Author Topic: Fish Hatchery in Head Tide / New Milford  (Read 238 times)

Alex Harvilchuck

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Fish Hatchery in Head Tide / New Milford
« on: September 26, 2017, 05:05:32 PM »
I've been reading that the first fish hatchery in Maine was at Head Tide / New Milford. Did it get served by the railway?

Jeff Schumaker

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Re: Fish Hatchery in Head Tide / New Milford
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2017, 10:52:34 PM »
Alex,

Can you point me to this information? A recent search turned up the following:

The state's first fish hatchery was at Craig Brook in East Orland, started in 1871, and rebuilt in 1880. It became a National Fish Hatchery in 1889, dedicated to raising and stocking juvenile Atlantic salmon in Maine.


 
East Orland is further east of where the WW&F ran.

Jeff S.
Hey Rocky, watch me pull a moose trout out of my hat.

Alex Harvilchuck

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Re: Fish Hatchery in Head Tide / New Milford
« Reply #2 on: September 27, 2017, 04:33:02 PM »
The info seems to be coming from a few places, the main source seems to be "a Brief History of Old Alna" written by Nell Walker in 1970.

http://www.worldcat.org/title/brief-history-of-old-alna-1970/oclc/666494082

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONERS OF INLAND FISHERIES AND GAME FOR THE STATE OF MAINE FOR THE YEAR 1898
http://www.penbay.org/ifg/ifg_1898.html

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Progress in fish culture was delayed by the Civil War, but upon the return of peace the matter received an impetus, largely through Mr. Greene's exertions and private hatcheries and fish preserves multiplied in all the states, and are still increasing in number. Soon the state governments took it up and State Fish Commissions were formed for the encouragement of this industry and the protection of the fisheries, both inland and upon the coast.

New Hampshire has the honor of having taken the lead, founding her fish commission in 1864, during the latter part of the war.

This commission made the first attempt, in 1866, of breeding salmon in the country for re-stocking the rivers, and also made-the first public appropriation toward that end.

Massachusetts and Vermont were the first states to follow the example, and created fish commissions in 1865.

Connecticut and Pennsylvania came next in 1866, and our own State, Maine, in 1867.

The first attempt in 1867 seems to have been with a David Pottle in Alna.

https://www.mainememory.net/sitebuilder/site/1428/page/2092/display?use_mmn=
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Charles G. Atkins, along with Nathan W. Foster, became Maine's Commissioners of Fisheries in 1867. They researched fish propagation and began collecting eggs from landlocked salmon and working to fertilize and hatch them. David Pottle of Alna fed and reared most of the eggs the commissioners collected.

Atkins successfully used the dry method of egg gathering, fertilizing close to 100 percent of the eggs he gathered.

« Last Edit: September 27, 2017, 05:30:08 PM by Alex Harvilchuck »

Alex Harvilchuck

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Re: Fish Hatchery in Head Tide / New Milford
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2017, 05:33:29 PM »
So the answer to my original question seems to be No, since the railroad didn't happen until 30-ish years later. It's still rather fascinating.

It might be a fun thing to have an event or exhibit about. Couple it with a Fish Fry....