Author Topic: Aerial Photography  (Read 2050 times)

Ed Lecuyer

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Aerial Photography
« on: September 16, 2010, 01:03:22 AM »
MODERATORS NOTE:
Aerial Photography has been converted from the pre-July 2008 WW&F Discussion Forum.
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Mike Fox wrote:
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Try this site for aerial pictures of any where in Maine. I have followed the WW&F in many places. You can see a lot of others too. Trying some FS&K but not much to follow there. Copy and paste to your address bar. Enjoy.

http://megisims.state.me.us/website/orthomap/viewer.htm

Mike

James Patten replied:
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The pictures from around the Museum area seem to be from 1998 or 1999 - when the track petered out near the bottom of Davis Grade.

Mike Fox replied:
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They are older but if time allows one can find grade in quite a few places.
Mike

ETSRRCo replied:
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Where in Strong was the depot located? Along what streets? I have tried to follow the SR&RL from Farmington and Strong but I lose it just north of Farmington.

James Patten replied:
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Strong's station location is now a parking lot, basically.  However many of the outlying buildings that were there when the railroad ran are still there.  The mill is there as well.

Stewart Rhine replied:
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As James noted, the location of the Strong station is now an open lot.  You can best find it by watching for the large red toothpick mill on the right and the smaller original white clapboard creamery on the left when you drive up the main street.  The other mill building (just past the creamery on the left) is now in a natural wood color and the North side has been rebuilt to serve as a store and gas station.  The SR&RL station sat Southeast of the creamery building on the same side of the road.  If you have the Two Feet Between the Rails books you will see the creamery and mill buildings as landmarks to locate the station area.  Dr. Bell's home is next to the toothpick mill and it was right across the street from the station.  This home shows up in alot of photos taken at Strong.  The front of the home is as it was in the 1930's so it is also a good landmark.  The open area next to the creamery is where the switch was for the F&M branch off of the original SRRR Farmington to Phillips mainline.  There are some newer wooden buildings on the site of the turntable.  These are a bit West of where the station sat.

Stewart

Joe Fox replied:
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I will be glad when they update the aerial photo's on like google earth, or whatever, so that I can see the railroad grade that is now cut out. I like the ones that Mike White takes from the air plane, those are great. The images from a satelite are good for measuring things.

Joe

MikeW replied:
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The aerial photography available on the Maine Office of GIS website referred to earlier was flown in the Spring of 2003.  These "orthophotos" are orthometrically corrected, meaning that they have been corrected to remove distortion due to terrain and lens distortions.  This means that you can fairly accurately measure the distance between any two ground points on these.  Note they were not corrected to remove building lean etc.  Also, these photos are registered to the UTM Zone 19 coordinate system (if you download the appropriate info).  You can use them as backdrops in software that supports geographic coordinate systems such as GIS and high-end CAD systems.  The pixel size (aka ground resolution) for the Alna area is 2 feet.  Your eye is actually able to discern features smaller than the pixel size for some wierd physiological reasons.

Southern, central and coastal areas are currently available through the state website.  More orthophoto imagery will become available as budgets permit.  FYI, the imagery on Google is the same, although Google seems to have a more complete set than the State (go figure).

I have often used this imagery to follow old railroad grades.  It is amazing how well you can find grades that have been abandoned 90+ years!

Josh Botting replied:
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You should try Google earth, I think the interphase is a little more freindly, and the pictures may be newer, and you can fly over the land.
I just downloaded it, kinda a pain, but neat none the less.

LARC replied:
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The photos used in Google Earth are actually derived mostly from the MaineGIS project.  Check out some other areas of the state such as Fort Fairfield for Ultra High Rezolution photos, and Cumberland County for .5' resolution photos.  There are some differences though with Googles maps though.  As mentioned earlier the MaineGIS maps could, simply put, be considered 'smart maps' meaning with, as stated earlier, with the right software they can be merged with topographic maps, have their geological features extruded to depict terrain, etc.  One popular program being ARCmap, and ARCscene, which I believe are free, but may be difficult to obtain, but would be benneficial to the museum or anyone in land-use.  Also check out a site sponsored by Microsoft which allows the user to toggle between USGS maps and the corresponding Aerial Photos, just google 'Microsoft Terraserver'  (I need 4 more post before I can attach the URL) it should come up at the first link.

MikeW replied:
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ArcMap is the core of the ESRI software products.  The base version is named ArcView, and it lists for around $1500 with a street price of about $1150.  ArcScene is an extension.  You are talking $$$ if you want to get into this.  The Portland area photos were originally acquired by GPCOG, then purchased by the Maine GeoLibrary Board.  Similarly, the Fort Fairfield area was originally acquired by a group of towns, then later purchased for use by the Maine Office of GIS by the GeoLibrary Board.  Later Google acquired these too.
Ed Lecuyer
Moderator, WW&F Forum