Author Topic: Edaville #11  (Read 10607 times)

Steve Smith

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #30 on: December 04, 2013, 03:40:29 AM »
Wayne, or any other forum member,could you explain what a languid plate is and how it works? From context I'm guessing that it may help retain a certain pitch, or, in a chime whistle, combination of pitches, despite a lower steam pressure than what the whistle was made for. How does it do that? Intriguing!

Jeff Schumaker

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #31 on: December 04, 2013, 03:42:10 PM »
What a neat little loco. Does it have a steel or wooden cab? It's hard to tell in the photo and video?

Jeff S.
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Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #32 on: December 04, 2013, 06:39:19 PM »
Wooden cab, natural finish.

Bill Piche

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #33 on: December 04, 2013, 07:17:57 PM »
Wooden cab, natural finish.

Give it enough time. It'll be black...  ;)
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John Stone

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #34 on: December 04, 2013, 09:31:55 PM »
I'm curious about the languid plate, also.

My first guess would be a sub-par meal served by a lackluster waiter.

Stewart "Start" Rhine

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #35 on: December 04, 2013, 11:20:09 PM »
IIRC, the languid plate cuts down and regulates the flow of steam into the whistle.  It's like a restricter plate that keeps the steam port at the same rate.  IE: If there is a pressure tank on the steam feed pipe, the lanquid plate would keep the whistle sounding the same until the tank ran out instead of the volume dropping as steam pressure drops.  Wayne can correct me if I missed something.

Start

Keith Taylor

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #36 on: December 05, 2013, 12:02:07 AM »
IIRC, the languid plate cuts down and regulates the flow of steam into the whistle.  It's like a restricter plate that keeps the steam port at the same rate.  IE: If there is a pressure tank on the steam feed pipe, the lanquid plate would keep the whistle sounding the same until the tank ran out instead of the volume dropping as steam pressure drops.  Wayne can correct me if I missed something.

Start
Technically the languid plate directs the steam sheet and aims it at the edge of the mouth of the bell. The whistle will not sound the same as the pressure decreases. The width of the slit between the languid plate and the bowl determines at what pressure the whistle will sound best. The whistle on our No.10 is designed, by using a different slit width, to blow on a lower pressure than the identical whistle on CNJ 113. Acoustically a steam whistle is the same as an organ pipe where the length of the bell determines pitch and the diameter of the bell affects timbre.
Keith (who also plays with pipe organs in his spare time)

Wayne Laepple

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #37 on: December 05, 2013, 12:10:49 AM »
Thanks for that perfect explanation, Keith. I've been out of service since yesterday with Comcast internet issues, and they just got us back in service a little while ago.

Steve Smith

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Re: Edaville #11
« Reply #38 on: December 05, 2013, 07:49:18 PM »
I could have googled and helped myself. Many returns, as usual. Link to one is

 http://www.fonema.se/whistle/hotwhiz.html