org/pics/for_forum/nymill09.JPG)

The horizontal steam engine in action
(http://wwfry.org/pics/for_forum/nymill08.JPG)

Sorry for the poor pictures... nothing could really capture the essence of this place besides a visit.

Take care,
Steve
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Dana Deering on July 13, 2015, 04:29:02 PM
When I was at Sheepscot on 7/12 I was very pleased to see that the shingle mill and edger are now undercover.  I tarped the cutoff saw and the pieces of the sawdust carrier and we need to get those under cover as well.  I was also thinking that before the parts get scattered to the four winds that we should have an organized plan for how we are going to proceed with getting the machinery running again and perhaps prioritize the work so we can proceed in an orderly and sensible fashion.  I know that there has been some talk about rigging up the mill to make shingles at the Picnic and that's great and I also think we should work thoughtfully to clean the mill and make any repairs that are needed, especially to the woodwork, and to look for any manufacturers marks that may still be there somewhere, before we get too far ahead of ourselves.  The edger is in sore need of having its wooden frame and box replaced, too.  Then there is the engine.  I think if we want to have some sort of demonstration at the picnic then we should work on the mill and edger (maybe have a small crew work on each, so long as it doesn't take people away from other museum priorities) and maybe work on the mill first.  I am open to suggestions but I think we should have some sort of organized effort so we don't get people working on the pieces haphazardly.  Thoughts?

And on another note, we seem to be acquiring lots of belt driven woodworking/milling machinery and I don't want to miss the opportunity to get another (there's no such thing as too many line shafts!).  So, regarding the Ricker 24 " planer, can we get some details?  Condition? Location? etc.?  I think it would make a great addition to the future mill complex.

The enthusiasm about the whole larger mill/lumbering working exhibit has been great!  All we need now is the time to do everything while keeping the railroad running!
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Wayne Laepple on July 13, 2015, 05:26:31 PM
I have offered the suggestion several times that we acquire a 20-foot or even 40-foot cargo container as dry, secure storage for equipment and machinery that we do not at this time have a place for. Seems to me that would be the perfect place to store the shingle mill and its components until we are actually ready to set them up in the yet-to-be built mill complex. If it was located up in the northwest corner of the parking lot it would be accessible, yet (mostly) out of sight. Right now, the shingle mill equipment is stored in the shop, along with several other non-functional pieces of machinery, taking up space that is needed for railroad-related projects.

A thought. Some publicity outside our Facebook page, perhaps in the newspapers, might bring some folks particularly interested in antique machinery who would be willing to focus their energies in that direction.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bernie Perch on July 13, 2015, 05:39:34 PM
Since so much of this flat belt machinery is showing up, I wonder if anyone knows where I can purchase about 6 feet of 2 1/2" X 1/4" of belt for my ancient metal lathe?

Bernie
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Ira Schreiber on July 13, 2015, 07:41:24 PM
Wayne brings up a very good point. The container is the ideal storage building and can be out of sight, as mentioned.
Our shop is much too valuable to be used as a catch all.

It we keep it up we may qualify for the TV reality show, "Hoarders".

Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: John McNamara on July 13, 2015, 08:03:54 PM
Maybe one with lift rings. When the time comes, we ship it on a flat car.
-John
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on July 13, 2015, 10:23:05 PM
Dana,

I am the culprit when it comes to the idea of making a shingle or two during the picnic. The edger needs more worm than the rest, and I think that it can not be made ready easily in the time we have.
My idea is getting the motor running first. If it runs, hook it to the mill only. This is just for show, just for a handful of shingles, with the mill run at specific times.

So getting the motor running should be first, then cleaning up the mill itself.

I looked it over Saturday rather closely, and could not find a name anywhere. I do have an email out to see how old the motor is, based on the serial number. I will post my findings here.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on July 13, 2015, 10:48:12 PM
From Jerry at Montes Equipment Co. in Buffalo Grove, IL.

Your F226 serial # 29280 was manufactured by Continental on September 11, 1946,  and left the factory for a company named "Roberts" on September 16, 1946.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Keith Taylor on July 14, 2015, 12:14:56 AM
Since so much of this flat belt machinery is showing up, I wonder if anyone knows where I can purchase about 6 feet of 2 1/2" X 1/4" of belt for my ancient metal lathe?

Bernie
Bernie....Page Belting Co. in New Hampshire. They will not only sell you the belting, but they will lace the belt if you give them the dimensions of the belt.
http://www.pagebelting.com/
I highly recommend them and I have used them with great satisfaction.
Keith
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Paul Uhland on July 14, 2015, 01:14:29 AM
Wayne...a 40 or 52-foot shipping container or two would probably be ideal for WW&F storage, can be moved on a flatbed trailer.
NMSL&RHS gradually assembled a half-dozen used ones  in Abq, have worked out well as shops, tool and storage centers on their compact 2926 worksite.
 
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: James Patten on July 14, 2015, 01:22:48 AM
It should be noted that at Friday's board meeting, a donation was revealed by one of our members to purchase the switch parts for a siding which will serve the shingle mill (and probably sawmill) at Top of the Mountain. 
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Pete "Cosmo" Barrington on July 14, 2015, 02:22:14 AM
Wow! TOM sounds like it's going to grow into quite an interesting place! So, does this mean that TOM will wind up being the new location for "Sheepscott Mills"?
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on July 14, 2015, 03:25:54 AM
Maybe the next rolling stock project should be a set of Eustis-style disconnect log bunks. :)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Dana Deering on July 14, 2015, 10:14:58 AM
Mike,

     I think that's the start of a good plan.  I'm hoping it won't take much to get the motor running as it seems to be in really good shape.  Then perhaps we could work on the mill and replace the legs that are rotted on the bottom;   and I also noticed some small springs that might need to be replaced.  Then I think it could be cleaned and oiled and would be ready to saw shingles.  Next we could work on the edger.  The iron is fine, the wood needs to be replaced.

Dana
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on July 14, 2015, 11:23:07 AM
I was thinking of a name more like Clarks Mill. Sheepscot Mill may be confused with the former location.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on July 14, 2015, 11:33:56 AM
I would suggest that we name the mill after the family who kept it for so many years but re-establish the station stop as Alna in order to be historically correct.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Fred Morse on July 14, 2015, 11:59:51 AM
Maybe we should call the Top of the mountain Yesteryear Station, because of all the old stuff where going to have there.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on July 14, 2015, 12:10:07 PM
The problem I see with calling it Alna (beyond the simple issue of confusion with AC) is that the historical Alna station at MP 7.0 lasted just a couple of years and was apparently gone by 1897 or so, which is way before the period we're portraying. The location is much better known as TOM, which is a more colorful and descriptive epithet to begin with. My vote would be just to continue using the name TOM.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Stewart "Start" Rhine on July 14, 2015, 01:21:05 PM
Dana has collected photos and information on the family who had the mill.  He plans to have a display at the mill site giving credit to them for their years of operating the mill and preserving it for future generations.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Fred Morse on July 14, 2015, 02:38:05 PM
Even if only a small part of the siding is built at first, it will be a good place to put a couple of cars on so as not to interfere with the run around track as we build the mainline track down the mountain.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Dana Deering on July 14, 2015, 04:27:47 PM
Hi All,

     I would like to see the shingle mill part of the complex named "R. E. Temm Shingle Mill" and I want to have a display inside the building, in a safe area for public viewing, with photos of the family and a history of the mill.  Although Ralph's father, Clifford started the shingle business, I worked with Ralph for over ten years to make this happen and I'd like to see his name on it.  I also want to make sure that his sister, Vera, is included in the display because she used to work in the mill bundling the shingles.
     I still sometimes have a hard time believing that this is really starting to happen.  It was a long time getting to this point.  What a great addition this is going to be for the museum.
     Now, what about that Ricker planer?

Dana
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on July 14, 2015, 06:24:12 PM
Yes, the shingle mill should bear his name, or the name he operated under. As should the saw mill, if we know such history of it.

TOM siding should remain named as such. So I will add an S to my previous suggestion. Clarks Mills. For the siding to the mills. Or Winters Mills...
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Ira Schreiber on July 14, 2015, 11:18:03 PM
Mr. Clark should have to endow the name for his site.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Pete "Cosmo" Barrington on July 14, 2015, 11:28:54 PM
I like the sound of "Clark's Mills," reminiscent of "Clark's Corner" or "Grover's Mills."
Certainly signage and other official documentation regarding the shingle mill specifically should include: "R. E. Temm Shingle Mill"
But I can see that shortened unofficially to "Temm's Mill."
It will be interesting to observe the changing vernacular of members and frequenters to see how "Temm's" and "TOM" might combine... will we be taking trains to "Temm" or recieve carlooads of freight from "TOM's Mill"?
Only the future will tell.  ;)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Ira Schreiber on July 14, 2015, 11:45:23 PM
TOM could become Temm's On the Mountain.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on July 15, 2015, 01:41:16 AM
Well I see two mills on one track in our future. The mills retaining their name, the siding having a name of it's own. Say for instance, we had a car of logs for the shingle mill. It would go to Clark's Mills siding, Temms Mill. Logs for the sawmill, Clark's siding, _______ Lumber.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: John McNamara on July 15, 2015, 02:26:58 AM
Morse Lumber
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Pete "Cosmo" Barrington on July 15, 2015, 02:44:03 AM
Morse Lumber

LIKE BUTTON! :D
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on July 15, 2015, 02:46:12 AM
John, is that "morse" code for a Fred project?  ;D
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Wayne Laepple on July 15, 2015, 03:52:07 PM
I suppose this means that the original plan of Top of the Mountain eventually reverting to its original WW&F state with a single stub end siding in the middle of the woods is no longer operative.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Fred Morse on July 15, 2015, 07:27:54 PM
I think it was all fields years ago. Tom Albee's father said when he was young he could see the train as it came over the TOM.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Dwight Winkley on July 15, 2015, 08:46:48 PM
Wayne, I believe the mill siding will be built on the west side of the mainline.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on July 16, 2015, 11:58:56 AM
Dwight is correct. We are looking at the West side. But to get track there where we need it will take some doing. The ideal setting will be get the track far enough away from the main to be able to put both mills between the siding and main, so visitors and viewers do not cross tracks to get into the mills.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Stewart "Start" Rhine on July 18, 2015, 11:42:01 PM
Today, the main line shaft was suspended from the rafters in the shop extension.  This got the shaft and pulleys off the floor where they were stored next to coach 3.   (Floor storage made it unsafe to walk through the west side of the shop).  The line shaft looks good up at about the height where it was in the mill.  It's fastened with heavy chains so it can be let down when it's time to set up the shingle mill. 

The Continental engine (mill power plant) got some attention today.  Mike Fox temporarily connected a battery and test cranked the engine which turned freely.  More checking of the power unit revealed crud in the fuel tank.  The tank was removed for cleaning and testing.   
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Benjamin Campbell on July 19, 2015, 12:18:37 AM
Great work everyone! Dana - here is a link to my Ricker planer. http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id=16541  It came out of an auction in the Garner ME area and
is rumored to have been deaccessioned from the Maine State Museum along with much other machinery which was included in the auction. I've been interested in this stuff for years
and have piles of pulleys - belts etc which I can provide as needed.   
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on July 19, 2015, 01:01:07 AM
Looks like we have some carefull cleaning to do. Looks like your planer has the same style frame as the shingle mill
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: James Patten on July 19, 2015, 01:25:35 AM
The steel tank when thumped sounds like a cheap plastic drum.  Lots of crud in it.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Carl G. Soderstrom on July 19, 2015, 01:57:16 AM
I hear tell cola and a handful of bolt nuts does wonders.
Keep us informed - I have a Oliver 70 tank that needs the same thing.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Benjamin Campbell on July 19, 2015, 06:40:34 PM
Here are links to two other wood frame shingle mills preserved in Maine.
I believe there is a third at the Windsor Fair Grounds.

http://www.maineforestandloggingmuseum.org/1920s-mill-yard

http://www.mainememory.net/artifact/15737
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on July 20, 2015, 12:03:52 AM
Stockholm, Harrison and Sheepscot shingle mills are the same. Maine Forestry Museum is also very similar. I would like to see the Ricker name painted on the side of ours. Time to do a little more cleaning of the framework, and hope the oil has not erased the name.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Benjamin Campbell on July 20, 2015, 12:32:43 AM
The example at the Maine Forest and Logging Museum has a
cast iron builder’s plate which although unreadable - does
not appear to be by Ricker. I can find no evidence
that Ricker made shingle mills but I think that there were some
more obscure Maine manufacturers which did.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Dana Deering on July 20, 2015, 10:12:45 PM
     That is a nice planer, Benjamin.  Good save.  According to a book I picked up at the Maine State Museum many years ago, a couple of the companies that made shingle mills in Maine were Hinckley & Egery of Bangor; and J.G. Johnson of Augusta.
     Ralph seemed to think that his mill was made in Harrison, Maine.  The wood frame sure looks like the same style and paint color as your planer. I know that Ricker didn't seem to advertise shingle mills but maybe they dabbled in them for a short while.  The shingle mill at Scribner's in Harrison has a similar look to it although it looks a bit more "used". What we would need to find is the stenciling, if it still exists.  The SPOOM website had a good document about cleaning wood framed machinery and it basically recommends hot soapy water and lots of cloths.  I was thinking of using Dawn detergent since it cuts oil and grease about as well as any soap I've used.
     We need to proceed with the cleaning and repair carefully so we don't inadvertently remove the evidence of the manufacturer. 
     Interesting info on the engine.  I had my doubts when they told me they had it running "a couple of years ago".  I'm glad to hear that the water was drained out of it.  I hope to find some time soon to get back up there and start working on the mill and get it fixed up so we can turn our attention to the edger.

Dana
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Carl G. Soderstrom on July 21, 2015, 04:40:42 AM
You might try "Simple Green" good grease & soot cutter and easy on the environment.
As with anything try it on an inconspicuous spot first. 
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on July 21, 2015, 09:00:28 AM
One imagines that Ricker machinery would have been shipped from Harrison on the B&SR, no? Does anyone know when the firm ceased production?
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on July 21, 2015, 08:06:07 PM
Trying on a leg would be a safe place to start cleaning.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Dana Deering on July 22, 2015, 03:53:55 PM
T H Ricker was purchased by Ernest Ward, a former B&SR brakeman, in 1940.  He and his wife ran the business as the Ricker Machine Co. and they produced a number of mills in the next two years but then the whole works was destroyed by fire.  All the machinery and patterns were lost so Ward liquidated what was left of the business.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Benjamin Campbell on July 25, 2015, 12:24:56 PM
Here is another for sale on Maine Craigslist. Looks similar but
difficult to tell given the condition. http://maine.craigslist.org/atq/5108850901.html
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on September 03, 2015, 02:14:57 PM
Dana,

Any thought to where the shingle mill restoration work will be accomplished?
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Dana Deering on January 18, 2016, 07:19:31 PM
Hi All,

     I wanted to post an update on the shingle mill since there's been nothing added here for a while.  A few weeks ago I removed one of the legs from the mill.  It came free fairly easily so now we have a pattern for making four new ones.  I went into it thinking that the wood was oak but once I got it apart the grain didn't look tight enough to be oak.  It looks more like yellow pine.  If I can get away a few Saturdays this winter I want to continue working on getting the legs replaced, cleaning the pitch and oil off the frame, etc., replace some worn springs, and generally try to get it in condition for a possible demonstration run at the Annual Picnic.   I also need to dedicate some time to helping clear the new mill site at TOM. 

Dana
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Ira Schreiber on January 18, 2016, 08:00:54 PM
Thanks for the update. I am awaiting the firing up of that Continental 6.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Stewart "Start" Rhine on January 18, 2016, 09:26:18 PM
We cleared a little bit more of the TOM site today.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on January 18, 2016, 11:01:17 PM
I was thinking on the way to the museum today that I should bring the tank for the Continental home for cleaning. But I left without it. Had other things on my mind, and something else in the trunk of the presidential automobile. Maybe next time.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Brendan Barry on January 21, 2016, 05:31:39 AM
The new frog and switch points for the shingle mill switch arrived at Sheepscot this week.

The switch points are on top and the frog is on the bottom.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_3476.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_3477.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74007/IMG_3480.jpg)

Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on January 23, 2016, 08:30:03 PM
Started working on the Continental today. A LOT of crud in the tank. This is what was dumped out at Sheepscot before transport to ROW MOW 1 Mfg. for further cleaning
(http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m573/miketrainnut/Mobile%20Uploads/0123161430_zps9ppk22t3.jpg)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Fred L. Kuhns on January 23, 2016, 09:41:39 PM
 Brendan, Where are the necessary parts for the switch delivered ?  Fred L. Kuhns
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Brendan Barry on January 24, 2016, 01:24:08 AM
The switch parts were delivered to the shop and the parts are stored in bay 2 for the moment.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on January 24, 2016, 05:59:58 PM
Lots of stuff came out. Looks like coal, and burns about like it in the wood stove.(http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m573/miketrainnut/Mobile%20Uploads/0124161024_zpsbeynhow8.jpg)

(http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m573/miketrainnut/Mobile%20Uploads/0124161024a_zpss88uzqso.jpg)

Another pile after I cleaned up the first.

(http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m573/miketrainnut/Mobile%20Uploads/0124161139_zpsboev5wxl.jpg)
(http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m573/miketrainnut/Mobile%20Uploads/0124161139a_zpsaejqkpp6.jpg)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Ira Schreiber on January 24, 2016, 10:00:09 PM
That is what gasoline looks like after the liquid evaporates.
Lots of carbon.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on January 24, 2016, 11:59:09 PM
Yes, I'd say the tank was full when last used by the amount. Probably could have filled a gallon bucket easily
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Richard Cavalloro on January 25, 2016, 12:18:59 AM
I wonder how the fuel lines and carb are.......      Side note, is there a drawing of the Mill and siding plan yet?

Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on January 25, 2016, 12:51:36 AM
Fuel line is brass and will be replaced. Carb is an updraft, definately needs a cleaning, but the tank is the worst of it. I am letting it dry out some more, then going to try a hand full of 1/4 inch nuts and rattle them around. Then the Coke trick. See if that cleans things out.

I did a rough drawing, and sent it to the person who did the layout plans for Sheepscot when the car barn, parking lot and bathrooms were being planed. When he is done, we will have a scaled down version of what will work. Once the planning committee accepts it, and the board gives the approval, I intend to post it here and on Facebook. But we are weeks away from that happening
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Richard Cavalloro on January 25, 2016, 02:36:06 AM
Mike, THere are products out there if the coke doesn't work.   I'm sure you already know but the ethanol in the modern gas destroys the old rubber.  Might be worth a shop replacing any parts that might get damaged.
   Rick
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on January 26, 2016, 01:26:34 AM
Started the liquid part of the cleaning by pouring a gallon of paint thinner in last night and latting it sit. This afternoon, I shook it all around and got out about a large coffee cup full. Added 10, 1/4-20 nuts, screened out the sediment from the thinner with a paint strainer and poured it back in. Let sit for an hour, shook it for a few minutes, and poured out another extra large coffee cup full. Strained and poured the thinner in, shook again and another large coffee cup of crud. The picture is a 2 gallon bucket with a 4 inch putty knife, for size reference.
(http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m573/miketrainnut/Mobile%20Uploads/0125161957_zpspbjepsud.jpg)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Paul Uhland on January 26, 2016, 03:06:03 AM
Ewwwww....looks disgusting.
Don't soft drinks, including Coke, contain weak sulfamic acid? If true, no wonder it works.
 I use CLR- Calcium Lime Rust remover from Wal*Mart...contains:  lactic acid, gluconic acid, lauramine oxide, dipropylene glycol n-butyl ether, plus colorings.
Works pretty well.  
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Stephen Piwowarski on January 26, 2016, 03:15:18 AM
Wow, it's amazing how much junk you are getting out of there! I was thinking about the cleaning process and got to wondering whether adding new gas to the stuff in there would somehow dissolve the junk since some of those liquids which had been absent would be added back in. Not sure how that would work out chemically.

vinegar is supposed to be really good too as well as pine sol.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on January 26, 2016, 10:19:13 AM
There is too much stuff for me to feel comfortable trying to put gas in and just run it. I see several more days of this, then maybe the soda trick after I quit getting stuff out. The tank may need to be coated, but hard to tell with all the gunk in there right now.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Keith Taylor on January 26, 2016, 01:49:48 PM
Ewwwww....looks disgusting.
Don't soft drinks, including Coke, contain weak sulfamic acid? If true, no wonder it works.
 I use CLR- Calcium Lime Rust remover from Wal*Mart...contains:  lactic acid, gluconic acid, lauramine oxide, dipropylene glycol n-butyl ether, plus colorings.
Works pretty well.  
Coke has phosphoric acid which will clean aluminum nicely.

Keith
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Paul Uhland on January 27, 2016, 04:49:42 AM
Right. Phosphoric acid it is.
Thanks.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on January 27, 2016, 11:05:12 PM
I grew tired of the slow process I was using to clean the tank, so today I brought the tank to work. After work, I fired up the big pressure washer and started blasting. I still got large chunks out. I cleaned until I felt I had got it as good as I was going to. The inside bottom is very clean. The top, not so much. So tomorrow, I will try again. I am going to try installing an elbow on the end of the pressure washer wand. If succussful, it should peel the rest of the stuff off the parts of the tank I could not reach.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Tom Casper on January 28, 2016, 01:17:32 AM
Way to go Mike!  MORE Power!  ;D

Tom C.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on March 06, 2016, 05:50:40 PM
I have spent the morning gathering material for the Shingle Mill to produce shingles out of. One down, 5 to go. The one I took first was leaning toward the house. The rest are leaning toward the road and power lines. They generate an impressive amount of tree trash.
(http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m573/miketrainnut/Mobile%20Uploads/0306160953_zpseyb115nv.jpg)
(http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m573/miketrainnut/Mobile%20Uploads/0306161100_zpshc5vqqky.jpg)
(http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m573/miketrainnut/Mobile%20Uploads/0306161153_zpsiyqrgsk4.jpg)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jeff Schumaker on March 06, 2016, 08:52:00 PM
What type of trees are you cutting down, Mike?

Jeff S.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on March 06, 2016, 09:06:50 PM
I also have about 6-7 cedars ready to be cut down, 10-14" caliper.  When can I bring them up?
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Bill Reidy on March 06, 2016, 09:34:02 PM
What's that white stuff on the ground, Mike?  We haven't seen much of it this winter down around Boston.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Philip Marshall on March 06, 2016, 10:15:39 PM
What type of trees are you cutting down

They're northern white cedar, aka arbor vitae (Thuja occidentalis) -- perfect for shingles.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Jeff Schumaker on March 06, 2016, 10:53:28 PM
Thanks for the info. I didn't realize they were such a messy tree. Then again, I don't think there is much cedar in NW Ohio.

Jeff S.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on March 06, 2016, 11:02:54 PM
These are a white cedar, that was planted prior to the 40's by my grandfather or grandmother. My father remembers jumping over them as a kid. I hauled home 30 feet of tree, some too small to use for shingles, but would make a few good fence posts. And yes, very messy. Two trailer loads of limbs from one tree.

John, we don't have a spot for them just yet, but I would like to make a brow to store these on near the woods track. I made the larger logs 6' to ease in handling. Figuring we make 18 inch shingles, we can get 4 bolts out of that log.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on March 14, 2016, 12:54:15 AM
My cedar log and fence post pile grows. 2 more trees today. And yes, I still have some snow.
(http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m573/miketrainnut/Mobile%20Uploads/0313161246_zps1d15uybf.jpg)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Carl G. Soderstrom on March 15, 2016, 05:49:00 AM
Mike
Old time trick to preserve fence post is char the end going in the ground.
Listed by Eric Sloane in his book Do's (1700 & 1800 hints)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on March 20, 2016, 10:20:52 PM
Well, finished the trees today. Cleaned up the mess. And now have a pile of cedar ready for the mill. Some pieces will need to be split with a saw, but lots of shingle making logs here, should be enough to reshingle a tool house

(http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m573/miketrainnut/Mobile%20Uploads/0320161800_zpsgiv0qkyk.jpg)

(http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m573/miketrainnut/Mobile%20Uploads/0320161800a_zpsex7ykv2n.jpg)

(http://i1132.photobucket.com/albums/m573/miketrainnut/Mobile%20Uploads/0320161800b_zpsp8d0tw7d.jpg)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on July 11, 2016, 08:40:44 PM
Parts have been ordered for the Continental motor. A new Condensor and distributor brush to try and improve the spark. Should be in this week, so I can install this weekend. Several of us are anxious to hear it run.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on July 12, 2016, 12:45:01 AM
Has anyone started a preliminary design for the site and the building structures?  I assume post and beam construction.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on July 12, 2016, 11:30:27 AM
Dana has the dimensions of the old building, and the plan was to try and replicate that, atleast in size. Too many other projects are taking the focus right now, and as soon as we get those completed we can start on the next. I think we have a few more trees to remove first though.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on July 14, 2016, 12:32:04 AM
The internet is a wonderful tool. I was able to locate the parts I needed right here in Maine. They are way off the beaten path, but very quick. Parts arrived today. Any magneto parts we need, they will definately get a call
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on July 18, 2016, 01:05:27 AM
New condensor installed and points were cleaned and adjusted in the continental. Tried starting it several times, priming it by removing up to 5 plugs and dumping in some gas. I got a shower of rusty carbon type stuff several times from the stack. Backfires and sputters was all I could achieve. So next attempt will be back on the carburation side of it.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on July 31, 2016, 10:37:10 PM
Spent about an hour this afternoon fussing with the continental. Ran somewhat on ether. Checked the fuel. Going in but not through the carburator. So I removed the carb and brought it home again. Evidently, when I first tried to start the motor this spring, it loosened up some gunk and the needle valve stuck shut. I cleaned the inlet and seat up again, several times, then gave it a shot of WD 40 when I was done. This should keep the needle from sticking until I put it back on next Sunday.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: John McNamara on July 31, 2016, 11:28:14 PM
Does anyone have any information about Continental engines? Who made them and during what period, etc?
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Terry Harper on August 01, 2016, 12:30:42 AM
Hello John,

Continental Motors Company started in 1905. Through the 1930's they built up a substantial business providing engines
to a number of independent automobile and truck companies including at one point or another - Auburn, Corbitt, Ruxton, Moon etc. They also
developed a very successful line of engines intended for industrial purposes such as the one you folks are working with and supplied
engines to a number of tractor manufacturers.

In the late 1929 they developed their first aircraft engine and formed a subsidiary company  - Continental Aircraft Engine Company which was eventually
purchased by Telledyne. Continental aircraft engines are still a mainstay of the piston engine aircraft industry.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on August 07, 2016, 10:19:45 PM
IT'S ALIVE...It's alive. First attempt to start it..
https://youtu.be/rzklCww-NhU (https://youtu.be/rzklCww-NhU)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Ira Schreiber on August 07, 2016, 11:15:19 PM
Gosh, it sounds and idles like an Alco diesel.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on August 07, 2016, 11:35:50 PM
I picked up some new plugs. Thinking one or two are bad.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: John Kokas on August 07, 2016, 11:41:14 PM
Fooled me to.. ???... Thought at first it was a diesel.   
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on August 08, 2016, 12:22:30 AM
https://youtu.be/b_mj3eqjBlE (https://youtu.be/b_mj3eqjBlE)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Paul Uhland on August 09, 2016, 08:15:31 PM
Either that's just a rough-running two cylinder motor, or new plugs are DEFINITELY needed. ;D
Betcha it'll run SMOOOOOTH then.
Once we at  2926  got a stuck valve in our ancient Clark forklift Continental Six  working it ran fine, still runs great.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on August 09, 2016, 11:37:01 PM
This is a Continental 6 cylinder. Been sitting for years. Surprised it ran this good
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Terry Harper on August 09, 2016, 11:53:50 PM
Mike,

Under your care I am sure you will have it running smooth as silk soon.  ;D
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on August 15, 2016, 08:26:51 PM
As Stewart mentioned in Sundays post, my main objective for the weekend was make the shingle mill run. Saturday I played with the motor a bit more. New plugs helped it out, but not a lot. So I got it running the best I could. I had gotten the belting ready and with the help of our saw mill guy Dean Copeland, learned how to use our belt splicer. I had 2 leather belts ready for Sunday. After some thought on the way home, I brought my little mirror with me and removed the plug from the motor from the offending cylinder ( I figured out which one by using my temp gun on Saturday, 5 of 6 cylinders were about 400 degrees on the exhaust manifold) and looked in. The exhaust valve was stuck open. I tried various things to get it back closed, but it would not budge. Knowing this would not harm anything other than compression on that cylinder, I decided enough playing with the motor, time for some action.

So I set about getting the flatcar in position and then used Ichabod to place the Continental on 126. I had the belt hooked up and did a test run before Dana came back with the 11am train. I had Dana come over and fired it up again. We did some oiling trying to free things up. Remember, this is the first time in probably 20 years or more this has run.

Test run complete, I grabbed some lunch then got a cedar "bolt" ready. I cut it to 15 inches, and set it in the jaws, while Brendan held them open. Time for the real test. I gave Brendan the quick lesson on the Continental and he started it up, and engaged the clutch. I then engaged the clutch for the carriage and the show began. One thing worth mentioning, the long stringy shavings travel about 10 or 15 feet, in this case right toward Brendan. After a few test cuts, we shut down because it was not cutting completely though the bolt. So I took the power saw and did a vertical cut through the bolt, re-inserted it in the jaws, and we tried again. This time we got complete shingles. Some were thick, some were paper thin. Only one or two had tapers. There is so much adjustment in the machine that after some fine tuning, it should make shingles (and the stringy sawdust) just fine.

Plenty of pictures were taken, but not sure of any while it was actually running.. I did see the Facebook team there, so I am sure some will appear there soon.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: John McNamara on August 15, 2016, 08:58:57 PM
Congratulations! Another "oldie but goodie" saved!
-John
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Ira Schreiber on August 15, 2016, 09:26:26 PM
I had a flat head 8 cylinder Studebaker engine with several stuck valves. I pulled the head and "gently" tapped the offending valves down and rotated the engine. In short order the valves started opening and closing properly. A little oil on the stems, reinstalled the old head gasket and fired it up. It purred on all eight. Mission accomplished.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Roger Cole on August 15, 2016, 09:46:01 PM
Most likely the offending cylinder's exhaust valve was left in the open position after the last shutdown prior to its dormancy.  Moisture from all those years probably froze it in the "up" position.  I agree with Ira that removal of the head and "gentle" tapping (with a little penetrating oil} should do the trick.  Pulling the head on a flathead sure beats an OHV or OHC engine.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Chuck Watford on August 15, 2016, 09:50:50 PM
Looking forward to seeing photos!  Might try a little Marvel Mystery Oil in the gas tank and the engine on on the old Continental, might help free up the sticking valve.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike Fox on August 16, 2016, 12:16:21 AM
I have found that a complete gasket set can be purchased at a very reasonable price. A lot of the gaskets have leaks, and by taking the time to replace them will keep the engine cleaner in the future.

Other than the stuck valve, there was little smoke from the exhaust. So I do not think anything more would need to be done. It would be nice if the valve went back that easy. I could get on it but not with anything I could hit. Not enough clearance. I will be putting some oil in there again Sunday and let it sit.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Brendan Barry on August 16, 2016, 01:21:23 AM
Pictures from Sunday.

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74008/IMG_7552.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74008/IMG_7545.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74008/IMG_7539.jpg)

(http://i148.photobucket.com/albums/s5/bbarry74/bbarry74008/IMG_7533.jpg)
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Roger Cole on August 16, 2016, 01:23:08 AM
Try one of the newer 'penetrating' oils.  I've used PB Blaster and was amazed how it was able to penetrate rusted frozen nuts & bolts enabling me to take them apart without twisting the nuts off or going the hacksaw route.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Wayne Laepple on August 18, 2016, 08:02:52 PM
Here's a Lane shingle machine, built in Vermont, run by a traction engine at the Rough & Tumble Engineers at Kinzer, Pa.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Wayne Laepple on August 18, 2016, 08:06:34 PM
Here's another rig nearby:

Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Wayne Laepple on August 19, 2016, 01:02:27 AM
I'll second Roger's note above about PB Blaster. It's great stuff for rusted nuts and bolts. Works overnight.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Richard Cavalloro on August 19, 2016, 02:45:48 AM
If the PB Blaster doesn't work, Kroil should do the trick.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Mike the Choochoo Nix on August 20, 2016, 02:46:02 AM
Also don't forget a 50/50 mix of tranny fluid and acetone. It worked on my old Chevy.
Mike Nix
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Dwight Winkley on July 28, 2017, 01:05:37 PM
Wed. July 25th. On my way to the museum from my home I passed the site of the original shingle mill.

The shingle mill building plus a small garage building used for storage have been torn down. I would say by hand, as all the tree's growing around both buildings were not disturbed. The old farm house is still standing.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Troy Congdon on April 30, 2018, 01:47:04 AM
On another forum I frequent, someone shared this video. It is a silent film taken by a Maine lumber-mill boss when he realized that the work he was doing was obsolete and would not be known by the following generations. It is narrated in a proper Maine accent that reminds those of us who are away what home sounds like.

No two footers but there is a train in the background at one point and some shingle mill action too.

https://youtu.be/cIKCjQdxtO0
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: ALAIN DELASSUS on April 30, 2018, 04:15:49 PM
Hi! Interesting movie from an historic past and not too hard to understand in so far as the guy is not speaking too fast. Thanks for posting it.
Title: Re: Shingle Mill - Official Work Thread
Post by: Gary Kraske on April 30, 2018, 05:09:50 PM
Thank you , Troy. Barb & I looked at it last night and she got a real feel for what it was like in winter logging.  Growing up I heard stories about river driving but never saw any by the late 40's early 50's.